Rigveda

Rig VedaRigvedicRig-VedaRig VedicSuktaṚgvedaRgvedaRigRigvediRV
The Rigveda (Sanskrit: ऋग्वेद ', from ' "praise" and "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns.wikipedia
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Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
The Rigveda (Sanskrit: ऋग्वेद ', from ' "praise" and "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns.
Sanskrit is traceable to the 2nd millennium BCE in a form known as Vedic Sanskrit, with the Rigveda as the earliest-known composition.

Religious text

scripturescripturesHoly Scripture
It is one of the four sacred canonical texts (śruti) of Hinduism known as the Vedas.
The ‘’Rig Veda’’ – a scripture of Hinduism – is dated to between 1500–1200 BCE.

Mandala 8

RV 88book 8
The eighth and ninth mandalas, comprising hymns of mixed age, account for 15% and 9%, respectively.
The eighth Mandala of the Rigveda has 103 hymns.

Mandala 1

RV 1first bookRig Veda 1
The first and the tenth mandalas are the youngest; they are also the longest books, of 191 suktas each, accounting for 37% of the text.
The first Mandala ("book") of the Rigveda has 191 hymns.

Mandala 10

RV 1010Tenth Mandala
The first and the tenth mandalas are the youngest; they are also the longest books, of 191 suktas each, accounting for 37% of the text.
The tenth mandala of the Rigveda has 191 hymns.

Mandala

mandalasmaṇḍalamandalic
The text is organized in ten "books", or maṇḍalas ("circles"), of varying age and length.
The term appears in the Rigveda as the name of the sections of the work, and Vedic rituals use mandalas such as the Navagraha mandala to this day.

Soma (drink)

Somapava-manaSoma as a ritual drink
The ninth mandala is entirely dedicated to Soma and the Soma ritual.
The Rigveda mentions it, particularly in the Soma Mandala.

Vedic Sanskrit

VedicSanskritRigvedic Sanskrit
The Rigveda (Sanskrit: ऋग्वेद ', from ' "praise" and "knowledge") is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns.
The date of composition of the oldest hymns of the Rigveda is vague at best, generally estimated to between 2000 and 1500 BCE.

Mandala 7

RV 7Book 7
The surviving form of the Rigveda is based on an early Iron Age collection that established the core 'family books' (mandalas 2–7, ordered by author, deity and meter ) and a later redaction, coeval with the redaction of the other Vedas, dating several centuries after the hymns were composed.
The seventh Mandala of the Rigveda ("book 7", "RV 7") has 104 hymns.

Mandala 6

RV 6
The sixth Mandala of the Rigveda has 75 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra.

Dāna

danagenerositygiving
The younger books (Books 1 and 10) in part also deal with philosophical or speculative questions, virtues such as dāna (charity) in society, questions about the origin of the universe and the nature of god, and other metaphysical issues in their hymns.
The Rigveda has the earliest discussion of dāna in the Vedas.

Mandala 9

RV 9Soma Mandalaninth
The eighth and ninth mandalas, comprising hymns of mixed age, account for 15% and 9%, respectively.
The ninth Mandala of the Rigveda, also called the Soma Mandala, has 114 hymns, entirely (although Griffith marks 9.5 as dedicated to the Apris) devoted to, "Purifying Soma", the sacred potion of the Vedic religion.

Vishvamitra

VishwamitraViswamitraKaushika
Composed by the poets of different clans, including famed Vedic rishis (sages) such as Vishvamitra and Vasishtha, these signify the power of prestige therewith to vac (speech, sound), a tradition set in place.
A near-divine being, he is also credited as the author of most of Mandala 3 of the Rigveda, including Gayatri Mantra.

Sanskrit prosody

SlokaChandasChanda
The hymns in the ninth mandala are arranged by both their prosody structure (chanda) and by their length. The meters most used in the are the gayatri (3 verses of 8 syllables), anushtubh (4×8), trishtubh (4×11) and jagati (4×12).
The hymns of Rigveda include the names of metres, which implies that the discipline of Chandas (Sanskrit prosody) emerged in the 2nd-millennium BCE.

Mandala 3

RV 3book threeRV'' 3
The third Mandala of the Rigveda has 62 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra.

Vasishtha

VashisthaVasisthaVasishta
Composed by the poets of different clans, including famed Vedic rishis (sages) such as Vishvamitra and Vasishtha, these signify the power of prestige therewith to vac (speech, sound), a tradition set in place.
Vashishtha is credited as the chief author of Mandala 7 of Rigveda.

Mandala 5

RV 5Fifth Mandala of Ṛkveda (Rigveda)
The fifth Mandala of the Rigveda has 87 hymns.

Atri

AtreyaAtthri
Atri is one of the Saptarishi (seven great Vedic sages) in the Hindu tradition, and the one most mentioned in its scripture Rigveda.

Kashyapa

KashyapKasyapaKaśyapa
He was one of the seven ancient sages (rishi) considered as Saptarishis in Rigveda, numerous Sanskrit texts and Indian mythologies.

Agastya

AgasthyaAgathiyarAgasti
He and his wife Lopamudra are the celebrated authors of hymns 1.165 to 1.191 in the Sanskrit text Rigveda and other Vedic literature.

Gayatri

GayathriGayatrideviGāyatrī
The meters most used in the are the gayatri (3 verses of 8 syllables), anushtubh (4×8), trishtubh (4×11) and jagati (4×12).
Gayatri was the name initially applied to a metre of the Rig Veda consisting of 24 syllables.

Rishi

Rishissageṛṣi
They are attributed and dedicated to a rishi (sage) and his family of students.
In particular, Ṛṣi refers to the authors of the hymns of the Rigveda.

Bharatas (tribe)

BharataBhāratasBharatas
Bharatas were a tribe mentioned in the Rigveda, especially in Mandala 3 attributed to the Bharata sage Vishvamitra.

Vedas

VedicVedaVedic literature
It is one of the four sacred canonical texts (śruti) of Hinduism known as the Vedas. The surviving form of the Rigveda is based on an early Iron Age collection that established the core 'family books' (mandalas 2–7, ordered by author, deity and meter ) and a later redaction, coeval with the redaction of the other Vedas, dating several centuries after the hymns were composed.
There are four Vedas: the Rigveda, the Yajurveda, the Samaveda and the Atharvaveda.

Angiras (sage)

AngirasAngirasaAngirasas
He is described in the Rigveda as a teacher of divine knowledge, a mediator between men and gods, as well as stated in other hymns to be the first of Agni-devas (fire gods).