Ring Nebula

M576720Ring nebula in Lyra
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.wikipedia
70 Related Articles

Planetary nebula

planetary nebulaeplanetarycentral stars of planetary nebulae
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.
The first usage may have occurred during the 1780s with the English astronomer William Herschel who described these nebulae as resembling planets; however, as early as January 1779, the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix described in his observations of the Ring Nebula, "very dim but perfectly outlined; it is as large as Jupiter and resembles a fading planet".

Lyra

Lyramong the starsConstellation of Orpheus
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.
Lyra also hosts the Ring Nebula, the second-discovered and best-known planetary nebula.

Friedrich von Hahn

In 1800, German Count Friedrich von Hahn announced that he had discovered the faint central star at the heart of the nebula a few years earlier.
In 1800, he discovered the central star in M57, the Ring Nebula in the constellation Lyra.

Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix

Antoine DarquierDarquier
Messier's report of his independent discovery of Comet Bode reached fellow French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix two weeks later, who then independently rediscovered the nebula while following the comet.
He has usually been credited with the discovery of the Ring Nebula in 1779, but in fact he independently rediscovered it upon reading a report of Charles Messier regarding Messier's own observations of Comet Bode.

Messier object

MessierMessier CatalogueList of Messier objects

Constellation

constellationsEuropean constellationModern constellation
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.

Interstellar medium

interstellar gasinterstellar matterinterstellar
Such objects are formed when a shell of ionized gas is expelled into the surrounding interstellar medium by a star at in the last stages of its evolution before becoming a white dwarf.

Stellar evolution

evolvedevolvingevolution
Such objects are formed when a shell of ionized gas is expelled into the surrounding interstellar medium by a star at in the last stages of its evolution before becoming a white dwarf.

White dwarf

white dwarfswhite dwarf starcentral star
Such objects are formed when a shell of ionized gas is expelled into the surrounding interstellar medium by a star at in the last stages of its evolution before becoming a white dwarf.

Charles Messier

MessierC/1785 A1C/1780 U2
This nebula was discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier while searching for comets in late January 1779.

Comet

cometslong-period cometJupiter-family comet
This nebula was discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier while searching for comets in late January 1779.

Johann Elert Bode

Johann BodeBodeComet Bode
Messier's report of his independent discovery of Comet Bode reached fellow French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix two weeks later, who then independently rediscovered the nebula while following the comet.

William Herschel

HerschelSir William HerschelWilliam
Messier and German-born astronomer William Herschel speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unresolvable with his telescope.

Amateur astronomy

amateur astronomeramateur astronomersstargazing
In 1864, English amateur astronomer William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases. The nebula lies about 40% of the distance from Beta to Gamma Lyrae, making it an easy target for amateur astronomers to find.

William Huggins

Sir William HugginsHugginsHuggins, Sir William
In 1864, English amateur astronomer William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases.

Spectral line

emission lineabsorption linelines
In 1864, English amateur astronomer William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases.

Vega

Alpha Lyrae2828Botercadent
Messier 57 is located south of the bright star Vega, which forms the northwestern vertex of the Summer Triangle asterism.

Summer Triangle

Chinese constellationsthird star forms a symbolic bridge
Messier 57 is located south of the bright star Vega, which forms the northwestern vertex of the Summer Triangle asterism.

Beta Lyrae

β Lyrβ LyraeSheliak
The nebula lies about 40% of the distance from Beta to Gamma Lyrae, making it an easy target for amateur astronomers to find.

Gamma Lyrae

γ LyrSulafatGamma
The nebula lies about 40% of the distance from Beta to Gamma Lyrae, making it an easy target for amateur astronomers to find.

Aperture

aperture stopapertureslens aperture
It is best observed using a telescope with an aperture of at least 20 cm, but even a 7.5 cm telescope will reveal its elliptical ring shape.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
M57 is 0.787 kpc from Earth.

Apparent magnitude

apparent visual magnitudemagnitudevisual magnitude
It has a visual magnitude of 8.8 and photographic magnitude of 9.7.