Robert N. Bellah

Robert Bellah,
Robert Neelly Bellah (1927–2013) was an American sociologist and the Elliott Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.wikipedia
97 Related Articles

Sociology of religion

sociologist of religionsociologists of religionreligion
He was internationally known for his work related to the sociology of religion.
Thus later sociologists of religion (notably Robert Neelly Bellah) have extended Durkheimian insights to talk about notions of civil religion, or the religion of a state.

Talcott Parsons

ParsonsParsonianParsons, Talcot
Bellah graduated from Harvard in a joint sociology and Far East languages program, with Talcott Parsons and John Pelzel as his advisors, respectively. Bellah first encountered the work of Talcott Parsons as an undergraduate when his senior honors thesis advisor was David Aberle, a former student of Parsons.
Some of the students who arrived at the Department of Social Relations in the years after the Second World War were David Aberle, Gardner Lindzey, Harold Garfinkel, David G. Hays, Benton Johnson, Marian Johnson, Kaspar Naegele, James Olds, Albert Cohen, Norman Birnbaum, Robin Murphy Williams, Jackson Toby, Robert N. Bellah, Joseph Kahl, Joseph Berger, Morris Zelditch, Renee Fox, Tom O'Dea, Ezra Vogel, Clifford Geertz, Joseph Elder, Theodore Mills, Mark Field, Edward Laumann, and Francis Sutton.

American civil religion

civil religion
Bellah was perhaps best known for his work related to American civil religion, a term which he coined in a 1967 article that has since gained widespread attention among scholars.
The concept goes back to the 19th century, but in current form, the theory was developed by sociologist Robert Bellah in 1967 in his article, "Civil Religion in America".

Civil religion

civic religioncivil ceremony
Civil religion
As a concept, it originated in French political thought and became a major topic for U.S. sociologists since its use by Robert Bellah in 1960.

Altus, Oklahoma

AltusAltus (OK)Altus Bulldogs
Bellah was born in Altus, Oklahoma, on February 23, 1927.
Robert N. Bellah, sociologist of religion

Sheilaism

Sheilaism
The term derives from a woman named Sheila Larson, who is quoted by Robert N. Bellah et al. in their book Habits of the Heart as following her own "little voice" in a faith she calls "Sheilaism".

Lifestyle enclave

lifestyle
Lifestyle enclave
Lifestyle enclave is a sociological term first used by Robert N. Bellah et al. in their 1985 book, Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life.

Communitarianism

communitariancommunitarianscommunautarisme
His views are often classified as communitarian.
Among those who raised these issues were Robert Nisbet (Twilight of Authority), Robert N. Bellah (Habits of the Heart), and Alan Ehrenhalt (The Lost City: The Forgotten Virtues Of Community In America).

Secular religion

political religionquasi-religionquasi-religious
Political religion
Totalitarian societies are perhaps more prone to political religion, but various scholars have described features of political religion even in democracies, for instance American civil religion as described by Robert Bellah in 1967.

Jeffrey C. Alexander

Alexander
Later he worked with Neil Smelser, Robert N. Bellah, and Leo Lowenthal.

National Humanities Medal

Charles Frankel PrizeFrankel MedalHumanities
He received the National Humanities Medal in 2000 from President Bill Clinton, in part for "his efforts to illuminate the importance of community in American society."
Robert N. Bellah

Sociology

sociologistsociologicalsociologists
Robert Neelly Bellah (1927–2013) was an American sociologist and the Elliott Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Latin honors

magna cum laudesumma cum laudecum laude
Bellah graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1950, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in social relations with a concentration in social anthropology.

Harvard College

HarvardHarvard Universityhouses
Bellah graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1950, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in social relations with a concentration in social anthropology.

Bachelor of Arts

B.A.BAA.B.
Bellah graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1950, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in social relations with a concentration in social anthropology.

Social anthropology

social anthropologistsocialsocial anthropologists
Bellah graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1950, receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in social relations with a concentration in social anthropology.

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeHarvard University’s
Bellah graduated from Harvard in a joint sociology and Far East languages program, with Talcott Parsons and John Pelzel as his advisors, respectively.

David Aberle

Bellah first encountered the work of Talcott Parsons as an undergraduate when his senior honors thesis advisor was David Aberle, a former student of Parsons.

Doctor of Philosophy

Ph.D.PhDPh.D
He received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1955.

Protestant work ethic

Protestant ethicwork hardan emphasis on personal behavior
His doctoral dissertation was titled Religion and Society in Tokugawa Japan and was an extension of Weber's Protestant ethic thesis to Japan.

John Reed Clubs

John Reed ClubJohn Reed Club of New YorkJohn Reed Clubs of the United States
While an undergraduate at Harvard, Bellah was a member of the Communist Party USA from 1947 to 1949 and a chairman of the John Reed Club, "a recognized student organization concerned with the study of Marxism".

Marxism

MarxistMarxistsMarxist theory
While an undergraduate at Harvard, Bellah was a member of the Communist Party USA from 1947 to 1949 and a chairman of the John Reed Club, "a recognized student organization concerned with the study of Marxism".

McGeorge Bundy

Bundy, McGeorgeMac Bundy
During the summer of 1954, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard McGeorge Bundy, who later served as a national security adviser to John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, threatened to withdraw Bellah's graduate student fellowship if he did not provide the names of his former club associates.

John F. Kennedy

KennedyPresident KennedyJFK
During the summer of 1954, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard McGeorge Bundy, who later served as a national security adviser to John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, threatened to withdraw Bellah's graduate student fellowship if he did not provide the names of his former club associates.

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon JohnsonJohnsonPresident Johnson
During the summer of 1954, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard McGeorge Bundy, who later served as a national security adviser to John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, threatened to withdraw Bellah's graduate student fellowship if he did not provide the names of his former club associates.