Rod (unit)

rodsrodperchesperchRoodpolepolesRood (Scots)square perchessquare rod
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters).wikipedia
298 Related Articles

Furlong

furlongsf7 furlongs
The 'perfect acre' is a rectangular area of 43,560 square feet, bounded by sides 660 feet (a furlong) long and 66 feet wide (220 yards and 22 yards) or, equivalently, 40 rods and 4 rods. There are 40 square perches to a rood (e.g., a rectangular area one furlong (10 chains i.e. 40 rods) in length by one rod in width), and 160 square perches to an acre (an area one furlong by one chain (i.e. 4 rods)). In Ireland, a perch was standardized at 21 ft, making an Irish chain, furlong and mile proportionately longer by 27.27% than the "standard" English measure.
A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains.

Foot (unit)

feetftfoot
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters).
The barleycorn, inch, ell, and yard were likewise shrunk, while rods and furlongs remained the same.

Ancient Roman units of measurement

Roman feetRoman poundmodius
The name perch derives from the Ancient Roman unit, the pertica.

Mile

miRoman milemiles
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters).
Owing to the importance of the surveyor's rod in deeds and surveying undertaken under Henry VIII, decreasing the length of the rod by 1⁄11 would have amounted to a significant tax increase.

Link (unit)

linklinks
A chain is a larger unit of length measuring 66 ft, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 meters).

Chain (unit)

chainschainchainage
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters). A chain is a larger unit of length measuring 66 ft, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 meters).
It is subdivided into 100 links or 4 rods.

Acre

acresacreageac
The rod is useful as a unit of length because whole number multiples of it can form one acre of square measure. There are 40 square perches to a rood (e.g., a rectangular area one furlong (10 chains i.e. 40 rods) in length by one rod in width), and 160 square perches to an acre (an area one furlong by one chain (i.e. 4 rods)).
Originally, an acre was understood as a selion of land sized at forty perches (660 ft, or 1 furlong) long and four perches (66 ft) wide; this may have also been understood as an approximation of the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plough in one day (a furlong being 'a furrow long').

Scottish units

Obsolete Scottish units of measurementbollsBoll
In traditional Scottish units, a Scottish rood (ruid in Lowland Scots, ròd in Scottish Gaelic), also fall measures 222 inches.
Identical to the Scots rod and raip ("rope").

Composition of Yards and Perches

Act on the Composition of Yards and Perchesa statute of c. 1300agricultural practice
In England, the rod or perch was first defined in law by the Composition of Yards and Perches, one of the statutes of uncertain date from the late 13th to early 14th centuries: tres pedes faciunt ulnam, quinque ulne & dimidia faciunt perticam (three feet make a yard, five and a half yards make a perch).
The Composition of Yards and Perches (Compositio Ulnarum et Perticarum) or the Statute of Ells and Perches was a medieval English statute defining the length of the barleycorn, inch, foot, yard, and perch, as well as the area of the acre.

Yard

yardsydTotal return yards
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters). A chain is a larger unit of length measuring 66 ft, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 meters).
In addition to the yardland, Old and Middle English both used their forms of "yard" to denote the surveying lengths of 15 or 16 1⁄2 ft used in computing acres, a distance now usually known as the "rod".

United States customary units

USUS customary unitsU.S. customary units
In the US, the rod, along with the chain, furlong, and statute mile (as well as the survey inch and survey foot) are based on the pre-1959 values for United States customary units of linear measurement.

Rood (unit)

roodroods
There are 40 square perches to a rood (e.g., a rectangular area one furlong (10 chains i.e. 40 rods) in length by one rod in width), and 160 square perches to an acre (an area one furlong by one chain (i.e. 4 rods)).
Rood is an archaic word for "pole", from Old English rōd "pole", specifically "cross", from Proto-Germanic *rodo, cognate to Old Saxon rōda, Old High German ruoda "rod"; the relation of rood to rod, from Old English rodd "pole", is unclear; the latter was perhaps influenced by Old Norse rudda "club".

Metes and bounds

metes-and-boundsmetemetes
Rods can also be found on the older legal descriptions of tracts of land in the United States, following the "metes and bounds" method of land survey; as shown in this actual legal description of rural real estate: "LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Commencing 45 rods East and 44 rods North of Southwest corner of Southwest 1/4 of Southwest 1/4; thence North 36 rods; thence East 35 rods; thence South 36 rods; thence West 35 rods to the place of beginning, Manistique Township, Schoolcraft County, Michigan."
In most distance measures, especially those in older deeds and where measuring distances over a furlong, boundary lengths are listed in rods or poles instead of feet or meters.

Fall (unit)

fall
In traditional Scottish units, a Scottish rood (ruid in Lowland Scots, ròd in Scottish Gaelic), also fall measures 222 inches.

Allotment (gardening)

allotmentallotmentsallotment gardens
In the United Kingdom, the sizes of allotment gardens continue to be measured in square poles in some areas, sometimes being referred to simply as poles rather than square poles.
The rent is set at what a person "may reasonably be expected to pay" (1950); in 1997 the average rent for a ten square rods (250 m 2 ) plot was £22 a year.

Surveying

surveyorsurveyland surveyor
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters).

Length

widthlengthsbreadth
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters). A chain is a larger unit of length measuring 66 ft, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 meters).

Metre

metermmetres
The rod or perch or pole (sometimes also lug) is a surveyor’s tool and unit of length exactly equal to 5 1⁄2 yards, 16 feet, of a statute mile, or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain (approximately 5.0292 meters). A chain is a larger unit of length measuring 66 ft, or 22 yards, or 100 links, or 4 rods (20.1168 meters).

Pike (weapon)

pikepikespikemen
The measure also has a relationship to the military pike of about the same size.

Lidar

laser altimeterLight Detection and Ranging3D laser scanning
The tool has largely been supplanted by electronic tools such as surveyor lasers (Lidar) and optical target devices for surveying lands.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom

House of CommonsBritish House of CommonsCommons
In the 13th century perches were variously recorded in lengths of 18 ft, 20 ft, 22 ft and 24 ft; and even as late as 1820, a House of Commons report notes lengths of 16+1/2 ft, 18 ft, 21 ft, 24 ft, and even 25 ft.

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
In Ireland, a perch was standardized at 21 ft, making an Irish chain, furlong and mile proportionately longer by 27.27% than the "standard" English measure.

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIIIKing Henry VIIIKing Henry VIII of England
Until English King Henry VIII seized the lands of the Roman Catholic Church in 1536, land measures as we now know them were essentially unknown.