Robert Cary (died c. 1431)

Robert Cary
Sir Robert Cary (died c. 1431) of Cockington, Devon, was twelve times Member of Parliament for Devon, in 1407, 1410, 1411, May 1413, April 1414, Mar. 1416, 1417, 1419, May 1421, 1422, 1425 and 1426.wikipedia
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Devon (UK Parliament constituency)

DevonDevon (seat 1/2)Devonshire
Sir Robert Cary (died c. 1431) of Cockington, Devon, was twelve times Member of Parliament for Devon, in 1407, 1410, 1411, May 1413, April 1414, Mar. 1416, 1417, 1419, May 1421, 1422, 1425 and 1426. He was the eldest son and heir of Sir John Cary (died 1395), Chief Baron of the Exchequer and twice Member of Parliament for Devon by his wife Margaret Holleway, daughter and heiress of Robert Holleway, of Holleway in the parish of North Lew, Devon. By his first wife Cary had one son, Sir Philip Cary (died 1437), MP for Devon in 1433.

John Cary (died 1395)

John CaryCarySir John Cary
He was the eldest son and heir of Sir John Cary (died 1395), Chief Baron of the Exchequer and twice Member of Parliament for Devon by his wife Margaret Holleway, daughter and heiress of Robert Holleway, of Holleway in the parish of North Lew, Devon.

Robert Chalons

Sir Robert Chalons
Indeed, in 1399 his father's former estates were granted by Henry IV to Sir Robert Chalons, MP, a member of the royal household.
These were however gradually lost to legal and illegal challenges by Sir Robert Cary and associates so that by 1445 he held none.

Manor of Powderham

Powderham
In December 1415 Richard Courtenay, who by then had inherited Powderham and other estates following the death of his father, died at the Siege of Harfleur, leaving his 11-year-old nephew Philip Courtenay (1404–1463) as his heir. His first wife was Margaret Courtenay, a daughter of Sir Philip Courtenay (1340–1406), of Powderham, Devon, son of Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (1303–1377) by his wife Margaret de Bohun (died 1391), daughter and heiress of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (1298–1322) by his wife Elizabeth, a daughter of King Edward I.
Much of his time was spent away from Powderham, which manor together with Chivelstone, he leased to his brother-in-law Sir Robert Cary (d.

Philip Cary (MP for Devon)

Philip CaryPhilip Cary (MP, died 1437)Sir Philip Cary
By his first wife Cary had one son, Sir Philip Cary (died 1437), MP for Devon in 1433.
He was the son and heir of Sir Robert Cary (died c. 1431) of Cockington, Devon, 12 times Member of Parliament for Devon, by his first wife Margaret Courtenay, a daughter of Sir Philip Courtenay (1340–1406), of Powderham, Devon, 4th (or 5th or 6th) son of Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (1303–1377) by his wife Margaret de Bohun (died 1391), daughter and heiress of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (1298–1322) by his wife Elizabeth Plantagenet, a daughter of King Edward I.

Philip Courtenay (died 1406)

Sir Philip CourtenayPhilip CourtenayPhilip de Courtenay
His first wife was Margaret Courtenay, a daughter of Sir Philip Courtenay (1340–1406), of Powderham, Devon, son of Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (1303–1377) by his wife Margaret de Bohun (died 1391), daughter and heiress of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (1298–1322) by his wife Elizabeth, a daughter of King Edward I.

William Hankford

William HankefordSir William Hankford (c1350-1423)
His second wife was Jane Hankford (died 1447) a daughter of Sir William Hankford (c.

Cockington

Cockington Court
Sir Robert Cary (died c. 1431) of Cockington, Devon, was twelve times Member of Parliament for Devon, in 1407, 1410, 1411, May 1413, April 1414, Mar. 1416, 1417, 1419, May 1421, 1422, 1425 and 1426.

Member of parliament

MPMemberMembers of Parliament
Sir Robert Cary (died c. 1431) of Cockington, Devon, was twelve times Member of Parliament for Devon, in 1407, 1410, 1411, May 1413, April 1414, Mar. 1416, 1417, 1419, May 1421, 1422, 1425 and 1426. He was the eldest son and heir of Sir John Cary (died 1395), Chief Baron of the Exchequer and twice Member of Parliament for Devon by his wife Margaret Holleway, daughter and heiress of Robert Holleway, of Holleway in the parish of North Lew, Devon.

Esquire

Esq.EsqArmiger
He was an esquire in the households of King Richard II (1377–1399) and of the latter's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (c. In 1391 he became an esquire in the household of King Richard II and in 1392 was also an esquire in the household of Richard's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter, 1st Earl of Huntingdon (c.

Richard II of England

Richard IIKing Richard IIKing Richard II of England
He was an esquire in the households of King Richard II (1377–1399) and of the latter's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (c.

John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter

John HollandEarl of HuntingdonJohn Holland, Earl of Huntingdon
He was an esquire in the households of King Richard II (1377–1399) and of the latter's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (c. In 1391 he became an esquire in the household of King Richard II and in 1392 was also an esquire in the household of Richard's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter, 1st Earl of Huntingdon (c.

Chief Baron of the Exchequer

Lord Chief Baron of the ExchequerLord Chief BaronBarons of the Exchequer
He was the eldest son and heir of Sir John Cary (died 1395), Chief Baron of the Exchequer and twice Member of Parliament for Devon by his wife Margaret Holleway, daughter and heiress of Robert Holleway, of Holleway in the parish of North Lew, Devon.

Northlew

North LewCrowdenEast Kimber
He was the eldest son and heir of Sir John Cary (died 1395), Chief Baron of the Exchequer and twice Member of Parliament for Devon by his wife Margaret Holleway, daughter and heiress of Robert Holleway, of Holleway in the parish of North Lew, Devon.

Merciless Parliament

15th1388 ParliamentParliament of 1388
Due to his support for King Richard II against Henry Bolingbroke, in 1388 Sir John Cary was attainted by the Merciless Parliament, which resulted in his banishment to Ireland and the confiscation of his lands. The Parliament of 1398 annulled the Acts of the Merciless Parliament of 1388, and thus Robert Cary recovered some of his father's forfeited estates.

Henry IV of England

Henry IVKing Henry IVHenry Bolingbroke
Due to his support for King Richard II against Henry Bolingbroke, in 1388 Sir John Cary was attainted by the Merciless Parliament, which resulted in his banishment to Ireland and the confiscation of his lands.

Royal household

householdImperial HouseholdBritish Royal Household
In 1391 he became an esquire in the household of King Richard II and in 1392 was also an esquire in the household of Richard's half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter, 1st Earl of Huntingdon (c.

Act of Parliament

ActActs of ParliamentActs
The Parliament of 1398 annulled the Acts of the Merciless Parliament of 1388, and thus Robert Cary recovered some of his father's forfeited estates.

Epiphany Rising

1399 revolutiona conspiracyconspiracy
Cary however resorted to physical violence against Chalons in an attempt to deny him possession of these estates, and in 1400 gave his support to the Epiphany Rising being planned by his patron John Holland, 1st Earl of Huntingdon, (now stripped of his dukedom) intended to effect the assassinate King Henry and his sons, and to return Richard, then in prison, to the throne.

Pontefract Castle

PontefractCastlecastle of Pomfret
The revolt failed and in 1400 Holland was executed and Richard died in Pontefract Castle.

Richard Courtenay

It appears that his return to royal favour was due to his first marriage in about 1402 and the influence of his brother-in-law Richard Courtenay (died 1415), Bishop of Norwich, a close friend and ally of the new king's son Henry of Monmouth, later King Henry V (1413–1422).

Bishop of Norwich

Bishop of ElmhamNorwichElmham
It appears that his return to royal favour was due to his first marriage in about 1402 and the influence of his brother-in-law Richard Courtenay (died 1415), Bishop of Norwich, a close friend and ally of the new king's son Henry of Monmouth, later King Henry V (1413–1422).

Henry V of England

Henry VKing Henry VHenry of Monmouth
It appears that his return to royal favour was due to his first marriage in about 1402 and the influence of his brother-in-law Richard Courtenay (died 1415), Bishop of Norwich, a close friend and ally of the new king's son Henry of Monmouth, later King Henry V (1413–1422).

Knight-errant

knight errantknights errantwhite knight
On the accession of King Henry V in 1413, Cary returned fully to royal favour, it is said by tradition not only due to the influence of Richard Courtenay, but also due to his triumph in a feat of arms against a knight errant of Aragon which much impressed the new king.

Aragon

AragónAragoneseAutonomous Community of Aragon
On the accession of King Henry V in 1413, Cary returned fully to royal favour, it is said by tradition not only due to the influence of Richard Courtenay, but also due to his triumph in a feat of arms against a knight errant of Aragon which much impressed the new king.