Robert Alan Aurthur

Robert Alan Aurthur (June 10, 1922 – November 20, 1978) was an American screenwriter, film director, and film producer.wikipedia
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Goodyear Television Playhouse

Goodyear PlayhouseGoodyear TV PlayhouseThe Goodyear Television Playhouse
He followed with teleplays for Campbell Playhouse (1954), Justice (1954), Goodyear Television Playhouse (1953–54) and Producers' Showcase (1955).
Producer Fred Coe nurtured and encouraged a group of young, mostly unknown writers that included Robert Alan Aurthur, George Baxt, Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Howard Richardson, Tad Mosel and Gore Vidal.

The Philco Television Playhouse

The Philco-Goodyear Television PlayhousePhilco TV PlayhousePhilco Playhouse
One of his four 1951-55 plays for Philco Television Playhouse was the Emmy-nominated A Man Is Ten Feet Tall (1955), with Don Murray and Sidney Poitier, which was adapted two years later as the theatrical film, Edge of the City (1957) with Poitier and John Cassavetes.
The series launched the television writing careers of Robert Alan Aurthur, Paddy Chayefsky, Sumner Locke Elliott, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, William Templeton, Arnold Schulman, and Gore Vidal.

Edge of the City

One of his four 1951-55 plays for Philco Television Playhouse was the Emmy-nominated A Man Is Ten Feet Tall (1955), with Don Murray and Sidney Poitier, which was adapted two years later as the theatrical film, Edge of the City (1957) with Poitier and John Cassavetes.
Robert Alan Aurthur's screenplay was expanded from his original script, staged as the final episode of Philco Television Playhouse, A Man Is Ten Feet Tall (1955), also featuring Poitier.

Playhouse 90

He wrote two teleplays for Playhouse 90, and one of these, A Sound of Different Drummers (3 October 1957), borrowed so heavily from Ray Bradbury's
Writers for the series included Robert Alan Aurthur, Rod Serling, Whitfield Cook, David E. Durston, Sumner Locke Elliott, Horton Foote, Frank D. Gilroy, Roger O. Hirson, A. E. Hotchner, Loring Mandel, Abby Mann, JP Miller, Paul Monash, and Leslie Stevens.

Mister Peepers

Mr. Peepers
In the early years of television, he wrote for Studio One and then moved on to write episodes of Mister Peepers (1952–53).

All That Jazz (film)

All That Jazz1979 filmAll That Jazz'' (film)
As the writer-producer of All That Jazz (1979), he received two posthumous Academy Award nominations.
The screenplay, by Robert Alan Aurthur and Fosse, is a semi-autobiographical fantasy based on aspects of Fosse's life and career as a dancer, choreographer and director.

Fahrenheit 451

novel of the same nameBeattyFaber
Fahrenheit 451 that Bradbury sued.
Playhouse 90 broadcast "A Sound of Different Drummers" on CBS in 1957, written by Robert Alan Aurthur.

Shadows (1959 film)

ShadowsShadows'' (1959 film)
He was one of the writers on Spring Reunion (1957), notable as Betty Hutton's last movie, following with Warlock (1959), and his earlier association with Cassavetes led to script contributions on the actor's directorial debut with Shadows (1959).
Cassavetes shot new scenes in 1959 using a script he co-wrote with Robert Alan Aurthur.

Warlock (1959 film)

Warlock1959film adaptation of the same title
He was one of the writers on Spring Reunion (1957), notable as Betty Hutton's last movie, following with Warlock (1959), and his earlier association with Cassavetes led to script contributions on the actor's directorial debut with Shadows (1959).
Released by Twentieth Century Fox and shot in DeLuxe Color and CinemaScope, the film was adapted from Hall's novel for the screen by Robert Alan Aurthur.

Bea Arthur

Beatrice ArthurBea Arthur on Broadway, Just Between FriendsBeau Arthur
Aurthur served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. He was the first husband of actress Beatrice Arthur, who also served in the Marines; they divorced in 1950 and had no children.
Her first marriage took place during her time in the military, when she married fellow Marine Robert Alan Aurthur, later a screenwriter, television, and film producer and director, whose surname she took and kept (though with a modified spelling).

Grand Prix (1966 film)

Grand Prix1966film Grand Prix
After an uncredited contribution to Lilith (1964), he scripted John Frankenheimer's Grand Prix (1966).

The Lost Man

The Lost Man (soundtrack)
He wrote and directed The Lost Man (1969) about a black militant (Sidney Poitier).
The Lost Man is a 1969 American crime film, written and directed by Robert Alan Aurthur, loosely based on F.L. Green's novel Odd Man Out, which was made originally into a 1947 film with James Mason.

Studio One (U.S. TV series)

Studio OneStudio One in HollywoodStudio One Summer Theater
In the early years of television, he wrote for Studio One and then moved on to write episodes of Mister Peepers (1952–53).

Producers' Showcase

Producers’ Showcasetelevision production
He followed with teleplays for Campbell Playhouse (1954), Justice (1954), Goodyear Television Playhouse (1953–54) and Producers' Showcase (1955).

Don Murray (actor)

Don Murray
One of his four 1951-55 plays for Philco Television Playhouse was the Emmy-nominated A Man Is Ten Feet Tall (1955), with Don Murray and Sidney Poitier, which was adapted two years later as the theatrical film, Edge of the City (1957) with Poitier and John Cassavetes.

Sidney Poitier

Sir Sidney PoitierSidney Poitiethe actor with a similar name
One of his four 1951-55 plays for Philco Television Playhouse was the Emmy-nominated A Man Is Ten Feet Tall (1955), with Don Murray and Sidney Poitier, which was adapted two years later as the theatrical film, Edge of the City (1957) with Poitier and John Cassavetes.

John Cassavetes

CassavetesJohnJohn Cassavettes
One of his four 1951-55 plays for Philco Television Playhouse was the Emmy-nominated A Man Is Ten Feet Tall (1955), with Don Murray and Sidney Poitier, which was adapted two years later as the theatrical film, Edge of the City (1957) with Poitier and John Cassavetes.

Ray Bradbury

BradburyEmbroidery[Ray] Bradbury
He wrote two teleplays for Playhouse 90, and one of these, A Sound of Different Drummers (3 October 1957), borrowed so heavily from Ray Bradbury's

Betty Hutton

Satins and Spurs
He was one of the writers on Spring Reunion (1957), notable as Betty Hutton's last movie, following with Warlock (1959), and his earlier association with Cassavetes led to script contributions on the actor's directorial debut with Shadows (1959).

Lilith (film)

Lilith LilithLilith'' (film)
After an uncredited contribution to Lilith (1964), he scripted John Frankenheimer's Grand Prix (1966).

John Frankenheimer

Frankenheimer John FrankenheimerJohn Frankenheimer Productions
After an uncredited contribution to Lilith (1964), he scripted John Frankenheimer's Grand Prix (1966).

British Film Institute

BFIBFI Film FundBritish Film Institute (BFI)
Robert Alan Aurthur - BFI database entry

Screenwriter

writertelevision writerscriptwriter