Rolls-Royce Spey

SpeyRolls Royce Spey SM1CRolls Royce SpeySpey 1AWS-9RB.168-25R SpeyRolls-Royce RB183-2 "Spey" Mk555-15Allison TF-41model 506-14 SpeyRB.183 Mk 555 Spey
The Rolls-Royce Spey (company designations RB.163 and RB.168 and RB.183) is a low-bypass turbofan engine originally designed and manufactured by Rolls-Royce that has been in widespread service for over 40 years.wikipedia
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Rolls-Royce Marine Spey

Marine Spey
Intended for the civilian jet airliner market when it was being designed in the late 1950s, the Spey concept was also used in various military engines, and later as a turboshaft engine for ships known as the Marine Spey, and even as the basis for a new civilian line, the Rolls-Royce Tay.
The Rolls-Royce Marine Spey is a marine gas turbine based on the Rolls-Royce Spey and TF41 aircraft turbofan engines.

Rolls-Royce RB.183 Tay

Rolls-Royce TayTayR-R Tay
Intended for the civilian jet airliner market when it was being designed in the late 1950s, the Spey concept was also used in various military engines, and later as a turboshaft engine for ships known as the Marine Spey, and even as the basis for a new civilian line, the Rolls-Royce Tay.
The Rolls-Royce RB.183 Tay is a turbofan engine, developed from the RB.183 Mk 555 Spey core and using a fan scaled directly from the Rolls-Royce RB.211-535E4 to produce versions with a bypass ratio of 3.1:1 or greater.

Turbofan

high-bypass turbofanturbofan engineturbofans
The Rolls-Royce Spey (company designations RB.163 and RB.168 and RB.183) is a low-bypass turbofan engine originally designed and manufactured by Rolls-Royce that has been in widespread service for over 40 years.
Civilian turbofan engines of the 1960s, such as the Pratt & Whitney JT8D and the Rolls-Royce Spey, had bypass ratios closer to 1, and were similar to their military equivalents.

BAC One-Eleven

BAC 1-11BAC One-Eleven 500BAC-111
This was far too large for smaller aircraft such as the Sud Caravelle, BAC One-Eleven or Hawker Siddeley Trident which were then under design.
Market research showed the 59-seat BAC 107 was too small, and the design was reworked in 1961, with passenger capacity growing to 80 seats, and BS75s being discarded in favour of Rolls-Royce Speys.

Rolls-Royce Medway

MedwayRB.140/141 MedwayRolls Royce RB.140/RB.141 (Medway)
Rolls then started work on a smaller engine otherwise identical in design derived from the larger RB.140/141 Medway - which itself had been cancelled after British European Airways (BEA) had demanded the downsizing of the Trident, the RB.163, using the same two-spool turbine system and a fairly small fan delivering bypass ratios of about 0.64:1.
The project was cancelled due to changes in market requirements that also led to the development and production of the smaller but similar Rolls-Royce Spey, and the cancellation of the Armstrong Whitworth AW.681 military transport aircraft project.

Rolls-Royce Limited

Rolls-RoyceRolls RoyceRolls-Royce Ltd
The Rolls-Royce Spey (company designations RB.163 and RB.168 and RB.183) is a low-bypass turbofan engine originally designed and manufactured by Rolls-Royce that has been in widespread service for over 40 years.
Amongst the jet engines of this period was the RB163 Spey, which powers the Hawker Siddeley Trident, BAC One-Eleven, Grumman Gulfstream II and Fokker F28 Fellowship.

Blackburn Buccaneer

BuccaneerBuccaneersHawker Siddeley Buccaneer
The winning design was the Blackburn Buccaneer, which had an emphasis on low altitude performance (to evade enemy radar) as opposed to outright speed.
The initial production aircraft suffered a series of accidents due to insufficient engine power, which was quickly addressed in the Buccaneer S.2, equipped with more powerful Rolls-Royce Spey jet engines.

Hawker Siddeley Trident

TridentHawker Siddeley Trident 2EHawker Siddeley Trident 1C
This was far too large for smaller aircraft such as the Sud Caravelle, BAC One-Eleven or Hawker Siddeley Trident which were then under design.
Downsizing the Trident involved substantial changes to the design being made, including a powerplant change from the Medway to a scaled-down derivative, the 40 percent less powerful 9,850 lb f (43.8 kN) Rolls-Royce Spey 505.

British European Airways

BEABritish European Airways CorporationB.E.A.
Rolls then started work on a smaller engine otherwise identical in design derived from the larger RB.140/141 Medway - which itself had been cancelled after British European Airways (BEA) had demanded the downsizing of the Trident, the RB.163, using the same two-spool turbine system and a fairly small fan delivering bypass ratios of about 0.64:1.
Meeting BEA's specifications for the Trident involved reducing the length of the aircraft's fuselage, its wingspan and weight and replacing the Rolls-Royce RB141/3 "Medway" engines with Rolls-Royce RB163 "Speys".

McDonnell Douglas Phantom in UK service

McDonnell Douglas Phantom FGR.2McDonnell Douglas PhantomF-4 Phantom
The British versions of the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II (designated Phantom FG.Mk.1 and FGR.Mk.2) replaced the 16,000 lb wet thrust J79 turbojets with a pair of 20,515 lb wet thrust Spey 201 turbofans.
The most significant change was the substitution of the larger and more powerful Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan for the GE J79 turbojet to allow operations from the Royal Navy's carriers.

Allison TF41

TF41Allison TF41-A-1
A co-development version of the Spey between Rolls-Royce and Allison in the 1960s is the Allison TF41.
The TF41 was jointly developed by Allison Engine Company and Rolls-Royce from the latter's RB.168-25R Spey.

Grumman Gulfstream II

Gulfstream IIGrumman G-1159 Gulfstream IIC-11
The Gulfstream II is a twin-jet swept wing corporate transport powered by two Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines and designed to provide high speed and long range capability without sacrificing the airport performance, reliability, and other operational advantages of its predecessor, the turboprop Gulfstream I.

De Havilland Gyron Junior

Gyron JuniorBristol Siddeley Gyron Juniorde Havilland H.6 Gyron Junior
The early pre-production versions, powered by the de Havilland Gyron Junior, also proved to be dangerously underpowered.
The later Buccaneer S.2 used the more powerful Rolls-Royce Spey engine.

Gulfstream III

C-20Gulfstream C-20Grumman Gulfstream III
* Model G-1159A Gulfstream III - Two or three-crew executive, corporate transport aircraft, powered by two Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines.

Boeing 727

Boeing 727-200Boeing 727-100727-200
At that time Boeing intended to use three Allison AR963 turbofan engines, license-built versions of the Rolls-Royce RB163 Spey used by the Trident.

AMX International AMX

AMXAMX InternationalAermacchi MB-340
A fully updated version of the military RB.168 was also built to power the AMX International AMX attack aircraft.
Amongst the engines examined were the Turbo-Union RB199 (as used by the larger Panavia Tornado), the Rolls-Royce Turbomeca Adour, Rolls-Royce Viper, and the Rolls-Royce Spey engine.

Fokker F28 Fellowship

Fokker F28Fokker F-28Fokker F28-4000
A major revision was the F28-4000, which was powered by quieter Rolls-Royce Spey 555-15H engines, a redesigned cockpit, a modified wing, and had a further increased seating capacity of up to 85 passengers.

Hawker Siddeley Nimrod

NimrodHawker-Siddeley NimrodNimrod MR2
The Comet's turbojet engines were replaced by Rolls-Royce Spey turbofans for better fuel efficiency, particularly at the low altitudes required for maritime patrol.

ThrustSSC

Thrust SSCfirst broke the sound barrier on landMach 1.02 in 1997
It was powered by two afterburning Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines, as used in the British version of the F-4 Phantom II jet fighter.

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II

F-4 Phantom IIF-4 PhantomF-4
The British versions of the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II (designated Phantom FG.Mk.1 and FGR.Mk.2) replaced the 16,000 lb wet thrust J79 turbojets with a pair of 20,515 lb wet thrust Spey 201 turbofans.
The main differences were the use of the British Rolls-Royce Spey engines and of British-made avionics.

Pratt & Whitney TF30

TF30TF-30Pratt & Whitney/SNECMA TF106
Instead of producing the TF30 under license for P&W, the Allison Engine Company offered its own TF41 turbofan, a license-built version of the RB.168-25R Spey, to the Air Force.

Xi'an JH-7

Xian JH-7JH-7JH-7A
The program was also aiming to make use of newly imported British Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines at the time.