Richard Smalley

Richard E. SmalleyRick SmalleySmalleyDr. Richard Smalley
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.wikipedia
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Harry Kroto

Harold KrotoHarold W. KrotoSir Harry Kroto
In 1996, along with Robert Curl, also a professor of chemistry at Rice, and Harold Kroto, a professor at the University of Sussex, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of a new form of carbon, buckminsterfullerene, also known as buckyballs.
He shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley for their discovery of fullerenes.

Robert Curl

Robert F. Curl Jr.CurlF.R. Curl
In 1996, along with Robert Curl, also a professor of chemistry at Rice, and Harold Kroto, a professor at the University of Sussex, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of a new form of carbon, buckminsterfullerene, also known as buckyballs.
He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996 for the discovery of the nanomaterial buckminsterfullerene, along with Richard Smalley (also of Rice University) and Harold Kroto of the University of Sussex.

Buckminsterfullerene

buckyballC 60 buckyballs
In 1996, along with Robert Curl, also a professor of chemistry at Rice, and Harold Kroto, a professor at the University of Sussex, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of a new form of carbon, buckminsterfullerene, also known as buckyballs.
In 1985 their work was repeated by Harold Kroto, James R. Heath, Sean O'Brien, Robert Curl, and Richard Smalley at Rice University, who recognized the structure of C 60 as buckminsterfullerine.

Rice University

RiceRice Institutebeer bike
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.
In 1997, the Edythe Bates Old Grand Organ and Recital Hall and the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, renamed in 2005 for the late Nobel Prize winner and Rice professor Richard E. Smalley, were dedicated at Rice.

Fullerene

fullerenesbuckyballsbuckminsterfullerene
This research is significant for the discovery of a new allotrope of carbon known as a fullerene.
The first fullerene molecule to be discovered, and the family's namesake, buckminsterfullerene (C 60 ), was manufactured in 1985 by Richard Smalley, Robert Curl, James Heath, Sean O'Brien, and Harold Kroto at Rice University.

James R. Heath

James HeathJim Heath
Although only three people can be cited for a Nobel Prize, graduate students James R. Heath, Yuan Liu, and Sean C. O'Brien participated in the work.
When Heath was a graduate student at Rice University, he ran the experimental apparatus that generated the first C 60 molecules and, ultimately, won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the three senior members of the collaboration: Robert F. Curl and Richard E. Smalley of Rice University and Harold Kroto of the University of Sussex.

Hope College

HopeFlying DutchmenHope Flying Dutchmen
Smalley attended Hope College for two years before transferring to the University of Michigan where he received his Bachelor of Science in 1965.
Richard Smalley*, Nobel prize-winning chemist

Nanotechnology

nanosciencenanotechnologiesnanotech
Smalley spun off his work into a company, Carbon Nanotechnologies Inc. and associated nanotechnologies.
Second, Fullerenes were discovered in 1985 by Harry Kroto, Richard Smalley, and Robert Curl, who together won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Molecular nanotechnology

nanotechnologyadvanced nanotechnologymolecular
As a consequence of these researches, Smalley was able to persuade the administration of Rice University under then-president Malcolm Gillis to create Rice's Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) focusing on any aspect of molecular nanotechnology.
Several researchers, including Nobel Prize winner Dr. Richard Smalley (1943–2005), attacked the notion of universal assemblers, leading to a rebuttal from Drexler and colleagues, and eventually to an exchange of letters.

National Historic Chemical Landmarks

National Historic Chemical LandmarkInternational Historic Chemical LandmarkACS National Historic Chemical Landmark
The discovery of fullerenes was recognized in 2010 by the designation of a National Historic Chemical Landmark by the American Chemical Society at the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology at Rice University in Houston, Texas.
Discovery of fullerenes by Richard Smalley, Robert Curl, James R. Heath, Sean O'Brien, and Harold Kroto at Rice University in 1985

Molecular assembler

molecular manufacturingUniversal Constructorassemblers
He was an outspoken skeptic of the idea of molecular assemblers, as advocated by K. Eric Drexler.
One of the most outspoken critics of some concepts of "molecular assemblers" was Professor Richard Smalley (1943–2005) who won the Nobel prize for his contributions to the field of nanotechnology.

James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials

APS James C. McGroddy PrizeInternational Prize for New Materials
APS International Prize for New Materials, 1992 (Joint with R. F. Curl & H. W. Kroto)
1992: Robert F. Curl, Harold W. Kroto, Richard E. Smalley

Glenn T. Seaborg Medal

Seaborg Medal
Glenn T. Seaborg Medal, University of California at Los Angeles, 2002

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award

E. O. Lawrence AwardE.O. Lawrence AwardE.O. Lawrence Memorial Award
Richard E. Smalley

Norman Hackerman

Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.

Chemistry

chemistchemicalChemical Sciences
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.

Physics

physicistphysicalphysicists
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.

Houston's Restaurant

Houston, TexasHouston, TXHouston
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.

Texas

TXTexanState of Texas
Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Nobel PrizeChemistryNobel Laureate in Chemistry
In 1996, along with Robert Curl, also a professor of chemistry at Rice, and Harold Kroto, a professor at the University of Sussex, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of a new form of carbon, buckminsterfullerene, also known as buckyballs.

Akron, Ohio

AkronAkron, OHAkron, Ohio, USA
Smalley, the youngest of 4 siblings, was born in Akron, Ohio on June 6, 1943 to Frank Dudley Smalley, Jr., and Esther Virginia Rhoads.
Richard Smalley, winner of a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering buckminsterfullerene (buckyballs) was born in the city during 1943.

Ohio

OHState of OhioOhio, USA
Smalley, the youngest of 4 siblings, was born in Akron, Ohio on June 6, 1943 to Frank Dudley Smalley, Jr., and Esther Virginia Rhoads.

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas CityKansas City, MOMissouri (Kansas City)
He grew up in Kansas City, Missouri.