A report on Roer (department)

Roer (red) besides other departments in the North of the French Empire, 1811
Map of the Roer departement, circa the early 1800s.

Department of the French First Republic and later First French Empire in present-day Germany and the Netherlands.

- Roer (department)

19 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Jülich highlighted in red

Duchy of Jülich

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The Duchy of Jülich (Herzogtum Jülich; Hertogdom Gulik; Duché de Juliers) comprised a state within the Holy Roman Empire from the 11th to the 18th centuries.

The Duchy of Jülich (Herzogtum Jülich; Hertogdom Gulik; Duché de Juliers) comprised a state within the Holy Roman Empire from the 11th to the 18th centuries.

Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Jülich highlighted in red
Nideggen Castle
Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Jülich highlighted in red
map of the Duchy of Jülich-Berg from Theater of the World, or a New Atlas of Maps and Representations of All Regions, edited by Willem and Joan Blaeu, 1645

In 1794 Revolutionary France occupied the Duchy of Jülich (Duché de Juliers), which became part of the French département of the Roer.

Aachen

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Aachen (Aachen dialect: Oche ; French and traditional English: Aix-la-Chapelle; Aquae Granni or Aquisgranum; Aken) is, with around 249,000 inhabitants, the 13th-largest city in North Rhine-Westphalia, and the 28th-largest city of Germany.

Aachen (Aachen dialect: Oche ; French and traditional English: Aix-la-Chapelle; Aquae Granni or Aquisgranum; Aken) is, with around 249,000 inhabitants, the 13th-largest city in North Rhine-Westphalia, and the 28th-largest city of Germany.

Aachen districts and quarters
Construction of Aix-la-Chapelle, by Jean Fouquet
Presentation of the four "Great Relics" during the Aachen pilgrimage, after a 17th-century painting
The siege of Aachen by the Spanish Army of Flanders under Ambrogio Spinola in 1614
View of Aachen in 1690
The modern Elisabethhalle pool
View of the Old Synagogue in Aachen after its destruction during Kristallnacht, November 1938
The tripoint, where the borders of Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands meet at the Vaalserberg
Layered sandstone and claystone formation from the Devonian period below St. Adalbert Church in Aachen
Age distribution of Aachen's population next to Germany's (2014)
Results of the 2020 city council election.
Aachen Cathedral
Cross of Lothair, Aachen Cathedral Treasury
Aachen Rathaus seen from the south
Ford Research Center, Aachen
StreetScooter Work as DHL delivery van (2016)
Aachen is also famous for its carnival (Karneval, Fasching), in which families dress in colourful costumes
The main building of RWTH Aachen University
Typical Aachen street with early 20th-century Gründerzeit houses
Another example of Aachen early 20th-century Gründerzeit houses
New Tivoli, home ground of Alemannia Aachen
Bi-articulated bus of the city's transit authority ASEAG, at the university hospital bus stop
Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel, wearing the Charlemagne Prize awarded to her in 2008
Grashaus
Elisenbrunnen in Aachen
Aachen Theatre
Neues Kurhaus
Carolus Thermen, thermal baths named after Charlemagne
A statue commemorating David Hansemann

By the middle of the 19th century, industrialisation had swept away most of the city's medieval rules of production and commerce, although the entirely corrupt remains of the city's medieval constitution were kept in place (compare the famous remarks of Georg Forster in his Ansichten vom Niederrhein) until 1801, when Aachen became the "chef-lieu du département de la Roer" in Napoleon's First French Empire.

Duchy of Guelders and the County of Zutphen, about 1350

Guelders

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Historical county, later duchy of the Holy Roman Empire, located in the Low Countries.

Historical county, later duchy of the Holy Roman Empire, located in the Low Countries.

Duchy of Guelders and the County of Zutphen, about 1350
Guelders officer of arms wearing a tabard of the shield, c. 1395
Duchy of Guelders and the County of Zutphen, about 1350
before 1236
from 1236
from 1276
Jülich-Guelders after 1393

In 1795 Guelders was finally conquered and incorporated by the French First Republic, and partitioned between the départements of Roer and Meuse-Inférieure.

Rur

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Major river that flows through portions of Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

Major river that flows through portions of Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

The Rur between Monschau and Dedenborn during winter
The Rur in the High Fens
Map of river Rur/Roer and its tributaries
The Rur near Hückelhoven.

In 1795, until 1814, during which time the area was part of the French Republic and Empire, it gave its name to the French département of the Roer.

Eastern walls of the castle of the Dukes of Jülich (13th century).

Monschau

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Small resort town in the Eifel region of western Germany, located in the Aachen district of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Small resort town in the Eifel region of western Germany, located in the Aachen district of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Eastern walls of the castle of the Dukes of Jülich (13th century).
Monschau, timberframe houses
Historic center of Monschau at the Rur
Protestant Church in Monschau with the tower removed
Monschau, reformed church
Monschau, view at the Markt
Monschau, castle (Burg Monschau)-youth hostel
Monschau, hotel in the street
Monschau, monumental house: das Rote Haus
Street in Monschau
Monschau, monumental house in der Eschbachstrasse

In 1795, the French captured the area and, under the name Montjoie, made it the capital of a canton of the Roer département.

Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Cleves highlighted in red

Duchy of Cleves

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State of the Holy Roman Empire which emerged from the medieval Hettergau.

State of the Holy Roman Empire which emerged from the medieval Hettergau.

Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Cleves highlighted in red
Schwanenburg Castle, Cleves
Map of the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle around 1560, Duchy of Cleves highlighted in red
map of the Duchy of Cleves and Ravenstein domain from Theater of the World, or a New Atlas of Maps and Representations of All Regions, edited by Willem and Joan Blaeu, 1645
Old Cleves family coat of arms

In 1795 the Duchy of Cleves west of the Rhine and Wesel was occupied by France, and became part of the French département of the Roer.

Castle of Kambach

Eschweiler

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Municipality in the district of Aachen in North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany on the river Inde, near the German-Belgian-Dutch border, and about 15 km east of Aachen and 50 km west of Cologne.

Municipality in the district of Aachen in North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany on the river Inde, near the German-Belgian-Dutch border, and about 15 km east of Aachen and 50 km west of Cologne.

Castle of Kambach
Castle of Roethgen
Eschweiler Central Station
The Leather Pietà
Castle of Palant
Castle of Kinzweiler
Old Townhall
Eschweiler's power plant next to the A 4

1800 French municipal rights and capital of the Canton of Eschweiler in the French Département de la Roer.

Prussian Guelders

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The part of the Duchy of Guelders ruled by the Kingdom of Prussia from 1713.

The part of the Duchy of Guelders ruled by the Kingdom of Prussia from 1713.

Prussian Guelders was occupied by Revolutionary France in 1794 and later annexed into the First French Empire as part of the Roer Department.

Sittard

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City in the Netherlands, situated in the southernmost province of Limburg.

City in the Netherlands, situated in the southernmost province of Limburg.

Close up of Sittard's ancient market square.
Stylish buildings of a street in the ancient city centre.
St Peter's church, Sittard
SABIC office, Sittard
Sittard city park
Museum Het Domein, Sittard
Map of Sittard per March 2014 (readable after three clicks)
Sittard city wall
Sittard train station
Nearby fields

Under French occupation (1794-1814), Sittard was part of the Roer department.

Geldern

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City in the federal German state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

City in the federal German state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Spanish-ruled Guelder in 1649
Siege of Guelder in 1703
St. Mary Magdalene church
Town hall
Steprath Mill
Geldern train station

The canton of Geldern was part of the arrondissement of Cleves, which was a part of the département of the Roer.