Rollback

roll backactive measures to defeatrolling backundermine or overthrow pro-Soviet governmentswith force
In political science, rollback is the strategy of forcing a change in the major policies of a state, usually by replacing its ruling regime.wikipedia
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Containment

containcontainingcontainment policy
It contrasts with containment, which means preventing the expansion of that state; and with détente, which means a working relationship with that state. A strategic alternative to rollback was containment, and the Eisenhower Administration adopted containment through National Security Council document NSC 162/2 in October 1953; this effectively abandoned the rollback efforts in Europe.
Containment represented a middle-ground position between detente (relaxation of relations) and rollback (actively replacing a regime).

Regime change

regime changesadministrative changeschange of regime
When directed against an established government, rollback is sometimes called "regime change".
Rollback is the military strategy to impose a regime change by defeating an enemy and removing its regime by force.

Cold War

The Cold WarCold War eraCold-War
Most of the discussions of rollback in the scholarly literature deal with United States foreign policy toward Communist countries during the Cold War.
Truman, under the influence of advisor Paul Nitze, saw containment as implying complete rollback of Soviet influence in all its forms.

Détente

detentedetentéDétente policy
It contrasts with containment, which means preventing the expansion of that state; and with détente, which means a working relationship with that state.

Presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower

Eisenhower administrationEisenhowerEisenhower Ten
A strategic alternative to rollback was containment, and the Eisenhower Administration adopted containment through National Security Council document NSC 162/2 in October 1953; this effectively abandoned the rollback efforts in Europe.
Eisenhower's overall Cold War policy was described by NSC174, which held that the rollback of Soviet influence was a long-term goal, but that the United States would not provoke war with the Soviet Union.

Hungarian Revolution of 1956

Hungarian Revolution1956 Hungarian RevolutionSoviet invasion of Hungary
The political leadership of the United States discussed the use of rollback during the uprising of 1953 in East Germany and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, but decided against it to avoid the risk of Soviet intervention or a major war.
For these reasons, U.S. policy makers had to consider other means of diminishing Soviet influence in Eastern Europe, short of a rollback policy.

John Foster Dulles

DullesFoster DullesJohn
Republican spokesman John Foster Dulles took the lead in promoting a rollback policy.
In the late 1940s, as a general conceptual framework for contending with world communism, Dulles developed the policy known as rollback to serve as the Republican Party's alternative to the Democrats' containment model.

Reagan Doctrine

ReaganAmerica's supportCold War policies
Reagan's interventions in the Third World came to be known as the Reagan Doctrine.
Under the Reagan Doctrine, the United States provided overt and covert aid to anti-communist guerrillas and resistance movements in an effort to "roll back" Soviet-backed pro-communist governments in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Caspar Weinberger

Caspar W. WeinbergerWeinbergerCaspar Willard Weinberger
In 1984, journalist Nicholas Lemann interviewed Reagan Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger.
Weinberger took the lead in implementing a rollback strategy against Soviet communism.

Presidency of Ronald Reagan

Reagan administrationReagan RevolutionReagan
The "rollback" movement gained significant ground, however, in the 1980s, specifically against the Soviet Union, as the Reagan administration urged on by The Heritage Foundation and other influential conservatives began to channel weapons to movements such as the Mujahedin in Afghanistan, the Contras in Nicaragua and others in anti-communist armed movements Angola, Cambodia and other nations, and launched a successful invasion of Grenada in 1983 to protect American residents and reinstate constitutional government following a coup by what Reagan called "a brutal gang of leftist thugs,"—this invasion was presented as a dramatic example of rolling back a Communist government in power.
Reagan's foreign policy stance was resolutely anti-communist; its plan of action, known as the Reagan Doctrine, sought to roll back the global influence of the Soviet Union in an attempt to end the Cold War.

Political science

political scientistPolitical Sciencespolitical analyst
In political science, rollback is the strategy of forcing a change in the major policies of a state, usually by replacing its ruling regime.

Foreign policy of the United States

U.S. foreign policyAmerican foreign policyforeign policy
Most of the discussions of rollback in the scholarly literature deal with United States foreign policy toward Communist countries during the Cold War.

Communist state

Communist regimecommunist countriescommunist
Most of the discussions of rollback in the scholarly literature deal with United States foreign policy toward Communist countries during the Cold War.

Korean War

KoreaKoreanKorea War
The rollback strategy was tried and was not successful in Korea in 1950 and in Cuba in 1961, but it was successful in Grenada in 1983.

Bay of Pigs Invasion

Bay of PigsinvasionThe Bay of Pigs Invasion
The rollback strategy was tried and was not successful in Korea in 1950 and in Cuba in 1961, but it was successful in Grenada in 1983.

East German uprising of 1953

Uprising of 1953 in East Germany1953East German uprising
The political leadership of the United States discussed the use of rollback during the uprising of 1953 in East Germany and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, but decided against it to avoid the risk of Soviet intervention or a major war.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
The political leadership of the United States discussed the use of rollback during the uprising of 1953 in East Germany and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, but decided against it to avoid the risk of Soviet intervention or a major war.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Rollback of governments hostile to the U.S. took place in World War II (against Italy 1943, Germany 1945 and Japan 1945), Afghanistan (against the Taliban 2001) and Iraq (against Saddam Hussein 2003).

War in Afghanistan (2001–present)

War in AfghanistanAfghanistanAfghanistan War
Rollback of governments hostile to the U.S. took place in World War II (against Italy 1943, Germany 1945 and Japan 1945), Afghanistan (against the Taliban 2001) and Iraq (against Saddam Hussein 2003).

Taliban

Afghan Talibanthe TalibanTaleban
Rollback of governments hostile to the U.S. took place in World War II (against Italy 1943, Germany 1945 and Japan 1945), Afghanistan (against the Taliban 2001) and Iraq (against Saddam Hussein 2003).

2003 invasion of Iraq

invasion of IraqIraq War2003 Iraq War
Rollback of governments hostile to the U.S. took place in World War II (against Italy 1943, Germany 1945 and Japan 1945), Afghanistan (against the Taliban 2001) and Iraq (against Saddam Hussein 2003).

Saddam Hussein

SaddamSadam HusseinSadaam Hussein
Rollback of governments hostile to the U.S. took place in World War II (against Italy 1943, Germany 1945 and Japan 1945), Afghanistan (against the Taliban 2001) and Iraq (against Saddam Hussein 2003).

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
Some Britons, opposed to Russian oppression against Poland, proposed in 1835 a coalition that would be "united to roll back into its congenial steppes and deserts the tide of Russian barbarism."

John Buchan

John Buchan, 1st Baron TweedsmuirThe Lord TweedsmuirLord Tweedsmuir
Scottish novelist and military historian John Buchan in 1915 wrote of the American Indian Wars, "I cast back to my memory of the tales of Indian war, and could not believe but that the white man, if warned and armed, would rollback [sic] the Cherokees."

American Indian Wars

Indian WarsPlains Indian WarsIndian War
Scottish novelist and military historian John Buchan in 1915 wrote of the American Indian Wars, "I cast back to my memory of the tales of Indian war, and could not believe but that the white man, if warned and armed, would rollback [sic] the Cherokees."