Richard Whately

Archbishop WhatelyRichard WhateleyArchbishop of DublinWhatelyWhately, Richard
Richard Whately (1 February 1787 – 8 October 1863) was an English rhetorician, logician, economist, academic and theologian who also served as a reforming Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin.wikipedia
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Nassau William Senior

Nassau SeniorSeniorThe London Review
After graduation he acted as a private tutor, in particular to Nassau William Senior who became a close friend, and to Samuel Hinds.
He was educated at Eton College and Magdalen College, Oxford; at university he was a private pupil of Richard Whately, afterwards Archbishop of Dublin with whom he remained connected by ties of lifelong friendship.

Oriel College, Oxford

Oriel CollegeOrielOriel College, Oxford University
He was educated at a private school near Bristol, and at Oriel College, Oxford from 1805.
It was the centre of the "Oriel Noetics" — clerical liberals such as Richard Whately and Thomas Arnold were fellows, and during the 1830s, two intellectually eminent fellows of Oriel, John Keble and Saint John Henry Newman, supported by Canon Pusey (also an Oriel fellow initially, later at Christ Church) and others, formed a group known as the Oxford Movement, alternatively as the Tractarians, or familiarly as the Puseyites.

John Henry Newman

Cardinal NewmanNewmanCardinal John Henry Newman
A reformer, Whately was initially on friendly terms with John Henry Newman.
Richard Whately and Edward Copleston, Provost of Oriel, were leaders in the group of Oriel Noetics, a group of independently thinking dons with a strong belief in free debate.

Drummond Professor of Political Economy

chair of political economyDrummond professorshipDrummond professorship of political economy
In 1829 Whately was elected as Drummond Professor of Political Economy at Oxford in succession to Nassau William Senior.

Samuel Hinds (bishop)

Samuel Hinds
After graduation he acted as a private tutor, in particular to Nassau William Senior who became a close friend, and to Samuel Hinds.
From 1831–33 he was Chaplain to Richard Whately, Archbishop of Dublin before being appointed Vicar of Yardley, Hertfordshire in 1835.

Jane Austen

AustenJane Austen SocietyAusten, Jane
He was a leading Broad Churchman, a prolific and combative author over a wide range of topics, a flamboyant character, and one of the first reviewers to recognise the talents of Jane Austen.
The other important early review was attributed to Richard Whately in 1821.

Essays (Francis Bacon)

EssaysBacon's EssaysEssays'' (Francis Bacon)
The Essays stimulated Richard Whately to republish them with annotations, somewhat extensive, that Whately extrapolated from the originals.

Joseph Whately

Joseph Whateley
He was born in London, the son of the Rev. Dr. Joseph Whately (1730–1797).
Their nine children included as the youngest Richard Whately, and five daughters.

Halesworth

Halesworth, SuffolkHalesworth, England
An uncle, William Plumer, presented him with a living, Halesworth in Suffolk; in August 1822 Whately moved there.
1822–31 – the Reverend Richard Whateley was Rector of Halesworth, living in the Rectory, Rectory Lane.

Pun

paronomasiapunningword play
He was a great talker, a wit, and loved punning.
For example, a complex statement by Richard Whately includes four puns: "Why can a man never starve in the Great Desert? Because he can eat the sand which is there. But what brought the sandwiches there? Why, Noah sent Ham, and his descendants mustered and bred."

Whately Chair of Political Economy

Whately Professor of Political Economychair of political economyProfessor of Political Economy at Trinity College, Dublin
One of Whately's initial acts on going to Dublin was to endow a chair of political economy in Trinity College.
The Whately Chair of Political Economy was established at Trinity College, Dublin by Richard Whately, in 1832.

Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland

Dublin Statistical SocietySocial and Statistical Inquiry Society
Later, in 1846, he founded the Dublin Statistical Society with William Neilson Hancock.
Its first president was Richard Whately.

Encyclopædia Metropolitana

Encyclopedia MetropolitanaEncyclopaedia metropolitana
His Elements of Logic (1826) was drawn from an article "Logic" in the Encyclopædia Metropolitana.
Later critics said of the actual plan that, being the proposal of Coleridge, it had at least enough of a poetical character to be eminently unpractical (Quarterly Review, cxiii, 379); but the treatises by Archbishop Richard Whately, Sir John Herschel, Professors Peter Barlow, George Peacock, Augustus de Morgan, and others, were considered excellent.

James Carlile

In the Irish context, the Christian Evidences was adapted to a form acceptable to Catholic beliefs, with the help of James Carlile.
He sat on the school board with the Anglican Archbishop Richard Whately and the Roman Catholic Archbishop Daniel Murray.

Charles Sanders Peirce

PeirceC. S. PeirceCharles S. Peirce
The Elements of Logic gave an impetus to the study of logic in Britain, and in the United States of America, logician Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914) wrote that his lifelong fascination with logic began when he read Whately's Elements as a 12-year-old boy.
At age 12, Charles read his older brother's copy of Richard Whately's Elements of Logic, then the leading English-language text on the subject.

Elizabeth Whately

Elizabeth PopeElizabeth Pope Whately
Whately married Elizabeth Pope (third daughter of William Pope, born 7 October and baptised 22 December 1795 at Hillingdon, Middlesex) at Cheltenham on 3 July 1821.
Elizabeth Pope Whately (7 October 1795 – 25 April 1860) was an English writer and the wife of Archbishop Richard Whately.

Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College, DublinTrinity CollegeTCD
One of Whately's initial acts on going to Dublin was to endow a chair of political economy in Trinity College.
The decision of Richard Whately and John George de la Poer Beresford was that Heron would remain excluded from Scholarship.

Oriel Noetics

NoeticsOriel Noetic
A member of the loose group called the Oriel Noetics, Whately supported religious liberty, civil rights, and freedom of speech for dissenters, Roman Catholics, Jews, and even atheists.
Others who were Fellows of the College for some period were Thomas Arnold, Joseph Blanco White, Renn Dickson Hampden, Edward Hawkins, and Richard Whately.

Kevin Whately

A programme in the BBC television series Who Do You Think You Are?, broadcast on 2 March 2009, uncovered that Richard Whately was an ancestor of British actor Kevin Whately.
His maternal grandmother, Doris Phillips, was a professional concert singer and his great-great-grandfather, Richard Whately, was Anglican Archbishop of Dublin.

Edward Whately

Edward William Whately
The son of Richard Whately, Archbishop of Dublin from 1831 to 1863, he was born in Halesworth and educated at Rugby School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he matriculated in 1841 and graduated B.A. in 1845.

Mary Louisa Whately

She was the third child, the second daughter, born to Richard Whately and Elizabeth Pope.

Archbishop of Dublin (Church of Ireland)

Archbishop of DublinDublinChurch of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin
Richard Whately (1 February 1787 – 8 October 1863) was an English rhetorician, logician, economist, academic and theologian who also served as a reforming Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin.