Robert E. Sherwood

Robert SherwoodAbsolutionRobert E. Sherwood AwardSherwood, Robert E.Small War on Murray HillTovarich
[[File:There shall be no night.JPG|thumb|Cover of Sherwood's play There Shall Be No Night.wikipedia
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Life (magazine)

LifeLife'' magazineLife Magazine
After his return to the United States, he began working as a movie critic for such magazines as Life and Vanity Fair.
In 1920, Gibson selected former Vanity Fair staffer Robert E. Sherwood as editor.

Richard Schickel

Schickel, RichardSchikel, RichardRichard Warren Schickel
In that film Time critic Richard Schickel discusses, among other topics, how Sherwood was the first New York critic invited to Hollywood by cross-country train to meet the stars and directors.
In this documentary film he discusses early film critics Frank E. Woods, Robert E. Sherwood, and Otis Ferguson, and tells of how, in the 1960s, he, Pauline Kael, and Andrew Sarris, rejected the moralizing opposition of the older Bosley Crowther of The New York Times who had railed against violent movies such as Bonnie and Clyde (1967).

Dorothy Parker

Parker
He was close friends with Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley, who were on the staff of Vanity Fair with Sherwood when the Round Table began meeting in 1919.
At the magazine, she met Robert Benchley, who became a close friend, and Robert E. Sherwood.

Algonquin Round Table

No Sirree!celebrated group
Sherwood was one of the original members of the Algonquin Round Table.
Robert E. Sherwood, author and playwright

Rosina Emmet Sherwood

RosinaRosina Emmet
Born in 1896 in New Rochelle, New York, Robert was a son of Arthur Murray Sherwood, a rich stockbroker, and his wife, the former Rosina Emmet, a highly accomplished illustrator and portrait painter known as Rosina E. Sherwood.
Rosina married, in 1887, Arthur Sherwood, having five children with him, including future Pulitzer Prize winner Robert E. Sherwood.

Idiot's Delight (play)

Idiot's DelightIdiot's Delight'' (play)Idiot’s Delight
Many of his later dramatic works employed variations of that motif, including Idiot's Delight (1936), which won Sherwood the first of four Pulitzer Prizes.
Idiot's Delight is a 1936 play written by American playwright Robert E. Sherwood.

Jane Emmet de Glehn

Jane Erin Emmet
His relatives also included three other notable American portrait artists: his aunts, Lydia Field Emmet and Jane Emmet de Glehn, and his first cousin, once removed, Ellen Emmet Rand.
She is also the aunt of the prominent American playwright Robert Emmet Sherwood.

Robert Emmet

1803EmmetRobert
He was a great-great-grandson of the former New York State Attorney General Thomas Addis Emmet and a great-grandnephew of the Irish nationalist Robert Emmet, who was executed for high treason after leading the Irish rebellion of 1803, one of a series of attempts to dislodge British rule in Ireland, in 1803.
Another descendant is American playwright Robert Emmet Sherwood.

The Road to Rome

Sherwood's first Broadway play, The Road to Rome (1927), a comedy concerning Hannibal's botched invasion of Rome, introduced one of his favorite themes: the futility of war.
The Road to Rome is a play by American author Robert Sherwood.

Robert Benchley

BenchleyRobert BenchlyRobert C. Benchley
He was close friends with Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley, who were on the staff of Vanity Fair with Sherwood when the Round Table began meeting in 1919.
Benchley began at Vanity Fair with fellow Harvard Lampoon and Hasty Pudding Theatricals alumnus Robert Emmet Sherwood and future friend and collaborator Dorothy Parker, who had taken over theatre criticism from P. G. Wodehouse years earlier.

Rebecca (1940 film)

Rebeccafilm adaptation1940 film
He also collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock and Joan Harrison in writing the screenplay for Rebecca (1940).
The screenplay by Robert E. Sherwood and Joan Harrison, and adaptation by Philip MacDonald and Michael Hogan, were based on the 1938 novel of the same name by Daphne du Maurier.

Pulitzer Prize

PulitzerPulitzer-PrizePulitzer Prizes
Many of his later dramatic works employed variations of that motif, including Idiot's Delight (1936), which won Sherwood the first of four Pulitzer Prizes.
Robert E. Sherwood, Drama (3) and Biography

There Shall Be No Night

His 1940 play about the Soviet Union's invasion of Finland, There Shall Be No Night, was produced by the Playwright's Company that he co-founded and starred Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, and Montgomery Clift.
There Shall Be No Night is a three-act play written by American playwright Robert E. Sherwood.

Lydia Field Emmet

Lydia Emmet
His relatives also included three other notable American portrait artists: his aunts, Lydia Field Emmet and Jane Emmet de Glehn, and his first cousin, once removed, Ellen Emmet Rand.
One of Emmet's most famous portraits is that of her young nephew, playwright Robert Emmet Sherwood.

Broadway theatre

BroadwayBroadway musicalBroadway shows
Sherwood's first Broadway play, The Road to Rome (1927), a comedy concerning Hannibal's botched invasion of Rome, introduced one of his favorite themes: the futility of war.
The 1920s also spawned a new age of American playwright with the emergence of Eugene O'Neill, whose plays Beyond the Horizon, Anna Christie, The Hairy Ape, Strange Interlude and Mourning Becomes Electra proved that there was an audience for serious drama on Broadway, and O'Neill's success paved the way for major dramatists like Elmer Rice, Maxwell Anderson, Robert E. Sherwood, Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller, as well as writers of comedy like George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart.

Thomas Addis Emmet

Dr. Thomas Addis EmmetThomasThomas Addis
He was a great-great-grandson of the former New York State Attorney General Thomas Addis Emmet and a great-grandnephew of the Irish nationalist Robert Emmet, who was executed for high treason after leading the Irish rebellion of 1803, one of a series of attempts to dislodge British rule in Ireland, in 1803.
He is the great-great-grandfather of the playwright Robert Emmet Sherwood.

Alfred Lunt

Lunt
His 1940 play about the Soviet Union's invasion of Finland, There Shall Be No Night, was produced by the Playwright's Company that he co-founded and starred Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, and Montgomery Clift.
The roles ranged from the Earl of Essex in Maxwell Anderson's Elizabeth the Queen, to a song-and-dance man touring the Balkans in Robert E. Sherwood's Idiot's Delight, a megalomaniacal tycoon in S. N. Behrman's Meteor and Jupiter himself in Jean Giraudoux's Amphitryon 38.

Lynn Fontanne

Lynn FontaineFontannehis wife
His 1940 play about the Soviet Union's invasion of Finland, There Shall Be No Night, was produced by the Playwright's Company that he co-founded and starred Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, and Montgomery Clift.
She soon became celebrated for her skill as an actress in high comedy, excelling in witty roles written for her by Noël Coward, S.N. Behrman, and Robert Sherwood.

Fay School

Sherwood was educated at Fay School, Milton Academy and then Harvard University.
Robert E. Sherwood (1909), Four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright

Bancroft Prize

1997 Bancroft PrizeBancroftBancroft Prize in American History
He recounted the experience in his book Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History, which won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography and a 1949 Bancroft Prize.

Montgomery Clift

CliftsMontgomery Clift’Monty Clift
His 1940 play about the Soviet Union's invasion of Finland, There Shall Be No Night, was produced by the Playwright's Company that he co-founded and starred Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontanne, and Montgomery Clift.
He appeared in plays written by Moss Hart, Robert Sherwood, Lillian Hellman, Tennessee Williams, and Thornton Wilder, creating the part of Henry in the original production of The Skin of Our Teeth.

Katharine Cornell

Katharine Cornell produced and starred in a 1957 TV adaptation on NBC.
She did appear in television adaptations of The Barretts of Wimpole Street and Robert E. Sherwood's There Shall Be No Night.

The Best Years of Our Lives

Best Years of Our Lives, The
After serving as Director of the Office of War Information from 1943 until the conclusion of the war, he returned to dramatic writing with the movie The Best Years of Our Lives, directed by William Wyler.
Robert E. Sherwood then adapted the novella as a screenplay.

Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography

Biography or AutobiographyPulitzer PrizePulitzer Prize for Biography
He recounted the experience in his book Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History, which won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography and a 1949 Bancroft Prize.
1949: Roosevelt and Hopkins by Robert E. Sherwood

Waterloo Bridge (play)

Waterloo BridgeplayWaterloo Bridge'' (play)
Waterloo Bridge (1930) - adapted into two American films and two Brazilian soap-operas
Waterloo Bridge: A play in two acts is a 1930 play by Robert E. Sherwood.