Ricimer

Flavius Ricimer
Flavius Ricimer (Classical ; c. 405 – August 18, 472) was a Romanized Germanic general who effectively ruled the remaining territory of the Western Roman Empire from 461 until his death in 472, with a brief interlude in which he contested power with Anthemius.wikipedia
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Anthemius

Procopius Anthemius
Flavius Ricimer (Classical ; c. 405 – August 18, 472) was a Romanized Germanic general who effectively ruled the remaining territory of the Western Roman Empire from 461 until his death in 472, with a brief interlude in which he contested power with Anthemius.
Anthemius was killed by Ricimer, his own general of Gothic descent, who contested power with him.

Magister militum

magistri militummagister peditummagister militum per Orientem
Deriving his power from his position as magister militum of the Western Empire, Ricimer exercised political control through a series of puppet emperors.
This powerful office was often the power behind the throne and was held by Stilicho, Flavius Aetius, Ricimer, and others.

Suebi

SueviSuevicSueves
Ricimer was the son of Rechila, the Suevic King of Galicia.
During the last years of the decline of the Western Roman Empire, the Suebian general Ricimer was its de facto ruler.

Odoacer

Kingdom of ItalyKingdom of OdoacerOdoacer's Kingdom
Ricimer's military office and his dominance over the empire led historians such as J. B. Bury to conclude that he was a link between previous magistri militum, such as the Vandal Stilicho, and the Germanic King of Italy, Odoacer.
Although Jordanes writes of Odoacer as invading Italy "as leader of the Sciri, the Heruli and allies of various races", modern writers describe him as being part of the Roman military establishment, based on John of Antioch's statement that Odoacer was on the side of Ricimer at the beginning of his battle with the emperor Anthemius in 472.

Majorian

Flavius Julius Valerius MajorianusJulius Majorianus AugustusMajorien
According to Sidonius Apollinaris, Ricimer served under the magister militum Flavius Aetius alongside the comes domesticorum Majorian, whom he befriended.
The powerful general Ricimer deposed and killed Majorian, who had become unpopular with the senatorial aristocracy because of his reforms.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
Flavius Ricimer (Classical ; c. 405 – August 18, 472) was a Romanized Germanic general who effectively ruled the remaining territory of the Western Roman Empire from 461 until his death in 472, with a brief interlude in which he contested power with Anthemius.
He disbanded his guard due to popular pressure, and the Suebian general Ricimer used the opportunity to depose Avitus, counting on popular discontent.

Battle of Agrigentum (456)

AgrigentumBattle of Agrigentumland battle
Ricimer achieved his first important victory in 456, when he defeated the Vandals in the Battle of Agrigentum and the Battle of Corsica.
An army of the Western Roman Empire, led by the general Ricimer, drove off an invading force from a fleet of sixty ships sent by the Vandal king Gaiseric to raid Sicily.

Vandals

VandalVandalicVandal Kingdom
Ricimer's military office and his dominance over the empire led historians such as J. B. Bury to conclude that he was a link between previous magistri militum, such as the Vandal Stilicho, and the Germanic King of Italy, Odoacer.
In 456 a Vandal fleet of 60 ships threatening both Gaul and Italy was ambushed and defeated at Agrigentum and Corsica by the Western Roman general Ricimer.

Aegidius

Ricimer's murder of Majorian did not sit well with some portions of the military establishment, notably the commanding general in Gaul, Aegidius, and the commanding general in Dalmatia, Marcellinus, who ruled their respective domains independent from imperial authority.
An ardent supporter of Majorian, Aegidius rebelled against Ricimer when he assassinated Majorian and replaced him with Libius Severus; Aegidius may have pledged his allegiance to Leo I, the Eastern Roman Emperor.

Olybrius

Anicius OlybriusFlavius Anicius Olybrius
Genseric supported Olybrius' candidacy for appointment as emperor.
He was in reality a puppet ruler put on the throne by Ricimer, a Roman general of Germanic descent, and was mainly interested in religion, while the actual power was held by Ricimer and his nephew Gundobad.

Stilicho

Flavius StilichoStiliconeTicinum massacre
Ricimer's military office and his dominance over the empire led historians such as J. B. Bury to conclude that he was a link between previous magistri militum, such as the Vandal Stilicho, and the Germanic King of Italy, Odoacer.
Ricimer

Libius Severus

SeverusFlavius '''Libius [Severus]''' Serpentius AugustusFlavius Libius Severus Serpentius
Facing pressure from the senate and Italian aristocracy, Ricimer named the undistinguished Senator Libius Severus as his puppet emperor.
A Roman senator from Lucania Severus was one of the last Western emperors, emptied of any effective power (the real power was in the hands of the magister militum Ricimer), and unable to solve the many problems affecting the empire; the sources describe him as a pious Christian.

Fall of the Western Roman Empire

decline of the Roman Empirefall of the Roman Empirefall of Rome
Odoacer deposed Western Emperor Romulus Augustulus in 476, in an act often considered to mark the fall of the Western Roman Empire.
He moved on Rome with Visigothic support which gained his acceptance by Majorian and Ricimer, commanders of the remaining army of Italy.

Burgundians

BurgundianBurgundyBurgund
Ricimer's younger sister later married Gondioc, the King of the Burgundians. Both sides appealed to the field army in Gaul, but the Burgundian commanding general of Gaul, Gundobad, supported his uncle Ricimer.
The Patrician Ricimer is also blamed; this event marks the first indication of the link between the Burgundians and Ricimer, who was probably Gundioc's brother-in-law and Gundobad's uncle.

Wallia

His mother was the daughter of Wallia, King of the Visigoths.
Wallia's daughter married Rechila, King of the Suevi, and was the mother of Ricimer and the mother in law of Gundowech, King of the Burgundians.

Avitus

EparchiusEparchius AvitusM. Maecilius Eparchius Avitus Augustus
After the sack, the Visigothic King Theodoric II proclaimed as Emperor Avitus, the Roman military commander in Gaul.
The new Emperor needed the support of both the civil institutions, the Roman senate and the Eastern Roman Emperor Marcian, as well as that of the army and its commanders (the generals Majorian and Ricimer) and the Vandals of Gaiseric.

Gondioc

GundericGunderic/GundiocGundioc
Ricimer's younger sister later married Gondioc, the King of the Burgundians.
After the death of Aetius in 454, Gondioc married the sister of Ricimer, the Gothic general at the time ruling the Western Roman Empire.

Remistus

Avitus named the Visigoth Remistus as magister militum, a position which had been vacant since Aetius's death.
He clashed with the Senate army, led by the Italian magister militum Ricimer and was forced to return to Ravenna; besieged, he was captured and put to death in the Palace in Classis, just outside the city, on September 17.

Battle of Corsica

naval battleCorsicasea battle
Ricimer achieved his first important victory in 456, when he defeated the Vandals in the Battle of Agrigentum and the Battle of Corsica.
The Vandals were defeated at Agrigentum by the Suebian warrior Ricimer, who was acting for Emperor Avitus, after which they sailed for Corsica.

Siege of Rome (472)

Besiegedfive months of fightingSiege of Rome
Besieged, Anthemius took refuge in St. Peter's Basilica.
The Siege of Rome was fought between supporters of the Suebian warrior Ricimer and the Western Roman emperor Anthemius.

Gundobad

Both sides appealed to the field army in Gaul, but the Burgundian commanding general of Gaul, Gundobad, supported his uncle Ricimer.
Previous to this, he had been a Patrician of the Western Roman Empire in 472 – 473, succeeding his uncle Ricimer.

Marcellinus (magister militum)

Marcellinus
Ricimer's murder of Majorian did not sit well with some portions of the military establishment, notably the commanding general in Gaul, Aegidius, and the commanding general in Dalmatia, Marcellinus, who ruled their respective domains independent from imperial authority.
Marcellinus was to take part in a joint attack of Vandal Africa, with him coming from Sicily and Majorian invading from Spain, but before Majorian could begin his campaign the Vandals inflicted a severe defeat on the attack fleet and a year later in 461 the emperor was murdered by Ricimer, who soon after tried to bribe Marcellinus' troops who were mostly Huns, attempting to reduce the generals power.

Power behind the throne

behind the thronede facto rulerde facto'' dictator
With Olybrius on the throne, Genseric would become the real power behind the throne in the West, replacing Ricimer.
Examples of such are Stilicho the general of Emperor Honorius, Aetius, the power behind the throne of Honorius' nephew Valentinian III, Ricimer the puppet master of Emperors Avitus, Majorian, Libius Severus, Procopius Anthemius and Olybrius, and then finally Flavius Orestes, the father of the usurper emperor Romulus Augustulus, and the Germanic chieftain Odoacer, who were the masters in the West during the reigns of Emperor Julius Nepos and then Orestes' son, the aforementioned Romulus.

Alypia (daughter of Anthemius)

Alypia
To solidify his connections with the new emperor, Ricimer diplomatically married Anthemius' daughter Alypia, and for some time lived in peace with Anthemius.
Anthemius married his daughter to Ricimer, the magister militum of the West and power-behind-the-throne; the aim of this bond was to strengthen the relationship between Anthemius and his magister militum, who had already deposed three Western Emperors.

Patrician (ancient Rome)

patricianpatrikiospatricians
With the Western throne vacant, the new Eastern Emperor, Leo I, granted Ricimer the title of patrician and the rank of magister militum on February 28, 457.
In the Western Roman Empire, the title was sparingly used and retained its high prestige, being awarded, especially in the 5th century, to the powerful magistri militum who dominated the state, such as Stilicho, Constantius III, Flavius Aetius, Comes Bonifacius, and Ricimer.