Rock climbing

rock climberrock climbersrock-climbingclimbingrock climbrockrockclimbingtechnical climbingrock climbsclimbers
Rock climbing is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls.wikipedia
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Pitch (ascent/descent)

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It is very rare for a climber to downclimb, especially on the larger multiple pitches (class III- IV and /or multi-day grades IV-VI climbs).
In rock climbing and ice climbing, a pitch is a steep section of a route that requires a rope between two belays, as part of a climbing system.

Free climbing

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Today, free climbing, climbing using holds made entirely of natural rock while using gear solely for protection and not for upward movement, is the most popular form of the sport.
Free climbing is a form of rock climbing in which the climber may use climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist progress.

Grade (climbing)

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Over time, grading systems have also been created in order to compare more accurately the relative difficulties of the rock climbs.
In rock climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing disciplines, climbers give a grade to a climbing route or boulder problem, intended to describe concisely the difficulty and danger of climbing it. Different types of climbing (such as sport climbing, bouldering or ice climbing) each have their own grading systems, and many nationalities developed their own, distinctive grading systems.

John Long (climber)

John LongLong, John
In How to Rock Climb, John Long notes that for moderately skilled climbers simply getting to the top of a route is not enough; how one gets to the top matters.
John Long (born July 21, 1953) is an American rock climber and author whose stories have been translated into many languages.

Anchor (climbing)

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Climbers will usually work in pairs and utilize a system of ropes and anchors designed to catch falls.
In rock climbing, an anchor can be any device or method for attaching a climber, a rope, or a load to the climbing surface - typically rock, ice, steep dirt, or a building - either permanently or temporarily.

Bouldering

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Generally speaking, beginners will start with top roping and/or easy bouldering and work their way up to lead climbing and beyond.
Bouldering is a form of rock climbing that is performed on small rock formations or artificial rock walls, known as boulders, without the use of ropes or harnesses.

Climbing wall

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Rock climbing is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls.
Indoor climbing is an increasingly popular form of rock climbing performed on artificial structures that attempt to mimic the experience of outdoor rock.

Sport climbing

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Subtypes of free climbing are trad climbing and sport climbing. Eventually, the placement of bolts with the use of quickdraws led to the rise of sport climbing.
Sport climbing is a form of rock climbing that relies on permanent anchors fixed to the rock for protection.

Climbing

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Rock climbing is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls. Free climbing has since been divided into several sub-styles of climbing dependent on belay configuration.
Free Climbing: a form of rock climbing in which the climber uses climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist progress.

Lead climbing

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Generally speaking, beginners will start with top roping and/or easy bouldering and work their way up to lead climbing and beyond.
This technique is predominantly used in rock climbing and involves a lead climber attaching themselves to a length of dynamic (elastic) climbing rope and ascending a route while periodically attaching protection (quickdraws or traditional protection) to the face of the route and clipping into it. The lead climber must have another person acting as a belayer.

Spring-loaded camming device

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As the leader progresses they clip the rope into, using a runner and carabiners, intermediate points of protection such as active cams, or passive protection such as nuts; this limits the length of a potential fall.
A spring-loaded camming device (also SLCD, cam or friend) is a piece of rock climbing or mountaineering protection equipment.

Bolt (climbing)

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The leader also may clip into pre-placed bolts. Eventually, the placement of bolts with the use of quickdraws led to the rise of sport climbing.
In rock climbing, a bolt is a permanent anchor fixed into a hole drilled in the rock as a form of protection.

Nut (climbing)

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As the leader progresses they clip the rope into, using a runner and carabiners, intermediate points of protection such as active cams, or passive protection such as nuts; this limits the length of a potential fall.
In rock climbing, a nut (or chock or chockstone) is a metal wedge threaded on a wire and is used for protection by wedging it into a crack in the rock.

Mountaineering

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Early European climbers used rock climbing techniques as a skill required to reach the summit in their mountaineering exploits.
A rock climber's skill is shown by their choice of handhold and foothold, and their adhesion to the holds once chosen.

Yosemite Decimal System

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The most commonly used rating systems in the United States are the Yosemite Decimal System and the Hueco V-scale bouldering grade. The current ranges for climbing routes are 5.0 for easy beginner routes to 5.15 being world class and V0 - V16, respectively.
The class 5 portion of the class scale is primarily a rock climbing classification system, while classes 1–2 are used mainly in hiking and trail running.

Yosemite Valley

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Aid climbing, climbing using equipment that acts as artificial handhold or footholds, became popular during the period 1920-1960, leading to ascents in the Alps and in Yosemite Valley that were considered impossible without such means.
Yosemite is now a world rock climbing attraction.

Multi-pitch climbing

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Routes longer than the rope length are broken up into several segments called pitches; this is known as multi-pitch climbing.
The leader ascends the pitch, placing gear and stopping to anchor themselves to the belay station.

Lead climbing injuries

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Injuries from lead climbing are common.
The greatest potential for injury while rock climbing occurs when a lead climber falls.

Quickdraw

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Eventually, the placement of bolts with the use of quickdraws led to the rise of sport climbing.
A quickdraw (also known as an extender) is a piece of climbing equipment used by rock and ice climbers to allow the climbing rope to run freely through bolt anchors or other protection while leading.

City of Rocks National Reserve

City of RocksCassia Silent City of Rocks
The potential threat to these resources has led to climbing restrictions and closures in places like Hueco Tanks, Texas, and portions of City of Rocks National Reserve, Idaho.
It is widely known for its excellent rock climbing and rock formations.

Belaying

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Free climbing has since been divided into several sub-styles of climbing dependent on belay configuration.
Belaying is a critical part of the climbing system.

Callus

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Such injuries are often no worse than torn calluses, cuts, burns and bruises.
Activities that are notorious for causing calluses include (but are not limited to) construction work, many sports, wood carving, playing musical instruments, use of a chef's knife, rock climbing, hiking, martial arts, weight training, rowing, BMXing, dancing (especially ballet), chopping wood, monkey bars and wearing high heels.

Dean Potter

Professional climber Dean Potter kicked off a major controversy when he ignored long-accepted convention to scale Delicate Arch in 2006, resulting in strict new climbing regulation in Arches National Park.
Dean S. Potter (April 14, 1972 – May 16, 2015) was an American free climber, alpinist, Base jumper, BASEliner, and highliner.

Climbing competition

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Professional rock climbing competitions have the objectives of either completing the route in the quickest possible time or attaining the farthest point on an increasingly difficult route.
Rock Climbing

Clean climbing

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Clean climbing is a style of rock climbing which seeks to minimize some of the aesthetically damaging side effects of some techniques used in trad climbing and more often, aid climbing by avoiding using equipment such as pitons, which damage rock.
Clean climbing is rock climbing techniques and equipment which climbers use in order to avoid damage to the rock.