Robert Noyce

Robert N. NoyceBob NoyceNoyce, RobertNoyce FoundationRobert H. Noyce
Robert Norton Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed "the Mayor of Silicon Valley," was an American physicist who co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel Corporation in 1968.wikipedia
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Fairchild Semiconductor

FairchildFairchild Semiconductor CorporationFairchild Camera & Instrument Corporation, Semiconductor Division
Robert Norton Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed "the Mayor of Silicon Valley," was an American physicist who co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel Corporation in 1968. Noyce left a year later with the "traitorous eight" upon having issues with Shockley's management style, and co-founded the influential Fairchild Semiconductor corporation.
The eight men were Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, and Sheldon Roberts.

Grinnell College

Iowa CollegeGrinnellGrinell College
While in high school, he exhibited a talent for mathematics and science and took the Grinnell College freshman physics course in his senior year.
Its alumni include actor Gary Cooper, chemist Thomas Cech, Intel co-founder Robert Noyce, jazz musician Herbie Hancock, government administrator Harry Hopkins, and comedian Kumail Nanjiani.

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley, CaliforniaSan JoseSan Francisco Bay Area technology industry
He is also credited with the realization of the first monolithic integrated circuit or microchip, which fueled the personal computer revolution and gave Silicon Valley its name.
Two of the original employees of Fairchild Semiconductor, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore, would go on to found Intel.

Jack Kilby

Jack S. KilbyJack St. Clair KilbyJ. Kilby
After Jack Kilby invented the first hybrid integrated circuit (hybrid IC) in 1958, Noyce in 1959 independently invented a new type of integrated circuit, the monolithic integrated circuit (monolithic IC).
Jack St. Clair Kilby (November 8, 1923 – June 20, 2005) was an American electrical engineer who took part (along with Robert Noyce) in the realization of the first integrated circuit while working at Texas Instruments (TI) in 1958.

Traitorous eight

eight leading scientistsFairchildrenfounders of Fairchild
Noyce left a year later with the "traitorous eight" upon having issues with Shockley's management style, and co-founded the influential Fairchild Semiconductor corporation.
The eight who left Shockley Semiconductor were Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, and Sheldon Roberts.

Intel

Intel CorporationIntel Corp.Intel Inside
Robert Norton Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed "the Mayor of Silicon Valley," was an American physicist who co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel Corporation in 1968. Noyce and Gordon Moore founded Intel in 1968 when they left Fairchild Semiconductor.
Intel Corporation was founded on July 18, 1968, by semiconductor pioneers Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore (of Moore's law), and is associated with the executive leadership and vision of Andrew Grove.

Grant O. Gale

Grant Gale
Grant Gale, Noyce's physics professor and president of the college, did not want to lose a student with Robert's potential.
One of Gale's most noted students was his former baby sitter, Robert Noyce, co-inventor of the integrated circuit and founder of Intel.

Silicon

Sisilicon revolutionsilicium
Noyce's design was made of silicon, whereas Kilby's chip was made of germanium.
In addition, Atalla's surface passivation process was the basis for two other important silicon semiconductor inventions at Fairchild Semiconductor, Swiss engineer Jean Hoerni's planar technology in 1958 and American physicist Robert Noyce's silicon integrated circuit chip in 1959.

Burlington, Iowa

BurlingtonBurlington, IABurlington,
Noyce was born on December 12, 1927, in Burlington, Iowa the third of four sons of the Rev. Ralph Brewster Noyce.

Planar process

planar technologyplanarmicrofabricated
The basis for Noyce's monolithic IC was the planar process, developed in early 1959 by Jean Hoerni.
Hoerni's planar process was in turn the basis for Robert Noyce's invention of the monolithic integrated circuit chip at Fairchild, later in 1959.

Elizabeth Noyce

Elizabeth B NoyceElizabeth B. NoyceElizabeth Bottomley
In 1953, Noyce married Elizabeth Bottomley, who was a 1951 graduate of Tufts University.
In the early 1950s, Robert Noyce was working on his doctorate at MIT, in Cambridge near Boston.

Gordon Moore

Gordon E. MooreGordonGordon and Betty Moore
Noyce and Gordon Moore founded Intel in 1968 when they left Fairchild Semiconductor.
In July 1968, Robert Noyce and Moore founded NM Electronics, which later became Intel Corporation.

Integrated circuit

integrated circuitsmicrochipchip
He is also credited with the realization of the first monolithic integrated circuit or microchip, which fueled the personal computer revolution and gave Silicon Valley its name. After Jack Kilby invented the first hybrid integrated circuit (hybrid IC) in 1958, Noyce in 1959 independently invented a new type of integrated circuit, the monolithic integrated circuit (monolithic IC).
Atalla's surface passivation process isolated individual diodes and transistors, which was extended to independent transistors on a single piece of silicon by Kurt Lehovec at Sprague Electric in 1959, and then independently by Robert Noyce at Fairchild later the same year.

Andrew Grove

Andy GroveAndrew S. GroveAndrás István Gróf
Arthur Rock, the chairman of Intel's board and a major investor in the company, said that for Intel to succeed, the company needed Noyce, Moore and Andrew Grove.
In 1968, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore co-founded Intel, after they and Grove left Fairchild Semiconductor.

Jean Hoerni

Jean A. Hoerni
The basis for Noyce's monolithic IC was the planar process, developed in early 1959 by Jean Hoerni.
But Shockley's strange behavior compelled the so-called "traitorous eight": Hoerni, Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce and Sheldon Roberts, to leave his laboratory and create the Fairchild Semiconductor corporation.

Passivation (chemistry)

passivationsurface passivationpassivating
In turn, the basis for Hoerni's planar process were the silicon surface passivation and thermal oxidation methods developed by Mohamed Atalla in 1957.
Atalla's surface passivation method was the basis for several important inventions in 1959: the MOSFET (MOS transistor) by Atalla and Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs, the planar process by Jean Hoerni at Fairchild Semiconductor, and the monolithic integrated circuit chip by Robert Noyce at Fairchild in 1959.

National Medal of Technology and Innovation

National Medal of TechnologyNational Medals of TechnologyNational Medals of Technology and Innovation
President Ronald Reagan awarded him the National Medal of Technology in 1987.

Mohamed M. Atalla

Mohamed AtallaMartin Mohamed AtallaMohamed Mohamed Atalla
In turn, the basis for Hoerni's planar process were the silicon surface passivation and thermal oxidation methods developed by Mohamed Atalla in 1957.
Atalla's silicon transistor passivation technique by thermal oxide was the basis for several important inventions in 1959: the MOSFET (MOS transistor) by Atalla and Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs, the planar process by Jean Hoerni at Fairchild Semiconductor, and the monolithic integrated circuit chip by Robert Noyce at Fairchild in 1959.

Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory

Shockley SemiconductorShockleyShockley Transistor Corporation
He left in 1956 to join William Shockley, a co-inventor of the transistor and eventual Nobel Prize winner, at the Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory in Mountain View, California.
Eventually a group of the youngest employees — Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, and Sheldon Roberts — went over Shockley's head to Arnold Beckman, demanding that Shockley be replaced.

Charles Stark Draper Prize

Draper PrizeCharles Stark Draper Prize for EngineeringNAE Charles Stark Draper Prize
The National Academy of Engineering awarded him its 1989 Charles Stark Draper Prize.

Stuart Ballantine Medal

Noyce received the Franklin Institute's Stuart Ballantine Medal in 1966.

Bremen, Maine

Bremen
Elizabeth loved New England, so the family acquired a 50-acre coastal summer home in Bremen, Maine.

John Fritz Medal

John Fritz Gold MedalFritz MedalJohn Fritz Medal Board of Award

National Academy of Engineering

United States National Academy of EngineeringU.S. National Academy of EngineeringNAE
The National Academy of Engineering awarded him its 1989 Charles Stark Draper Prize.
NAE's list ranked electronics based upon two inventions, the transistor and integrated circuits, even it neglected to mention their physicist inventors, John Bardeen, Walter H. Brattain, William B. Shockley, Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce.