Robbery

armed robberyrobberiesrobbermuggingarmed robberiesmuggedheistrobbedrobbersaggravated robbery
Robbery is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear.wikipedia
1,699 Related Articles

Theft

thiefthievesstealing
According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault. Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses).

Shoplifting

shopliftershopliftshoplifted
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.
Shoplifting is distinct from burglary (theft by breaking into a closed store), robbery (stealing by threatening or engaging in violent behavior), or armed robbery (stealing by using a weapon).

Larceny

grand larcenypetty larcenylarcenies
According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.
The crime of larceny has been abolished in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland due to breaking up the generalised crime of larceny into the specific crimes of burglary, robbery, fraud, theft, and related crimes.

Violent crime

violent crimesviolentcrime of violence
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.
Typically, violent criminals includes aircraft hijackers, bank robbers, muggers, burglars, terrorists, carjackers, rapists, kidnappers, torturers, active shooters, murderers, gangsters, drug cartels, and others.

Motor vehicle theft

auto theftcar theftgrand theft auto
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.

Carjacking

hijackingcarjackcarjacked
Carjacking is the act of stealing a car from a victim by force.
Carjacking is a robbery in which the item taken over is a motor vehicle.

Crime

criminalcriminalscriminal offence
Robbery is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear.
Similarly, assault and violent robbery involved trespass as to the pater's property (so, for example, the rape of a slave could become the subject of compensation to the pater as having trespassed on his "property"), and breach of such laws created a vinculum juris (an obligation of law) that only the payment of monetary compensation (modern "damages") could discharge.

Extortion

extortextortingextorted
Extortion is the threat to do something illegal, or the offer to not do something illegal, in the event that goods are not given, primarily using words instead of actions.
Extortion is distinguished from robbery.

Assault

aggravated assaultassault with a deadly weaponsimple assault
According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.

Burglary

breaking and enteringburglariescat burglar
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.
Commission of a burglary with the intention or result of confronting persons on the premises may constitute an aggravated offense known as "home invasion." Taking or attempting to take property by force or fear from persons on the premises also constitutes the offense of robbery.

Steaming (crime)

steamingmugging
Criminal slang for robbery includes "blagging" (armed robbery, usually of a bank) or "stick-up" (derived from the verbal command to robbery targets to raise their hands in the air), and "steaming" (organized robbery on underground train systems).
It is often used interchangeably with mugging, referring to a specific subcategory of that crime.

Theft Act 1968

Theft Acts
It is created by section 8(1) of the Theft Act 1968 which reads: The common law offence of robbery was abolished for all purposes not relating to offences committed before 1 January 1969 by section 32(1)(a) of the Theft Act 1968.
Section 8(1) creates the offence of robbery.

Larceny Act 1916

The words "or immediately after" that appeared in section 23(1)(b) of the Larceny Act 1916 were deliberately omitted from section 8(1).
Section 23 provided maximum penalties for a number of offences of robbery and aggravated robbery.

Life imprisonment in Canada

life imprisonmentlife in prisonlife sentence
In Canada, the Criminal Code makes robbery an indictable offence, subject to a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.
Offences under the Criminal Code that carry a maximum penalty of life imprisonment in Canada (with a parole ineligibility period of between 7 years and 25 years) include treason, piracy, mutiny, aircraft hijacking, endangering the safety of an aircraft or an airport, endangering the safety of a ship or fixed platform, refusing to disperse after a riot proclamation, arson (disregard for human life), robbery, kidnapping, break and enter with intent, attempted murder, accessory after the fact to murder, conspiracy to commit murder, manslaughter, causing death by street racing, impaired driving causing death, causing death by criminal negligence, killing an unborn child in the act of birth, and aggravated sexual assault.

Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act, 2001

Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act 2001
It is created by section 14(1) of the Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act, 2001, which provides:

Bonnie and Clyde

Clyde BarrowBonnie ParkerBonnie & Clyde
Robberies have been depicted, sometimes graphically, in various forms of media, and several robbers have become pop icons, such as Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger.
Barrow had some legitimate jobs during 1927 through 1929, but he also cracked safes, robbed stores, and stole cars.

Possession of stolen goods

handling stolen goodshandlingstolen goods
Dishonestly dealing with property stolen during a robbery will constitute an offence of handling.
It includes property that was taken by theft or robbery as well as property taken by breaches of trust including embezzlement, fraud and willful imposition.

Theft Act (Northern Ireland) 1969

It is created by section 8 of the Theft Act (Northern Ireland) 1969.
This section creates the offence of robbery.

Criminal Justice Act 2003

Criminal Justice Act20032003 c. 44
It is also subject to the mandatory sentencing regime under the Criminal Justice Act 2003.
The case in question involved four men accused of an armed robbery at Heathrow Airport in February 2004.

Common law offence

common law crimecommon law offencescommon law crimes
The common law offence of robbery was abolished for all purposes not relating to offences committed before 1 January 1969 by section 32(1)(a) of the Theft Act 1968.

Common law

common-lawcourts of common lawcommon
According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.

Pickpocketing

pickpocketpickpocketspick pocket
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.

Misdemeanor

misdemeanourpetty crimemisdemeanors
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.

Felony

feloniesfelonfelons
Robbery is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, pickpocketing, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two.

Hybrid offence

either waytriable either wayeither way offence
Under English law, most forms of theft are triable either way, whereas robbery is triable only on indictment.