Robinson Crusoe Island

April 2005 view of the town of San Juan Bautista, on the north coast at Cumberland Bay
, just prior to its scuttling in Cumberland Bay
A fisherman with two spiny lobsters off Robinson Crusoe Island
Robinson Crusoe Island bayside view of the town of San Juan Bautista
Robinson Crusoe Island statue of Robinson Crusoe in the town of San Juan Bautista
Robinson Crusoe Island Dendroseris litoralis – Juan Fernández cabbage tree

Second largest of the Juan Fernández Islands, situated 670 km (362 nmi; 416 mi) west of San Antonio, Chile, in the South Pacific Ocean.

- Robinson Crusoe Island
April 2005 view of the town of San Juan Bautista, on the north coast at Cumberland Bay

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Title page from the first edition

Robinson Crusoe

Novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

Novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

Title page from the first edition
Pictorial map of Crusoe's island, the "Island of Despair", showing incidents from the book
The route taken by Robinson Crusoe over the Pyrenees mountains in chapters 19 & 20 of Defoe's novel, as envisaged by Joseph Ribas
Statue of Robinson Crusoe at Alexander Selkirk's birthplace of Lower Largo by Thomas Stuart Burnett
Book on Alexander Selkirk
Plaque in Queen's Gardens, Hull, showing him on his island
Crusoe standing over Friday after he frees him from the cannibals
Robinson Crusoe bookstore on İstiklal Avenue, Istanbul

The story has been thought to be based on the life of Alexander Selkirk, a Scottish castaway who lived for four years on a Pacific island called "Más a Tierra" (now part of Chile) which was renamed Robinson Crusoe Island in 1966.

Landsat 7 image of the Juan Fernández Islands on 15 September 1999, shows the unique pattern of clouds known as "Kármán vortex street" caused by the interaction of winds with the islands' mountains

Juan Fernández Islands

The Juan Fernández Islands (Archipiélago Juan Fernández) are a sparsely inhabited island group in the South Pacific Ocean reliant on tourism and fishing.

The Juan Fernández Islands (Archipiélago Juan Fernández) are a sparsely inhabited island group in the South Pacific Ocean reliant on tourism and fishing.

Landsat 7 image of the Juan Fernández Islands on 15 September 1999, shows the unique pattern of clouds known as "Kármán vortex street" caused by the interaction of winds with the islands' mountains
Robinson Crusoe Island, as seen in the late 19th or early 20th century. The ship in Cumberland Bay is the cruiser Esmeralda.
in March 1915, shortly before its scuttling in Cumberland Bay
Map of Robinson Crusoe Island (including Santa Clara Island)
Map of Alejandro Selkirk Island
Map of both islands
Satellite images of Juan Fernández Islands (Alejandro Selkirk Island, inset left)
overview map

Situated 670 km off the coast of Chile, they are composed of three main volcanic islands: Robinson Crusoe, Alejandro Selkirk and Santa Clara.

Clad in goatskins, Selkirk awaits rescue in a sculpture by Thomas Stuart Burnett (1885)

Alexander Selkirk

Clad in goatskins, Selkirk awaits rescue in a sculpture by Thomas Stuart Burnett (1885)
Map of Robinson Crusoe island (formerly Más a Tierra island), where Selkirk lived as a castaway
Selkirk reading his Bible in one of two huts he built on a mountainside
The rescued Selkirk, seated at right, being taken aboard Duke.
An illustration of Crusoe in goatskin clothing shows the influence of Selkirk
Title page from The Life and Adventures of Alexander Selkirk, the Real Robinson Crusoe (1835), by an unknown author
Plaque for Selkirk in Lower Largo, Scotland, which reads: "In memory of Alexander Selkirk, mariner, the original of Robinson Crusoe who lived on the island of Juan Fernández in complete solitude for four years and four months. He died 1723 [sic], lieutenant of HMS Weymouth, aged 47 years. This statue is erected by David Gillies, net manufacturer, on the site of the cottage in which Selkirk was born."

Alexander Selkirk (1676 – 13 December 1721) was a Scottish privateer and Royal Navy officer who spent four years and four months as a castaway (1704–1709) after being marooned by his captain, initially at his request, on an uninhabited island in the South Pacific Ocean.

A view of Alejandro Selkirk Island

Alejandro Selkirk Island

Largest and most westerly island in the Juan Fernández Archipelago of the Valparaíso Region of Chile.

Largest and most westerly island in the Juan Fernández Archipelago of the Valparaíso Region of Chile.

A view of Alejandro Selkirk Island
The Masafuera rayadito is endemic to Alejandro Selkirk
The extinct Alejandro Selkirk firecrown, Sephanoides fernandensis leyboldi

It is situated 180 km west of Robinson Crusoe Island in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

Marooned by Howard Pyle

Marooning

Intentional act of abandoning someone in an uninhabited area, such as a desert island, or more generally to be marooned is to be in a place from which one cannot escape.

Intentional act of abandoning someone in an uninhabited area, such as a desert island, or more generally to be marooned is to be in a place from which one cannot escape.

Marooned by Howard Pyle

A famous real-life marooning, initially at Selkirk's request, was leaving the sailor Alexander Selkirk on Juan Fernández Island off the coast of Chile, in the Pacific Ocean.

Daniel Defoe

English writer, trader, journalist, pamphleteer and spy.

English writer, trader, journalist, pamphleteer and spy.

Daniel Defoe in the pillory, 1862 line engraving by James Charles Armytage after Eyre Crowe
Title page from Daniel Defoe's: The History of the Union of Great Britain dated 1709 and printed in Edinburgh by the Heirs of Anderson
Glasgow Bridge as Defoe might have seen it in the 18th century
Memorial to "Daniel De-Foe", Bunhill Fields, City Road, Borough of Islington, London
A house where Defoe once lived, near London, England
Bunhill Fields monument detail

The island Selkirk lived on, Más a Tierra (Closer to Land) was renamed Robinson Crusoe Island in 1966.

Easter Island

Island and special territory of Chile in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle in Oceania.

Island and special territory of Chile in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle in Oceania.

Traditional cultivars of sweet potato (kumara) were staple crops on Polynesian Rapa Nui
Moai at Rano Raraku, Easter Island
A View of the Monuments of Easter Island, Rapanui, c. undefined 1775–1776 by William Hodges.
Rapa Nui people, painted by Louis Choris, 1816
Motu Nui islet, part of the Birdman Cult ceremony
Jacob Roggeveen analyzing a Moai statue, 18th-century engraving.
La Pérouse at Easter Island in 1786
"Queen Mother" Koreto with her daughters "Queen" Caroline and Harriette in 1877
General Pinochet posing with a young Rapa Nui woman
Manu Piri symbolizes love and union between two people. The slogan of the current administration is "Rapa Nui hai mahatu", translated as "Rapa Nui with love".
Souvenir Moai from Rapa Nui, bought at the Artisan's Market, 2020
Easter Island, Isla Salas y Gómez, South America and the islands in between
Detailed map of Rapa Nui/Easter Island
Typical landscape on Easter Island; rounded extinct volcanoes covered in low vegetation.
Bird paintings in the cave called "Cave of the Men Eaters"
Two ahu at Hanga Roa. In foreground Ahu Ko Te Riku (with a pukao on its head). In the mid-ground is a side view of an ahu with five moai showing retaining wall, platform, ramp and pavement. The Mataveri end of Hanga Roa is visible in the background with Rano Kau rising above it.
A Hare Moa, a Chicken House, image cut from a laser scan collected by nonprofit CyArk.
Sample of rongorongo
Ancestor figure, circa 1830, from LACMA collections
Satellite view of Easter Island 2019. The Poike peninsula is on the right.
Digital recreation of its ancient landscape, with tropical forest and palm trees
Hanga Roa seen from Terevaka, the highest point of the island
View of Rano Kau and Pacific Ocean
Tukuturi, an unusual bearded kneeling moai
All fifteen standing moai at Ahu Tongariki, excavated and restored in the 1990s
Ahu Akivi, one of the few inland ahu, with the only moai facing the ocean
Makemake with two birdmen, carved from red scoria
Fish petroglyph found near Ahu Tongariki
Polynesian dancing with feather costumes is on the tourist itinerary.
Hanga Roa town hall
Fishing boats
Front view of the Catholic Church, Hanga Roa
Catholic Church, Hanga Roa
Interior view of the Catholic Church in Hanga Roa

On 30 July 2007, a constitutional reform gave Easter Island and the Juan Fernández Islands (also known as Robinson Crusoe Island) the status of "special territories" of Chile.

U.S. merchant seamen try to revive a shipwrecked Filipino fisherman rescued in the South China Sea (1983)

Castaway

Person who is cast adrift or ashore.

Person who is cast adrift or ashore.

U.S. merchant seamen try to revive a shipwrecked Filipino fisherman rescued in the South China Sea (1983)
Castaways may need to survive on a deserted island.
Robinson Crusoe (1719) by Daniel Defoe. Illustration of Crusoe standing over Man Friday after freeing him from the cannibals.

In 1681, a Miskito named Will by his English comrades was sent ashore as part of an English foraging party to Más a Tierra.

Lactoris

Lactoris fernandeziana — 1888 botanical illustration.

Lactoris fernandeziana is a flowering shrub endemic to the cloud forest of Masatierra — Robinson Crusoe Island, of the Juan Fernández Islands archipelago of Chile.

San Juan Bautista, Chile

Main town in the Juan Fernández Islands of Chile.

Main town in the Juan Fernández Islands of Chile.

Mapa de la isla de San Juan Bautista

It is located on Cumberland Bay on the center of the northeast coast of Robinson Crusoe Island.