Robert Catlyn

Sir Robert CatlinSir Robert CatlynRobert Catlin
Sir Robert Catlyn (died 1574) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the Queen’s Bench.wikipedia
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Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales

Lord Chief JusticeChief Justice of the King's BenchLord Chief Justice of England
Sir Robert Catlyn (died 1574) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the Queen’s Bench. While Catlyn was chief justice, only two are mentioned in the "State Trials" and the "Baga de Secretis" adds very few more.

Mary Catlin

Mary
By her he left an only daughter, Mary, who married first Sir John Spencer, and secondly Sir Robert Fowler.
Mary Catlin was the daughter of Sir Robert Catlyn.

Robert Spencer, 1st Baron Spencer of Wormleighton

RobertSir Robert SpencerRobert Spencer
Her son by Sir John Spencer was Robert, who was created Baron Spencer of Wormleighton in 1603, and whose grandson Henry was advanced to the earldom of Sunderland in 1643.
He was born in Althorp, Northamptonshire, the son of John Spencer and Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Catlyn.

John Spencer (died 1600)

John SpencerSir John SpencerJohn
By her he left an only daughter, Mary, who married first Sir John Spencer, and secondly Sir Robert Fowler.
Spencer married Mary Catlyn, the only daughter and heiress of Sir Robert Catlin, who brought him estates in both Leicestershire and Northamptonshire.

Richard Catlyn

Richard Catlin
He should not be confused with his cousin Richard Catlyn, a politician, who died in 1556.

Raunds

Raunds, Northamptonshire
The branch of the Catlyn family from which Robert Catlyn was descended was anciently seated at Raunds in Northamptonshire.

Northamptonshire

NorthantsCounty of NorthamptonNorthamptonshire, England
The branch of the Catlyn family from which Robert Catlyn was descended was anciently seated at Raunds in Northamptonshire.

Hargrave, Northamptonshire

Hargrave
The Northamptonshire Visitation of 1564 shows that he was the son of Thomas Catlyn of Leicestershire, who was the second son of Thomas Catlyn of Raunds and his wife, an heiress of the Barton family of Hargrave.

Thrapston

He was born at Thrapston in Northamptonshire, and became a member of the Middle Temple, where he was elected reader in autumn, 1547.

Middle Temple

Middle Temple HallHonourable Society of the Middle TempleThe Honourable Society of the Middle Temple
He was born at Thrapston in Northamptonshire, and became a member of the Middle Temple, where he was elected reader in autumn, 1547.

Philip II of Spain

Philip IIKing Philip IIPhilip
In October, 1555, he was admitted with six others to the degree of the coif; and on 4 November, in the following year, Philip and Mary appointed him one of their Serjeants.

Mary I of England

Mary IQueen MaryMary
In October, 1555, he was admitted with six others to the degree of the coif; and on 4 November, in the following year, Philip and Mary appointed him one of their Serjeants. Catlyn was raised to the bench as a judge of the Common Pleas on 10 October 1558, five weeks before the death of Queen Mary; and, like all the other judges, received a new patent the day after the accession of Queen Elizabeth.

Serjeant-at-law

SLKing's SerjeantKS
In October, 1555, he was admitted with six others to the degree of the coif; and on 4 November, in the following year, Philip and Mary appointed him one of their Serjeants.

Court of Common Pleas (England)

Court of Common PleasCommon PleasCommon Bench
Catlyn was raised to the bench as a judge of the Common Pleas on 10 October 1558, five weeks before the death of Queen Mary; and, like all the other judges, received a new patent the day after the accession of Queen Elizabeth.

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth
Catlyn was raised to the bench as a judge of the Common Pleas on 10 October 1558, five weeks before the death of Queen Mary; and, like all the other judges, received a new patent the day after the accession of Queen Elizabeth.

Queen's Bench

King's BenchQueen's Bench DivisionCourt of King's Bench
Previous to the following term, on the removal of the two Catholic chief justices, Catlyn was, on 22 January, promoted to the head of the court of King's Bench, in the place of Sir Edward Saunders.

Edward Saunders (judge)

Sir Edward SaundersEdward Saunders
Previous to the following term, on the removal of the two Catholic chief justices, Catlyn was, on 22 January, promoted to the head of the court of King's Bench, in the place of Sir Edward Saunders.

William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley

William CecilLord BurghleySir William Cecil
That he was bold and independent also is apparent from a letter to Lord Burleigh, who had conveyed a message from the queen, complaining of his judgment in a suit in which the Earl of Leicester was a party, wherein he says he "dares not alter the ancient forms of court."

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester

Earl of LeicesterRobert Dudley, Earl of LeicesterRobert Dudley
That he was bold and independent also is apparent from a letter to Lord Burleigh, who had conveyed a message from the queen, complaining of his judgment in a suit in which the Earl of Leicester was a party, wherein he says he "dares not alter the ancient forms of court."

State trials

State Tr. N.S.State Trials, New SeriesState Trials: Political and Social
While Catlyn was chief justice, only two are mentioned in the "State Trials" and the "Baga de Secretis" adds very few more.

Baga de Secretis

While Catlyn was chief justice, only two are mentioned in the "State Trials" and the "Baga de Secretis" adds very few more.

Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk

Duke of NorfolkThomas Howard4th Duke of Norfolk
The principal one was that of the Duke of Norfolk, in January, 1571, at which all the judges attended.

The House of Fame

House of FameThe Hous of FameFame
On pronouncing judgment against Robert Hickford, one of the duke's servants, who pleaded guilty, Chief Justice Catlyn made him a long and eloquent speech on the heinousness of treason, thus happily referring to a passage in Chaucer's House of Fame — "As for them that seek fame by Treason, and by procuring the destruction of Princes, where shall sound that fame? Shall the golden Trump of Fame and Good Report, that Chaucer speaketh of? No; but the black Trump of Shame shall blow out their infamy for ever."

Geoffrey Chaucer

ChaucerChaucerianChaucer, Geoffrey
On pronouncing judgment against Robert Hickford, one of the duke's servants, who pleaded guilty, Chief Justice Catlyn made him a long and eloquent speech on the heinousness of treason, thus happily referring to a passage in Chaucer's House of Fame — "As for them that seek fame by Treason, and by procuring the destruction of Princes, where shall sound that fame? Shall the golden Trump of Fame and Good Report, that Chaucer speaketh of? No; but the black Trump of Shame shall blow out their infamy for ever."

William Camden

CamdenBritanniaCamden's ''Britannia
Camden relates that on one occasion the chief justice, having taken exception to a man who had two names, saying "no honest man had a double name, and came in with an alias," was somewhat inapplicably asked, "what exception he could take to Jesus Christ, alias Jesus of Nazareth?"