Robert B. Leighton

LeightonRobert LeightonBob Leighton
Robert Benjamin Leighton (September 10, 1919 – March 9, 1997) was a prominent American experimental physicist who spent his professional career at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).wikipedia
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The Feynman Lectures on Physics

Feynman Lectures on PhysicsSix Easy PiecesFeynman lectures
After Richard's Lectures in Physics course, in the early 1960s, Leighton spent over two years reworking the tape-recorded text into publishable form: The Feynman Lectures on Physics, which were published in 1964 and 1966, and which have enjoyed perennial success ever since.
The book's co-authors are Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands.

Richard Feynman

FeynmanRichard P. FeynmanRichard Phillips Feynman
Leighton and Richard Feynman were close personal friends.
The Feynman Lectures on Physics occupied two physicists, Robert B. Leighton and Matthew Sands, as part-time co-authors for several years.

Babcock Model

Babcockdynamo model of the solar cyclemagnetic coiling sunspot theory
Leighton himself soon realized that solar magneto-convection cells would lead to an effective diffusion of flux on the solar surface (now called Leighton diffusion), and he included it in a dynamo model of the solar cycle.
This oscillation is known as the Babcock-Leighton dynamo cycle, amounting to the oscillatory exchange of energy between poloidal and toroidal solar magnetic field ingredients.

Two-Micron Sky Survey

The resulting Two-Micron Sky Survey, published in 1969, contained 5,612 infrared sources, the vast majority of which had been previously uncataloged.
Two-Micron Sky Survey, or IRC, or Caltech infrared catalog is the astronomical catalogue of the infrared sources published in the 1969 by Neugebauer and Leighton.

Ralph Leighton

Ralph
One of Leighton's sons, Ralph, also collaborated with Feynman on several books.
He is the son of the late Caltech physicist Robert B. Leighton, who was also a close friend of Feynman.

Gerry Neugebauer

Gerald NeugebauerNeugebauer
Starting in 1965, he and Gerry Neugebauer used the new telescope to sweep the roughly 70 percent of the sky visible from Mt. Wilson Observatory, collecting the data as squiggles on a strip-chart recorder.
Together with Robert B. Leighton, he completed the Two-Micron Sky Survey, the first infrared survey of the sky, which cataloged more than 5,000 infrared sources.

Mount Wilson Observatory

Hooker TelescopeMount WilsonMt. Wilson Observatory
Starting in 1965, he and Gerry Neugebauer used the new telescope to sweep the roughly 70 percent of the sky visible from Mt. Wilson Observatory, collecting the data as squiggles on a strip-chart recorder.
In 1968, the first large-area near-IR (2.2 µm) survey of the sky was conducted by Gerry Neugebauer and Robert B. Leighton using a 157 cm reflecting dish they had built in the early 1960s.

James Craig Watson Medal

Watson Medal
Leighton shared the Rumford Prize in 1986 for advancements in Infrared Astronomy, and won the James Craig Watson Medal in 1988, for his work as creator and exploiter of new instruments and techniques that opened whole new areas of astronomy — solar oscillations, infrared surveys, spun telescopes, and large millimeter-wave reflectors.

Rumford Prize

Rumford Premium PrizeRumford Premium
Leighton shared the Rumford Prize in 1986 for advancements in Infrared Astronomy, and won the James Craig Watson Medal in 1988, for his work as creator and exploiter of new instruments and techniques that opened whole new areas of astronomy — solar oscillations, infrared surveys, spun telescopes, and large millimeter-wave reflectors.

Matthew Sands

SandsSands M.
He helped Feynman and Robert B. Leighton write the 1964 physics textbook Feynman Lectures on Physics, based upon the lectures given by Feynman to undergraduate students at Caltech between 1961 and 1963.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Robert Benjamin Leighton (September 10, 1919 – March 9, 1997) was a prominent American experimental physicist who spent his professional career at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

Physicist

physicistsresearch physicistengineer and physicist
Robert Benjamin Leighton (September 10, 1919 – March 9, 1997) was a prominent American experimental physicist who spent his professional career at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

California Institute of Technology

CaltechCalifornia Institute of Technology (Caltech)Cal Tech
Robert Benjamin Leighton (September 10, 1919 – March 9, 1997) was a prominent American experimental physicist who spent his professional career at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

Cosmic ray

cosmic rayscosmic radiationcosmic-ray
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Particle physics

high energy physicsparticle physicisthigh-energy physics
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Solar physics

solar physicistsolarExtreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Planet

planetsFormer classification of planetsplanemo
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Extremely high frequency

millimeter wavemillimeter-waveEHF
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Terahertz radiation

terahertzTHzT-Ray
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
His work over the years spanned solid state physics, cosmic ray physics, the beginnings of modern particle physics, solar physics, the planets, infrared astronomy, and millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astronomy.

Detroit

Detroit, MichiganDetroit, MICity of Detroit
Leighton was born in Detroit, where his father made precision dies for an automobile company.

Seattle

Seattle, WashingtonSeattle, WACity of Seattle
After moving to Seattle the family broke up, and his father returned to Detroit.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles, CALos Angeles, United States
His mother moved to downtown Los Angeles, where she worked as a maid in a hotel.

Los Angeles City College

Los Angeles Junior CollegeLos Angeles CCL.A. City College
Leighton grew up in Los Angeles and attended Los Angeles City College.

Specific heat capacity

specific heatheat capacityspecific heat capacities
He then switched to physics and went on to obtain his M.S. in 1944, and his Ph.D. in 1947 with a thesis on the specific heat of face-centered cubic crystals.