Robert R. Livingston (chancellor)

Robert R. LivingstonRobert LivingstonChancellor LivingstonChancellor Robert LivingstonChancellor" Livingstonco-authorJudge Robert R. LivingstonLivingstonMinister LivingstonRobert L. Livingston
Robert Robert Livingston (November 27, 1746 (Old Style November 16) – February 26, 1813) was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat from New York, and a Founding Father of the United States.wikipedia
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Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
Robert Robert Livingston (November 27, 1746 (Old Style November 16) – February 26, 1813) was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat from New York, and a Founding Father of the United States.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
He was a member of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence, along with Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Roger Sherman.
On June 11, 1776, Congress appointed a "Committee of Five" to draft a declaration, consisting of John Adams of Massachusetts, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania, Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, Robert R. Livingston of New York, and Roger Sherman of Connecticut.

Edward Livingston

Livingston CodeEdward
Among his siblings was his younger brother, Edward Livingston (1764-1836), who also served as U.S. Minister to France, his sister Gertrude Livingston (1757–1833), who married Gov. Morgan Lewis (1754–1844), sister Janet Livingston (d.
Among his many siblings were Chancellor of New York Robert R. Livingston; Janet Livingston, who married Gen. Richard Montgomery; Margaret Livingston, who married New York Secretary of State Thomas Tillotson; Henry Beekman Livingston; Catharine Livingston, who married Freeborn Garrettson; merchant John R. Livingston; Gertrude Livingston, who married Gov. Morgan Lewis; Joanna Livingston, who married Peter R. Livingston, acting Lieutenant Governor of New York; and Alida Livingston, who married John Armstrong, Jr., a U.S. Senator, U.S. Secretary of War, and U.S. Minister to France who was the son of Gen. John Armstrong, Sr.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
He was a member of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence, along with Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Roger Sherman.
He chose himself, Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman.

Committee of Five

committeefive-man committeefive-man drafting committee
He was a member of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence, along with Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Roger Sherman.
On June 11, the Committee of Five was appointed: John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Robert Livingston of New York, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania, and Thomas Jefferson of Virginia.

Clermont State Historic Site

ClermontClermont ManorClermont Estate
He had nine brothers and sisters, all of whom wed and made their homes on the Hudson River near the family seat at Clermont Manor. During his time as U.S. minister to France, Livingston met Robert Fulton, with whom he developed the first viable steamboat, the North River Steamboat, whose home port was at the Livingston family home of Clermont Manor in the town of Clermont, New York.
Their son, Robert R. Livingston, later known as "Chancellor", served on the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
He was a member of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence, along with Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Roger Sherman.
In 1802, he instructed James Monroe and Robert R. Livingston to negotiate with Napoleon to purchase New Orleans and adjacent coastal areas from France.

Columbia College (New York)

Columbia CollegeColumbia College of Columbia UniversityColumbia College, Columbia University
King's College was renamed Columbia College of Columbia University following the American Revolution in 1784.
Even at this young age, King's College had already educated Alexander Hamilton, who served as military aide to General George Washington, initiated and authored most of The Federalist Papers, and then as the first Secretary of the Treasury; John Jay, author of several of the Federalist Papers and the first Chief Justice of the United States; Robert Livingston, one of the Committee of Five who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and Gouverneur Morris, who authored most of the United States Constitution.

Oath of office of the President of the United States

oath of officepresidential oath of officepresidential oath
Livingston administered the presidential oath of office to George Washington at his first inauguration on April 30, 1789, at Federal Hall in New York City, which was then the nation's capital.
George Washington was sworn into office during his first inauguration, on April 30, 1789, by Chancellor of New York Robert Livingston.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Livingston administered the presidential oath of office to George Washington at his first inauguration on April 30, 1789, at Federal Hall in New York City, which was then the nation's capital. Livingston administered the Oath of Office to George Washington when he assumed the presidency in 1789.
Chancellor Robert R. Livingston administered the oath, using a Bible provided by the Masons, after which the militia fired a 13-gun salute.

United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs

Secretary of Foreign AffairsU.S. Secretary of Foreign AffairsForeign Affairs
Concurrently, he served from 1781 to 1783 as the first United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs under the Articles of Confederation.
On August 10, 1781, Congress selected Robert R. Livingston, a delegate from New York, as the first Secretary for Foreign Affairs.

Presidency of George Washington

first inauguration of George WashingtonWashington administrationinaugurated
Livingston administered the presidential oath of office to George Washington at his first inauguration on April 30, 1789, at Federal Hall in New York City, which was then the nation's capital.
As judges of the federal courts had not yet been appointed, the presidential oath of office was administered by Chancellor Robert Livingston, the highest judicial officer in the state of New York.

Recorder of New York City

Recorder14th Recorder of New York CityCity Recorder
In October 1773, Livingston was appointed Recorder of New York City, but soon thereafter identified himself with the anti-colonial Whig Party, and was replaced a few months later by John Watts, Jr.

Louisiana Purchase

LouisianaLouisiana TerritorySale of Louisiana
Serving from 1801 to 1804, Livingston negotiated the Louisiana Purchase.
Jefferson tasked James Monroe and Robert R. Livingston with purchasing New Orleans.

John Jay

Chief Justice John JayJayfirst Chief Justice of the United States
Livingston opposed the Jay Treaty and other initiatives of the Federalist party, founded and led by his former colleagues Alexander Hamilton and John Jay.
There he made many influential friends, including his closest, Robert Livingston, the son of a prominent New York aristocrat and Supreme Court justice.

North River Steamboat

ClermontNorth RiverClermont (steamboat)
During his time as U.S. minister to France, Livingston met Robert Fulton, with whom he developed the first viable steamboat, the North River Steamboat, whose home port was at the Livingston family home of Clermont Manor in the town of Clermont, New York.
She was built by the wealthy investor and politician Robert Livingston and inventor and entrepreneur Robert Fulton (1765–1815).

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
In 1789, Livingston joined the Jeffersonian Republicans (later known as the Democratic-Republicans), forming an uneasy alliance with his previous rival George Clinton and Aaron Burr, then a political newcomer.
In early 1803, Jefferson dispatched James Monroe to France to join ambassador Robert Livingston on a diplomatic mission to purchase New Orleans.

Morgan Lewis (governor)

Morgan LewisGertrude LivingstonGertrude (née Livingston) Lewis
Among his siblings was his younger brother, Edward Livingston (1764-1836), who also served as U.S. Minister to France, his sister Gertrude Livingston (1757–1833), who married Gov. Morgan Lewis (1754–1844), sister Janet Livingston (d.
In the summer of 1824, on his visit to the United States, the Marquis de Lafayette dined there on his way upriver to visit Lewis' brother-in-law, Chancellor Livingston.

Peter R. Livingston

Peter LivingstonPeter R.Peter Robert Livingston
1824), who married Richard Montgomery (1738–1775), sister Alida Livingston (1761–1822), who married John Armstrong, Jr. (1758–1843) (who succeeded him as U.S. Minister to France), and sister Joanna Livingston (1759–1827), who married Peter R. Livingston (1766–1847).
She was the sister of Chancellor Robert R. Livingston (1746–1813), a member of the Committee of Five that drafted the Declaration of Independence, and Edward Livingston (1764-1836), a U.S. Senator and the 11th U.S. Secretary of State.

Robert Fulton

Fulton(Robert) FultonAmerican engineer and inventor of the same name
During his time as U.S. minister to France, Livingston met Robert Fulton, with whom he developed the first viable steamboat, the North River Steamboat, whose home port was at the Livingston family home of Clermont Manor in the town of Clermont, New York.
In France, Fulton met Robert R. Livingston, who was appointed as U.S. Ambassador to France in 1801.

Erie Canal Commission

Canal CommissionerCanal CommissionersCanal Board
In 1811, Fulton and Livingston became members of the Erie Canal Commission.
The bill added Robert Fulton and Robert R. Livingston to the Commission.

Livingston County, New York

LivingstonLivingston CountyLivingston Co.
The county is named after Robert R. Livingston, who helped draft the Declaration of Independence and negotiated the Louisiana Purchase.

New York Court of Chancery

ChancellorChancellor of New YorkChancellor of the State of New York
On July 30, 1777, Livingston became the first Chancellor of New York, which was then the highest judicial officer in the state.

John Stevens (inventor, born 1749)

John StevensColonel John StevensJohn Stevens III
On September 9, 1770, Livingston married Mary Stevens (1751–1814), the daughter of Continental Congressman John Stevens and sister of inventor John Stevens III.
1814), married Robert R. Livingston, the first Chancellor of the State of New York.

Livingston County, Kentucky

LivingstonLivingston CountyLivingston (KY)
The county was established in 1798 from land taken from Christian County and is named for Robert R. Livingston, a member of the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence.