Riverfront Stadium

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Riverfront Stadium, also known as Cinergy Field from 1996 to 2002, was a multi-purpose stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States that was the home of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball from 1970 through 2002 and the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League from 1970 to 1999.wikipedia
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Cincinnati Reds

RedsCincinnatiCIN
Riverfront Stadium, also known as Cinergy Field from 1996 to 2002, was a multi-purpose stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States that was the home of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball from 1970 through 2002 and the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League from 1970 to 1999.
The team plays its home games at Great American Ball Park, which opened in 2003 replacing Riverfront Stadium.

1970 Major League Baseball season

19701970 MLB seasonpennant race
Riverfront Stadium, also known as Cinergy Field from 1996 to 2002, was a multi-purpose stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States that was the home of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball from 1970 through 2002 and the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League from 1970 to 1999.
All-Star Game, July 14 at Riverfront Stadium: National League, 5–4 (12 innings); Carl Yastrzemski, MVP

Cincinnati Bengals

CincinnatiBengalsCIN
Riverfront Stadium, also known as Cinergy Field from 1996 to 2002, was a multi-purpose stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States that was the home of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball from 1970 through 2002 and the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League from 1970 to 1999.
He ultimately chose the former when a deal between the city, Hamilton County, and Major League Baseball's Cincinnati Reds (who were seeking a replacement for the obsolete Crosley Field) was struck that resulted in an agreement to build a multipurpose stadium which could host both baseball and football games.

1970 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

1970All-Star Game1970 All-Star Game
Two weeks later on July 14, 1970, Riverfront hosted the 1970 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.
The game was played on the evening of July 14, 1970, at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, home of the Cincinnati Reds of the National League, and resulted in a 5–4 victory for the NL.

Great American Ball Park

CincinnatiCincinnati, Ohio28,395
In 2001, to make room for Great American Ball Park, the seating capacity at Cinergy Field was reduced to 39,000.
It opened in 2003, replacing Cinergy Field (formerly Riverfront Stadium), their home field from 1970 to 2002.

Multi-purpose stadium

multi-purposemulti-use stadiummultipurpose stadium
Riverfront was a multi-purpose, circular "cookie-cutter" stadium, one of many built in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s as communities sought to save money by having their football and baseball teams share the same facility.
It was followed during the 1960s and 1970s by Shea Stadium, Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium, Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum, the Astrodome, Jack Murphy Stadium, Riverfront Stadium, Busch Memorial Stadium, Three Rivers Stadium, Veterans Stadium, and the Kingdome.

Cinergy

Cincinnati Gas and Electric CompanyCincinnati Gas & ElectricCincinnati Gas & Electric Company
In September 1996, Riverfront Stadium was renamed "Cinergy Field" in a sponsorship deal with Greater Cincinnati energy company Cinergy.
In 1996, Riverfront Stadium in Downtown Cincinnati was renamed Cinergy Field in a sponsorship deal with Cinergy.

Roy Rogers

The Roy Rogers ShowRogersthe famous cowboy
The site Riverfront Stadium sat on originally included the 2nd Street tenement, birthplace and boyhood home of cowboy singer and actor Roy Rogers, who joked that he was born "somewhere between second base and center field."
The family lived in a tenement on 2nd Street, where Riverfront Stadium would later be constructed (Rogers later joked that he was born at second base).

Veterans Stadium

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Riverfront, Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta, Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Shea Stadium in New York and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. all opened within a few years of each other and were largely indistinguishable from one another; in particular, it was often confused with fellow Ohio River cookie-cutter Three Rivers Stadium by sportscasters because of the two stadium's similar names and similar designs.
As was the case with other cities where this dual approach was tried (other examples include RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C.; Shea Stadium in New York City, the Astrodome in Houston; Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta; Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis; Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati; and Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh), the fundamentally different sizes and shapes of the playing fields made the stadium inadequate to the needs of either sport.

1970 NFL season

19701970 season1971
Riverfront Stadium, also known as Cinergy Field from 1996 to 2002, was a multi-purpose stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States that was the home of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball from 1970 through 2002 and the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League from 1970 to 1999.
Cincinnati and Pittsburgh opened new stadiums: Riverfront Stadium and Three Rivers Stadium.

Three Rivers Stadium

Pittsburghat homenew facility
Riverfront, Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta, Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Shea Stadium in New York and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. all opened within a few years of each other and were largely indistinguishable from one another; in particular, it was often confused with fellow Ohio River cookie-cutter Three Rivers Stadium by sportscasters because of the two stadium's similar names and similar designs.
Three Rivers Stadium was similar in design to other stadiums built in the 1960s and 1970s, such as Riverfront Stadium, the Houston Astrodome, and Busch Memorial Stadium, which were designed as multi-purpose facilities to maximize efficiency.

Crosley Field

Redland FieldRedland ParkLeague Park
The Reds moved to Riverfront Stadium midway through the 1970 season, after spending over 86 years at the intersection of Findlay Street and Western Avenue – the last 57½ of those years at Crosley Field.
The "Findlay and Western" intersection was the home field of the Reds from 1884 until mid-season 1970, when the team moved to Riverfront Stadium.

Shea Stadium

SheaNew Yorkhome
Riverfront, Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta, Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Shea Stadium in New York and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. all opened within a few years of each other and were largely indistinguishable from one another; in particular, it was often confused with fellow Ohio River cookie-cutter Three Rivers Stadium by sportscasters because of the two stadium's similar names and similar designs.
On the plus side, Shea always used a natural grass surface, in contrast to other multi-purpose stadiums such as Three Rivers Stadium, Veterans Stadium, and Riverfront Stadium, which were built in the same era and style and had artificial turf.

Pete Rose

Peter Edward RoseRoseRose, Pete
This game is best remembered for the often-replayed collision at home plate between Reds star Pete Rose and catcher Ray Fosse of the Cleveland Indians.
Brand-new Riverfront Stadium had been open for only two weeks on July 14, 1970 when Rose was involved in one of the most infamous plays in All-Star Game history.

Artificial turf

Artificialartificial grassartificial pitch
Baseball purists disliked Riverfront's artificial turf, but Reds' Manager Sparky Anderson and General Manager Bob Howsam took advantage of it by encouraging speed and line drive hitting that could produce doubles, triples and high-bouncing infield hits.
Teams who chose to play on artificial surfaces outdoors did so because of the reduced maintenance cost, especially in colder climates with urban multi-purpose "cookie cutter" stadiums such as Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium, Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Stadium and Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium.

1976 World Series

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The Reds had only won three pennants in their final 39 years at Crosley Field (1939, 1940, 1961) but made the World Series in Riverfront's first year (1970) and a total of four times in the stadium's first seven years, with the Reds winning back-to-back championships in 1975 and 1976.
Game 1, played at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium, marked the first time the DH was used in a National League ballpark.

Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium

RFK StadiumD.C. StadiumRFK Memorial Stadium
Riverfront, Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Busch Memorial Stadium in St. Louis, Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta, Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Shea Stadium in New York and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. all opened within a few years of each other and were largely indistinguishable from one another; in particular, it was often confused with fellow Ohio River cookie-cutter Three Rivers Stadium by sportscasters because of the two stadium's similar names and similar designs.
It was the first to use the so-called "cookie-cutter" concept, an approach also used in Philadelphia, New York, Houston, Atlanta, St. Louis, San Diego, Cincinnati, Oakland, and Pittsburgh.

Freezer Bowl

AFC Championship1981 AFC Championship Game
The game became known as the Freezer Bowl and was won by the Bengals over the San Diego Chargers, 27–7.
The game was played on January 10, 1982 at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium, and televised by NBC, with announcers Dick Enberg and Merlin Olsen.

Nippert Stadium

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After playing for two seasons at Nippert Stadium on the University of Cincinnati campus, the Bengals built on the Reds' success in the stadium's first year when they recorded their first winning season and playoff appearance in 1970, just their third year of existence.
1968 – Nippert was the first home of the AFL's expansion Cincinnati Bengals while the city constructed Riverfront Stadium, which opened in 1970.

Johnny Bench

Catcher Johnny Bench and first baseman Tony Pérez played here.
The Cincinnati Reds proclaimed Saturday, September 17, 1983, "Johnny Bench Night" at Riverfront Stadium, in which he hit his 389th and final home run, a line drive to left in the third inning before a record crowd.

Paul Brown Stadium

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When Paul Brown Stadium opened in 2000, the Jungle theme was incorporated into the stadium design.
Previously the Bengals and the Reds shared tenancy of Riverfront Stadium (Cinergy Field), but both teams complained that the aging multipurpose facility lacked modern amenities and other things necessary for small-market teams to survive.

AFC Championship Game

AFC ChampionAFC ChampionshipAFC Championships
Perhaps the most memorable football game at Riverfront was the AFC Championship on January 10, 1982.

1990 World Series

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The World Series would return in 1990, with Cincinnati winning the first two of a four-game sweep of the Oakland Athletics at Riverfront.
This was the last of five World Series to be played at Riverfront Stadium (,,, and 1990), which was closed and demolished in 2002.

Tony Pérez

Tony PerezAtanacio "Tony" Pérez Rigal
Catcher Johnny Bench and first baseman Tony Pérez played here.
His final career hit and RBI came on October 4, 1986 at Riverfront Stadium when he hit a solo home run off San Diego Padres pitcher Ed Whitson in a 10–7 Reds win.