Roberts Court

Roberts
The Roberts Court is the time since 2005 during which the Supreme Court of the United States has been led by Chief Justice John Roberts.wikipedia
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Anthony Kennedy

Justice KennedyKennedyAnthony M. Kennedy
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer.
After the retirement of Sandra Day O'Connor in 2006, he was the swing vote on many of the Roberts Court's 5–4 decisions.

David Souter

Justice SouterSouterDavid H. Souter
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer.
Appointed by President George H. W. Bush to fill the seat vacated by William J. Brennan Jr., Souter sat on both the Rehnquist and Roberts Courts.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The Roberts Court is the time since 2005 during which the Supreme Court of the United States has been led by Chief Justice John Roberts.
The conservative bloc, joined by Kennedy, formed the majority in 63% of the 5–4 decisions, the highest cohesion rate of that bloc in the Roberts Court.

Citizens United v. FEC

Citizens United v. Federal Election CommissionCitizens UnitedCitizens United v FEC
Later rulings by the Roberts Court, including McCutcheon v. FEC (2014), would strike down other campaign finance restrictions.

John Paul Stevens

Justice StevensStevensJohn P. Stevens
Roberts took the Constitutional oath of office, administered by senior Associate Justice John Paul Stevens (who was the acting Chief Justice during the vacancy) at the White House, on September 29, 2005, almost immediately after his confirmation.
In Five Chiefs, Stevens recounts his time as a law clerk during the tenure of Chief Justice Vinson; his experiences as a private attorney during the Warren era; and his experience while serving as an Associate Justice on the Burger, Rehnquist, and Roberts courts.

Rehnquist Court

Rehnquist
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer. It is generally considered more conservative than the preceding Rehnquist Court, as a result of the retirement of moderate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and the subsequent confirmation of the more conservative Justice Samuel Alito in her place.

John Roberts Supreme Court nomination

nominated(Nominated and Confirmed)78–22
Roberts was originally nominated by President George W. Bush to replace Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who had decided to retire from the Court, effective with the confirmation of her successor.

Barack Obama

ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obama
In 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Sonia Sotomayor to replace Souter, and in 2010 Obama nominated Elena Kagan to replace Stevens.

List of United States Supreme Court cases by the Roberts Court

United States Supreme Court cases during the Roberts Courtlist of cases decided by the Roberts courtList of U.S. Supreme Court cases during the Roberts Court
This is a partial chronological list of cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the Roberts Court, the tenure of Chief Justice John Roberts from September 29, 2005 to the present.

Chief Justice of the United States

Chief JusticeChief Justice of the United States Supreme CourtChief Justice of the Supreme Court
The Roberts Court is the time since 2005 during which the Supreme Court of the United States has been led by Chief Justice John Roberts.

John Roberts

John G. RobertsRobertsChief Justice Roberts
The Roberts Court is the time since 2005 during which the Supreme Court of the United States has been led by Chief Justice John Roberts.

Sandra Day O'Connor

Justice O'ConnorSandra Day O’ConnorO'Connor
It is generally considered more conservative than the preceding Rehnquist Court, as a result of the retirement of moderate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and the subsequent confirmation of the more conservative Justice Samuel Alito in her place. Roberts was originally nominated by President George W. Bush to replace Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who had decided to retire from the Court, effective with the confirmation of her successor.

Samuel Alito

AlitoJustice AlitoJustice Samuel Alito
It is generally considered more conservative than the preceding Rehnquist Court, as a result of the retirement of moderate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and the subsequent confirmation of the more conservative Justice Samuel Alito in her place. President Bush nominated Samuel Alito (after the withdrawal of Bush's first nominee, White House Counsel Harriet Miers) to replace O'Connor, and he was confirmed in January 2006.

George W. Bush

BushPresident BushPresident George W. Bush
Roberts was originally nominated by President George W. Bush to replace Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who had decided to retire from the Court, effective with the confirmation of her successor.

William Rehnquist

William H. RehnquistRehnquistChief Justice Rehnquist
However, before the Senate could act upon Roberts' nomination to be an Associate Justice, Chief Justice William Rehnquist died, and President Bush nominated Roberts for the Chief Justice vacancy.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
Roberts took the Constitutional oath of office, administered by senior Associate Justice John Paul Stevens (who was the acting Chief Justice during the vacancy) at the White House, on September 29, 2005, almost immediately after his confirmation.

Oath of office

coronation oathoathoaths of office
Roberts took the Constitutional oath of office, administered by senior Associate Justice John Paul Stevens (who was the acting Chief Justice during the vacancy) at the White House, on September 29, 2005, almost immediately after his confirmation.

White House

The White HouseExecutive MansionPresident's House
Roberts took the Constitutional oath of office, administered by senior Associate Justice John Paul Stevens (who was the acting Chief Justice during the vacancy) at the White House, on September 29, 2005, almost immediately after his confirmation.

Judiciary Act of 1789

Judiciary Act61789
On October 3, Roberts took the judicial oath provided for by the Judiciary Act of 1789, prior to the first oral arguments of the 2005 term.

Antonin Scalia

Justice ScaliaScaliaJustice Antonin Scalia
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer.

Clarence Thomas

ThomasJustice ThomasJustice Clarence Thomas
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

GinsburgJustice GinsburgJustice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer.

Stephen Breyer

BreyerJustice BreyerStephen G. Breyer
The Roberts Court commenced with Roberts as Chief Justice and eight holdovers from the Rehnquist Court: Stevens, O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, David Souter, Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer.

Samuel Alito Supreme Court nomination

nominated58–42attempted a filibuster
President Bush nominated Samuel Alito (after the withdrawal of Bush's first nominee, White House Counsel Harriet Miers) to replace O'Connor, and he was confirmed in January 2006.

White House Counsel

Deputy White House CounselCounsel to the PresidentSpecial Counsel
President Bush nominated Samuel Alito (after the withdrawal of Bush's first nominee, White House Counsel Harriet Miers) to replace O'Connor, and he was confirmed in January 2006.