Sphere rotating around one of its diameters
Finding the direction of the cross product by the right-hand rule
An example of rotation. Each part of the worm drive—both the worm and the worm gear—is rotating on its own axis.
Conventional direction of the axis of a rotating body
Left-handed coordinates on the left, right-handed coordinates on the right.
Left- and right-handed screws
Prediction of direction of field (B), given that the current I flows in the direction of the thumb
Finding direction of magnetic field (B) for an electrical coil
Illustration of the right-hand rule on the ninth series of the Swiss 200-francs banknote.

In mathematics, a rotating body is commonly represented by a pseudovector along the axis of rotation.

- Right-hand rule

A right-hand rule is used to find which way it points along the axis; if the fingers of the right hand are curled to point in the way that the object has rotated, then the thumb of the right hand points in the direction of the vector.

- Rotation around a fixed axis
Sphere rotating around one of its diameters

2 related topics

Alpha

A sphere rotating (spinning) about an axis

Rotation

A sphere rotating (spinning) about an axis
Rotation (angular displacement) of a planar figure around a point
Rotational Orbit v Spin
Relations between rotation axis, plane of orbit and axial tilt (for Earth).
Star trails caused by the Earth's rotation during the camera's long exposure time.
Euler rotations of the Earth. Intrinsic (green), Precession (blue) and Nutation (red)
The principal axes of rotation in space

Rotation is the circular movement of an object around an axis of rotation.

According to the right-hand rule, the direction away from the observer is associated with clockwise rotation and the direction towards the observer with counterclockwise rotation, like a screw.

The angular velocity of the particle at P with respect to the origin O is determined by the perpendicular component of the velocity vector v.

Angular velocity

In physics, angular velocity or rotational velocity ('''

In physics, angular velocity or rotational velocity ('''

The angular velocity of the particle at P with respect to the origin O is determined by the perpendicular component of the velocity vector v.
The orbital angular velocity vector encodes the time rate of change of angular position, as well as the instantaneous plane of angular displacement. In this case (counter-clockwise circular motion) the vector points up.
Schematic construction for addition of angular velocity vectors for rotating frames
Diagram showing Euler frame in green
Position of point P located in the rigid body (shown in blue). Ri is the position with respect to the lab frame, centered at O and ri is the position with respect to the rigid body frame, centered at . The origin of the rigid body frame is at vector position R from the lab frame.
Proving the independence of spin angular velocity from choice of origin

The orientation of angular velocity is conventionally specified by the right-hand rule.

Orbital angular velocity refers to how fast a point object revolves about a fixed origin, i.e. the time rate of change of its angular position relative to the origin.