Roman Catholic Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg

GenevaBishop of Genevadiocese of GenevaDiocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourgbishopric of LausanneLausanne, Geneva and FribourgBishop of Lausanne and GenevaBishops of GenevaLausanne, Genève et FribourgPrince-Bishopric
The Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg (Dioecesis Lausannensis, Genevensis et Friburgensis) is a Latin Roman Catholic diocese in Switzerland, which is (as all sees in the Alpine country) exempt (i.e. immediately subject to the Holy See, not part of any ecclesiastical province).wikipedia
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Canton of Geneva

GenevaGenevanRepublic of Geneva
It comprises the Cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel, with the exception of certain parishes of the right bank of the Rhône belonging to the Diocese of Sion (Sitten).
The Prince-Bishopric of Geneva was a Prince-Bishopric of the Holy Roman Empire from 1154, but from 1290, secular authority over the citizens was divided from the bishop's authority, at first only lower jurisdiction, the office of vidame given to François de Candie in 1314, but from 1387 the bishops granted the citizens of Geneva full communal self-government.

Charles Morerod

The current bishop is Charles Morerod, O.P., who was ordained and installed on 11 December 2011.
Since 2011, he has been bishop of Lausanne, Genève et Fribourg.

Fribourg

FreiburgFribourg, SwitzerlandCity of Fribourg
Until 1924, it was called the Diocese of Lausanne and Geneva. The diocese has its seat at Fribourg; it has 680,000 Catholics, constituting 51% of the population of its district (as of 2004).
Today it is the seat of the Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Geneva

bishop of GenevaGenevaGenève
Despite the name, it has no direct link with the former Roman Catholic Diocese of Geneva (400-1801), which was merged into the then Diocese of Chambéry, which was promoted a Metropolitan see but lost former Genevan territory to the bishopric of Lausanne in 1819.
Roman Catholic Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg, which indirectly inherited its territory and adopted its title without direct link

Prince-bishop

prince-bishopricPrince-Archbishopbishopric
It was created by the merger in 1821 of the Diocese of Lausanne and the Diocese of Geneva, both prince-bishoprics until they were secularized during the Reformation.

Gaspard Mermillod

Bishop Gaspard MermillodBishop Gaspard Mermillod of GenevaCardinal Mermillod
In 1864, Pope Pius IX appointed the vicar general of Geneva, Gaspard Mermillod, as an auxiliary bishop.
He served as Bishop of Lausanne and Geneva from 1883 to 1891, having previously served as Titular Bishop of Hebron.

Savoy

SavoiaSavoyardSavoie
The guardians of the ecclesiastical property (advocati, avoués) of the see were originally the counts of Genevois, then the lords of Gerenstein, the dukes of Zähringen, the counts of Kyburg, lastly the counts (later dukes) of Savoy.
It acquired the County of Nice in 1388, and in 1401 added the County of Geneva, the area of Geneva except for the city proper, which was ruled by its prince-bishop, nominally under the duke's rule: the bishops of Geneva, by unspoken agreement, came from the House of Savoy; this agreement came to an end in 1533.

Geneva

Geneva, SwitzerlandGenèveGinevra
His vicar general resides at Geneva, and is always parish priest of that city.
Geneva forms part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg.

Fribourg Cathedral

Cathedral of St. NicholasCathedral of Saint Nicholas
Originally a parish church, in 1945 it became the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg.

Diocese

bishopricarchdiocesediocesan
The Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg (Dioecesis Lausannensis, Genevensis et Friburgensis) is a Latin Roman Catholic diocese in Switzerland, which is (as all sees in the Alpine country) exempt (i.e. immediately subject to the Holy See, not part of any ecclesiastical province).

Holy See

VaticanRomethe Vatican
The Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg (Dioecesis Lausannensis, Genevensis et Friburgensis) is a Latin Roman Catholic diocese in Switzerland, which is (as all sees in the Alpine country) exempt (i.e. immediately subject to the Holy See, not part of any ecclesiastical province).

Ecclesiastical province

Provinceprovincesprovincial
The Diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg (Dioecesis Lausannensis, Genevensis et Friburgensis) is a Latin Roman Catholic diocese in Switzerland, which is (as all sees in the Alpine country) exempt (i.e. immediately subject to the Holy See, not part of any ecclesiastical province).

Canton of Fribourg

FribourgFRFreiburg
It comprises the Cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel, with the exception of certain parishes of the right bank of the Rhône belonging to the Diocese of Sion (Sitten).

Canton of Vaud

VaudVDCanton de Vaud
It comprises the Cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel, with the exception of certain parishes of the right bank of the Rhône belonging to the Diocese of Sion (Sitten).

Canton of Neuchâtel

NeuchâtelNENeuchatel
It comprises the Cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel, with the exception of certain parishes of the right bank of the Rhône belonging to the Diocese of Sion (Sitten).

Rhône

RhoneRhone valleyRhône Valley
It comprises the Cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel, with the exception of certain parishes of the right bank of the Rhône belonging to the Diocese of Sion (Sitten).

Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion

Bishop of SionSionDiocese of Sion
It comprises the Cantons of Fribourg, Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel, with the exception of certain parishes of the right bank of the Rhône belonging to the Diocese of Sion (Sitten).
Prince-Bishopric of Lausanne

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chambéry–Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne–Tarentaise

Archdiocese of Chambérydiocese of ChambéryArchdiocese of Chambéry, Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, and Tarentaise
Despite the name, it has no direct link with the former Roman Catholic Diocese of Geneva (400-1801), which was merged into the then Diocese of Chambéry, which was promoted a Metropolitan see but lost former Genevan territory to the bishopric of Lausanne in 1819.

Windisch

Brugg/Windisch
The origin of the See of Lausanne can be traced to the ancient See of Windisch (Vindonissa).

Council of Epaone

councilCouncils of Epaone
Bubulcus, the first Bishop of Windisch, appeared at the imperial Synod of Epaone for th Arelatian Kingdom of Burgundy in 517.

Clermont-Ferrand

ClermontClermont-Ferrand International Short Film FestivalClermont Ferrand
The second and last known Bishop of Windisch was Gramatius (Grammatius), who signed the decrees of the Synods of Clermont in 535, of Orléans, 541, and that of Orléans in 549.

Orléans

OrleansAurelianumOrleans, France
The second and last known Bishop of Windisch was Gramatius (Grammatius), who signed the decrees of the Synods of Clermont in 535, of Orléans, 541, and that of Orléans in 549.

Konstanz

ConstanceBishop of ConstanzBishopric of Constance
It was generally believed that shortly after this the see was transferred from Windisch to Konstanz, until investigations, particularly by Marius Besson, made it probable that, between 549 and 585, the see was divided and the real seat of the bishops of Windisch transferred to Avenches (Aventicum), while the eastern part of the diocese was united with the Diocese of Konstanz.

Avenches

Switzerland
It was generally believed that shortly after this the see was transferred from Windisch to Konstanz, until investigations, particularly by Marius Besson, made it probable that, between 549 and 585, the see was divided and the real seat of the bishops of Windisch transferred to Avenches (Aventicum), while the eastern part of the diocese was united with the Diocese of Konstanz.