Ring of Fire

Pacific Ring of Firecircum-Pacific orogenic beltPacific RimPacific volcanic beltthe Ring of Fire
The Ring of Fire is a major area in the basin of the Pacific Ocean where many earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.wikipedia
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Philippines

đŸ‡”đŸ‡­FilipinoPhilippine
The southern portion is more complex, with a number of smaller tectonic plates in collision with the Pacific plate from the Mariana Islands, the Philippines, Bougainville, Tonga, and New Zealand.
The Philippines' location on the Pacific Ring of Fire and close to the equator makes the Philippines prone to earthquakes and typhoons, but also endows it with abundant natural resources and some of the world's greatest biodiversity.

Plate tectonics

tectonic platetectonic platesplate tectonic
The Ring of Fire is a direct result of plate tectonics: the movement and collisions of lithospheric plates, especially subduction in the northern portion.
The majority of the world's active volcanoes occur along plate boundaries, with the Pacific Plate's Ring of Fire being the most active and widely known today.

Alpide belt

Alp-HimalayanAlpideAlpine Chain
The next most seismically active region (5–6% of earthquakes and 17% of the world's largest earthquakes) is the Alpide belt, which extends from Java to the northern Atlantic Ocean via the Himalayas and southern Europe.
It is the second most seismically active region in the world, after the circum-Pacific belt (the Ring of Fire), with 17% of the world's largest earthquakes.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
The famous and very active San Andreas Fault zone of California is a transform fault which offsets a portion of the East Pacific Rise under the southwestern United States and Mexico; the motion of the fault generates numerous small earthquakes, at multiple times a day, most of which are too small to be felt.
As part of the Ring of Fire, California is subject to tsunamis, floods, droughts, Santa Ana winds, wildfires, landslides on steep terrain, and has several volcanoes.

Aleutian Islands

AleutianAleutiansAleutian Chain
Along the northern portion, the northwestward-moving Pacific plate is being subducted beneath the Aleutian Islands arc. Farther west, the Pacific plate is being subducted along the Kamchatka Peninsula arcs on south past Japan.
The islands, with their 57 volcanoes, form the northernmost part of the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Earthquake

earthquakesseismic activityseismic
The Ring of Fire is a major area in the basin of the Pacific Ocean where many earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.
Most of the world's earthquakes (90%, and 81% of the largest) take place in the 40000 km long, horseshoe-shaped zone called the circum-Pacific seismic belt, known as the Pacific Ring of Fire, which for the most part bounds the Pacific Plate.

Japan

đŸ‡ŻđŸ‡”JPNJapanese
Along the northern portion, the northwestward-moving Pacific plate is being subducted beneath the Aleutian Islands arc. Farther west, the Pacific plate is being subducted along the Kamchatka Peninsula arcs on south past Japan.
The islands of Japan are located in a volcanic zone on the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Indonesia

đŸ‡źđŸ‡©IndonesianRepublic of Indonesia
Indonesia lies between the Ring of Fire along the northeastern islands adjacent to and including New Guinea and the Alpide belt along the south and west from Sumatra, Java, Bali, Flores, and Timor.
It lies on the Pacific Ring of Fire where the Indo-Australian Plate and the Pacific Plate are pushed under the Eurasian plate where they melt at about 100 km deep.

Chile

đŸ‡šđŸ‡±ChileanRepublic of Chile
Many of the active volcanoes are international mountains shared with Chile.
It is situated within the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Pacific Ocean

PacificWestern PacificSouth Pacific
The Ring of Fire is a major area in the basin of the Pacific Ocean where many earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.
Outside the andesite line, volcanism is of the explosive type, and the Pacific Ring of Fire is the world's foremost belt of explosive volcanism.

Santiago

Santiago de ChileSantiago, ChileGreater Santiago
It is situated 82 km northeast of Temuco and 663 km southeast of Santiago, within the borders of ConguillĂ­o National Park.
Due to Santiago's location on the Pacific Ring of Fire at the boundary of the Nazca and South American plates, it experiences a significant amount of tectonic activity.

Juan de Fuca Plate

Juan de FucaJuan de Fuca tectonic plateJuan de Fuca oceanic plate
A portion of the Pacific Plate and the small Juan de Fuca Plate are being subducted beneath the North American Plate. The arc formed by the subduction of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates at the Cascadia subduction zone.
These in turn are part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, a much larger-scale volcanic feature that extends around much of the rim of the Pacific Ocean.

Volcanic belt

beltmagmatic beltvolcanic mountain belts
In a large 40,000 km horseshoe shape, it is associated with a nearly continuous series of oceanic trenches, volcanic arcs, and volcanic belts and plate movements.
Pacific Ring of Fire

Cotopaxi

Cotopaxi Volcano Cotopaxi volcano
Cotopaxi is a stratovolcano in the Andes, located about 50 km south of Quito, Ecuador, South America.
On a clear day, Cotopaxi is clearly visible on the skyline from Quito and is part of the chain of volcanoes around the Pacific plate known as the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Queen Charlotte Fault

Fairweather Fault
The active Queen Charlotte Fault on the west coast of the Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, has generated three large earthquakes during the 20th century: a magnitude 7 event in 1929; a magnitude 8.1 in 1949 (Canada's largest recorded earthquake); and a magnitude 7.4 in 1970.
Ring of Fire

Pacific Plate

PacificPacific tectonic platePacific crust
A portion of the Pacific Plate and the small Juan de Fuca Plate are being subducted beneath the North American Plate.
A geologic map of the Pacific Ocean seabed shows not only the geologic sequences, and associated Ring of Fire zones on the ocean's perimeters, but the various ages of the seafloor in a stairstep fashion, youngest to oldest, the oldest being consumed into the Asian oceanic trenches.

Cascade Volcanoes

Cascade Volcanic ArcCascadeCascade Arc
Both monitor volcanos in the United States; in the western United States lies the Cascade Volcanic Arc.
The Cascade Volcanoes are part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, the ring of volcanoes and associated mountains around the Pacific Ocean.

Andean Volcanic Belt

Southern Volcanic ZoneCentral Volcanic ZoneQuaternary Andean volcanoes
All Cenozoic volcanoes of Bolivia are part of the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andean Volcanic Belt that results due to processes involved in the subduction of the Nazca Plate under the South American Plate.
The Geophysics Institute at the National Polytechnic School in Quito, Ecuador houses an international team of seismologists and volcanologists whose responsibility is to monitor Ecuador's numerous active volcanoes in the Andean Volcanic Belt and the GalĂĄpagos Islands, all of which is part of the Ring of Fire.

Castle Rock (volcano)

Castle Rock
Hot springs are at some volcanoes, while 10 volcanoes in British Columbia appear related to seismic activity since 1975, including: the Silverthrone Caldera, Mount Meager massif, Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field, Mount Garibaldi, Mount Cayley massif, Castle Rock, The Volcano, Mount Edziza, Hoodoo Mountain, Crow Lagoon, and Nazko Cone.
Castle Rock is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes and is in the Klastline Group, Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province and last erupted in the Pleistocene.

Volcano

volcanicvolcanoesextinct volcano
It has 452 volcanoes (more than 75% of the world's active and dormant volcanoes).
For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates.

Cascadia subduction zone

CascadiaCascadia Abyssal PlainCascadia fault line
The arc formed by the subduction of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates at the Cascadia subduction zone.
In the 1980s, geophysicists Tom Heaton and Hiroo Kanamori of Caltech compared the generally quiet Cascadia to more active subduction zones elsewhere in the Ring of Fire.

2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami

2004 Indian Ocean earthquake2004 Indian Ocean tsunami2004 tsunami
2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami
Indonesia lies between the Pacific Ring of Fire along the north-eastern islands adjacent to New Guinea, and the Alpide belt that runs along the south and west from Sumatra, Java, Bali, Flores to Timor.

Ecuador

đŸ‡Ș🇹ECUEcuadorian
Cotopaxi is a stratovolcano in the Andes, located about 50 km south of Quito, Ecuador, South America.
The Geophysics Institute monitors over the country's volcanoes in the Andes Mountains of Ecuador and in the GalĂĄpagos Islands, all of which is part of the Ring of Fire.

Pumice

pumice stonepumiceouspumicite
The last eruption of this dominantly basaltic volcano in 1707 ejected andesitic pumice and formed a large new crater on the east flank.
Pumice can be found in the Kamchatka Peninsula area due to the Pacific volcanic belt.

Lightning Peak (British Columbia)

Lightning Peak
Volcanoes in this belt include Mount Noel, the Clisbako Caldera Complex, Lightning Peak, Black Dome Mountain, and many lava flows.
Like most volcanoes in British Columbia, Lightning Peak is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, that includes over 160 active volcanoes.