Robert Morris (financier)

Robert MorrisMorrisMr. MorrisR[obert] MorrisRobert Morris the youngerRobert Morris, Jr.
Robert Morris, Jr. (January 20, 1734 – May 8, 1806) was an English-born merchant and a Founding Father of the United States.wikipedia
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Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
Robert Morris, Jr. (January 20, 1734 – May 8, 1806) was an English-born merchant and a Founding Father of the United States.
New arrivals included Benjamin Franklin and Robert Morris of Pennsylvania, John Hancock of Massachusetts, and John Witherspoon of New Jersey.

Bank of North America

De Facto Central Bank, Chartered by the Congress of the Confederation
Morris also reformed government contracting and established the Bank of North America, the first bank to operate in the United States.
It was based upon a plan presented by US Superintendent of Finance Robert Morris on May 17, 1781 that created the Nation's first de facto central bank.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceindependenceAmerican Declaration of Independence
He served as a member of the Pennsylvania legislature, the Second Continental Congress, and the United States Senate, and he was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution.
In the Pennsylvania delegation, Dickinson and Robert Morris abstained, allowing the delegation to vote three-to-two in favor of independence.

Superintendent of Finance of the United States

Superintendent of FinanceFinanceFinance Office
From 1781 to 1784, he served as the Superintendent of Finance of the United States, becoming known as the "Financier of the Revolution."
The only person to hold the office was Robert Morris, who served from 1781 to 1784, with the assistance of Gouverneur Morris.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
Along with Alexander Hamilton and Albert Gallatin, he is widely regarded as one of the founders of the financial system of the United States.
Several Congressmen, including Hamilton, Robert Morris and Gouverneur Morris (no relation), attempted to use this Newburgh Conspiracy as leverage to secure support from the states and in Congress for funding of the national government.

Albert Gallatin

GallatinistGallatinA. A. Albert Gallatin
Along with Alexander Hamilton and Albert Gallatin, he is widely regarded as one of the founders of the financial system of the United States.
With most of his business ventures unsuccessful, Gallatin sold much of his land, excluding Friendship Hill, to Robert Morris; he and his wife would instead live in Philadelphia and other coastal cities for most of the rest of their lives.

Oxford, Maryland

Oxford
In 1747, Morris immigrated to Oxford, Maryland, where his father had prospered in the tobacco trade.
Early inhabitants included Robert Morris, Sr., agent for a Liverpool shipping firm who greatly influenced the town's growth; his son, Robert Morris, Jr., known as "the financier of the Revolution;" Jeremiah Banning, sea captain, war hero, and statesman; The Reverend Thomas Bacon, Anglican clergyman who wrote the first compilation of the laws of Maryland; Matthew Tilghman, known as the "patriarch of Maryland" and "father of statehood"; and Colonel Tench Tilghman, aide-de-camp to George Washington and the man who carried the message of General Cornwallis's surrender to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

Morrisville, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

Morrisville, PennsylvaniaMorrisvilleMorrisville, PA
He later purchased another rural manor, which he named Morrisville, that was located across the Delaware River from Trenton, New Jersey.
The settlement incorporated into a borough in 1804, taking the name of Morrisville, after Founding Father Robert Morris.

Thomas Willing

WillingThomas Willing Francis
He also befriended Thomas Willing, the oldest son of Charles Willing who was two years older than Morris and who, like Morris, had split his life between England and British North America.
In 1749, after studying abroad in England, he returned to Philadelphia, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits, in partnership with Robert Morris, until 1793.

Market Street (Philadelphia)

Market StreetMarket StreetsMarket East
In 1781, Morris purchased a home on Market Street that was two blocks north of Independence Hall, then the seat of the Second Continental Congress.
The mansion of Robert Morris, financier of the American Revolution, was located near Sixth and Market Streets.

Debtors' prison

debtor's prisondebtors prisonimprisonment for debt
Unable to pay his creditors, he was confined in debtors' prison from 1798 to 1801.
Fellow signatory Robert Morris spent three years, from 1798 to 1801, in the Prune Street Debtors' Prison, Philadelphia Henry Lee III, better known as Henry "Light-Horse" Lee, a Revolutionary War general and father of Robert E. Lee, was imprisoned for debt between 1808 and 1809 where he made use of his time by writing "Memoirs of the War".

White House

The White HousePresident's HouseExecutive Mansion
The President's House, as it became known, would serve as the residence of the president until 1800, when President John Adams moved to the White House in Washington, D.C.
The City of Philadelphia rented Robert Morris's city house at 190 High Street (now 524–30 Market Street) for Washington's presidential residence.

Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776

1776 ConstitutionPennsylvania ConstitutionConstitution of 1776
Out of office, Morris refocused on his merchant career and won election to the Pennsylvania Assembly, where he became a leader of the "Republican" faction that sought alterations to the Pennsylvania Constitution.
The change of government, however, was opposed by many of the citizens - John Dickinson, James Wilson, Robert Morris, and Frederick Muhlenberg, among others.

President's House (Philadelphia)

President's HousePresident's House in Philadelphiaexecutive mansion
The President's House, as it became known, would serve as the residence of the president until 1800, when President John Adams moved to the White House in Washington, D.C.
Under his care the house suffered a fire, and was sold to a man whom Holker knew well, financier Robert Morris.

Christ Church, Philadelphia

Christ ChurchChrist Church Burial GroundChrist Church North Garden
The Morrises worshiped at the Anglican Christ Church, which was also attended by Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Willing, and other leading citizens of Philadelphia.
American Revolutionary War leaders who attended Christ Church include George Washington, Robert Morris, Benjamin Franklin and Betsy Ross (after she had been read out of the Quaker meeting house to which she belonged for marrying John Ross, son of an assistant rector at Christ Church).

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia Convention1787 Constitutional Convention
In 1787, Morris was selected as a delegate to the Philadelphia Convention, which wrote and proposed a new constitution for the United States.
Just two delegates, Roger Sherman and Robert Morris, would be signatories to all three of the nation's founding documents: the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution.

Empress of China (1783)

Empress of ChinaEmpress of China'' (1783)
In 1784, Morris, with other investors, underwrote the voyage of the ship Empress of China, the first American vessel to visit the Chinese mainland.
The ship's captain John Green (1736–1796) was a former U.S. naval officer, its two business agents (supercargos), Samuel Shaw (1754–1794) and Thomas Randall (1723–1797), were former officers in the U.S. Continental Army, and its syndicate of owners, including Robert Morris (1734–1806) were some of the richest men in the new nation.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionArticles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.Confederation
He served as a member of the Pennsylvania legislature, the Second Continental Congress, and the United States Senate, and he was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution.
Robert Morris

Charles Willing

Greenway arranged for Morris to become an apprentice at the shipping and banking firm of Philadelphia merchant Charles Willing.
Robert Morris apprenticed at the firm of Willing & Co., and later became a partner with Thomas in the renamed firm of Willing Morris & Co.

Independence Hall

Pennsylvania State HouseState HouseIndependence Square
In 1781, Morris purchased a home on Market Street that was two blocks north of Independence Hall, then the seat of the Second Continental Congress.
However, a representative from Pennsylvania, Robert Morris, did manage to convince Congress to return to Philadelphia while the new permanent capital was being built.

Thomas Paine

Tom PainePainePaine, Thomas
After Morris left Congress, Laurens, Thomas Paine, and some other members of Congress continued to attack him for allegedly using his position in Congress for his own financial benefit, but in early 1779 a congressional committee cleared Morris of all charges.
There was scandal; together with Paine's conflict with Robert Morris and Silas Deane it led to Paine's expulsion from the Committee in 1779.

Committee of Secret Correspondence

In addition to his service on the Secret Committee of Trade, Morris was also appointed to the Marine Committee, which oversaw the Continental Navy, and the Committee of Secret Correspondence, which oversaw efforts to establish relations with foreign powers.
The original members of the Committee of Secret Correspondence were Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Harrison V, Thomas Johnson, John Jay, Robert Morris, and John Dickinson.

William Maclay (Pennsylvania senator)

William Maclay
In September 1788, the Pennsylvania legislature elected Robert Morris and William Maclay, both of whom were aligned with the Federalists, as the state's first representatives in the United States Senate.
Maclay, along with Robert Morris, was a member of Pennsylvania's first two-member delegation to the United States Senate.

Lee Resolution

resolution of independenceresolutiona resolution
With Morris absent, all congressional delegations voted to pass a resolution declaring independence on July 2, and the United States formally declared independence on July 4, 1776.
The following day, another committee of five (John Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Benjamin Harrison V, and Robert Morris) was established to prepare a plan of treaties to be proposed to foreign powers; a third committee was created, consisting of one member from each colony, to prepare a draft of a constitution for confederation of the states.

William White (bishop of Pennsylvania)

William WhiteBishop WhiteBishop William White
Mary's brother, William White, was ordained as an Episcopal priest and served as the Senate chaplain.
White's younger sister Mary was married to Robert Morris, who was known as the "Financier of the Revolution" for securing funding for the colonial cause.