Ronnie Scott

Ronnie ScottsRonnie Scott's Jazz Clubfamous jazz musicianRonald ScottRonnie Scott and the BandRonnie Scott QuintetRonnie Scott TrioRonnie Scott’sScott
Ronnie Scott OBE (born Ronald Schatt, 28 January 1927 – 23 December 1996) was an English jazz tenor saxophonist and jazz club owner.wikipedia
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Victor Feldman

FeldmanVic FeldmanVictor S. Feldman
In 1952, Scott joined Jack Parnell's orchestra and from 1953 to 1956 led a nine-piece band and quintet which included Pete King, with whom he later opened his jazz club, Victor Feldman, Hank Shaw, and Phil Seamen.
There were further overseas trips with Ronnie Scott (to Paris in 1952), and Harry Parry (to India).

Tubby Hayes

Hayes, Tubby
He co-led The Jazz Couriers with Tubby Hayes from 1957 to 1959 and was leader of a quartet that included Stan Tracey (1960–67).
Edward Brian "Tubby" Hayes (30 January 1935 – 8 June 1973) was an English jazz multi-instrumentalist, best known for his tenor saxophone playing in groups with fellow sax player Ronnie Scott and with trumpeter Jimmy Deuchar.

Phil Seamen

In 1952, Scott joined Jack Parnell's orchestra and from 1953 to 1956 led a nine-piece band and quintet which included Pete King, with whom he later opened his jazz club, Victor Feldman, Hank Shaw, and Phil Seamen.
Notable examples included Joe Harriott, Tubby Hayes, Stan Tracey, Ronnie Scott, Dick Morrissey, Harold McNair, Don Rendell, Victor Feldman, Dizzy Reece, Tony Coe, Tony Lee, and George Chisholm, among others.

Tito Burns

He worked with Ambrose, Cab Kaye, and Tito Burns.
The group is believed, partly on the account of musician Ronnie Scott, to have been the first band to perform the new jazz idiom bebop on BBC Radio in 1947.

Kenny Wheeler

Kenny Wheeler QuintetOne of Many'' (Kenny Wheeler album)
Simultaneously he ran his octet, which included John Surman and Kenny Wheeler, and a trio with Mike Carr on keyboards and Bobby Gien on drums (1971–1975).
He found his way into the London jazz scene of the time, playing in groups led by Tommy Whittle, Tubby Hayes, and Ronnie Scott.

Martin Drew

Scott's other bands often included John Critchinson on keyboards and Martin Drew on drums.
Martin Drew (11 February 1944 – 29 July 2010) was an English jazz drummer who played with Ronnie Scott between 1975 and 1995 and with Oscar Peterson between 1974 and 2007.

John Critchinson

Scott's other bands often included John Critchinson on keyboards and Martin Drew on drums.
He worked as a part-time musician with Ronnie Scott, Tubby Hayes, and Jimmy Deuchar, among others.

Pete King (saxophonist)

Pete KingPeter KingPete King
In 1952, Scott joined Jack Parnell's orchestra and from 1953 to 1956 led a nine-piece band and quintet which included Pete King, with whom he later opened his jazz club, Victor Feldman, Hank Shaw, and Phil Seamen. Scott is perhaps best remembered for co-founding, with former tenor sax player Pete King, Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club, which opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district, with the debut of a young alto sax player named Peter King (no relation), before later moving to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street in 1965.
In September 1952 he recorded with the Ronnie Scott Quintet, which also included Dill Jones, Lennie Bush, and Tony Crombie.

John Surman

John Surman's Rainbow Band
Simultaneously he ran his octet, which included John Surman and Kenny Wheeler, and a trio with Mike Carr on keyboards and Bobby Gien on drums (1971–1975).
During this early period he also recorded with (among others) saxophonist Ronnie Scott, guitarist John McLaughlin, bandleader Michael Gibbs, trombonist Albert Mangelsdorff, and pianist Chris McGregor's Brotherhood of Breath.

Stan Tracey

Stan Tracey Big BandStan Tracey QuartetStanley William Tracey
He co-led The Jazz Couriers with Tubby Hayes from 1957 to 1959 and was leader of a quartet that included Stan Tracey (1960–67).
In February 1957, he toured the United States with Ronnie Scott's group, and became the pianist with Ted Heath's Orchestra in September for two years (1958–59), including a US tour with singer Carmen McRae.

I Missed Again

He did occasional session work, which included performing the solo on "Lady Madonna", the 1968 single by the Beatles, playing on Roy Budd's score for the film Fear Is the Key (1972), and performing the tenor sax solo on "I Missed Again", the 1981 single by Phil Collins.
The song features a tenor sax solo from British jazz musician Ronnie Scott.

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club

Ronnie ScottRonnie Scott's ClubRonnie Scott’s
Scott is perhaps best remembered for co-founding, with former tenor sax player Pete King, Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club, which opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district, with the debut of a young alto sax player named Peter King (no relation), before later moving to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street in 1965.
It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King.

Ted Heath (bandleader)

Ted HeathTed Heath and His MusicTed Heath Orchestra
He toured with trumpeter Johnny Claes from 1944 to 1945 and with Ted Heath in 1946.
His band members included Ronnie Scott, an early member of the band, the pianist Stan Tracey, trumpeters Kenny Baker, Eddie Blair, Duncan Campbell, sax players Don Rendell and Tommy Whittle, trombonists Don Lusher and Wally Smith, drummers Jack Parnell and Ronnie Verrell and double bass Johnny Hawksworth.

Hank Shaw

In 1952, Scott joined Jack Parnell's orchestra and from 1953 to 1956 led a nine-piece band and quintet which included Pete King, with whom he later opened his jazz club, Victor Feldman, Hank Shaw, and Phil Seamen.
He was one of the early Club Eleven players, along with Ronnie Scott, John Dankworth, Lennie Bush, and others; he also played with many of these musicians on the recordings of Alan Dean's Beboppers.

Peter King (saxophonist)

Peter KingPete King
Scott is perhaps best remembered for co-founding, with former tenor sax player Pete King, Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club, which opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district, with the debut of a young alto sax player named Peter King (no relation), before later moving to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street in 1965.
In 1959, at the age of 19, he was booked by Ronnie Scott to perform at the opening of Scott's club in Gerrard Street, London.

Lady Madonna

Madonna
He did occasional session work, which included performing the solo on "Lady Madonna", the 1968 single by the Beatles, playing on Roy Budd's score for the film Fear Is the Key (1972), and performing the tenor sax solo on "I Missed Again", the 1981 single by Phil Collins.
The tenor saxophone solo on the track was played by British jazz musician and club owner Ronnie Scott.

Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band

The Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big BandClarke-Boland Big BandKenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big Band
From 1967–69, Scott was a member of the Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band, which toured Europe and included Johnny Griffin and Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis.

Central Foundation Boys' School

Central Foundation SchoolCentral FoundationCentral Foundation Boys School
Scott attended the Central Foundation Boys' School.

Derek Humble

He worked with Ronnie Scott from 1953 until 1956 and recorded with Tony Crombie, Victor Feldman, Arnold Ross, Kenny Graham, and Jimmy Deuchar in the 1950s.

The Flamingo Club

Flamingo ClubThe FlamingoFlamingo
In April 1957, the club moved to new premises in the basement of a former grocery store at 33–37 Wardour Street, where it initially remained primarily a jazz venue with Ronnie Scott and Tubby Hayes as members of the resident band.

Benny Green (saxophonist)

Benny GreenGreen, BennyBenny Green
As a saxophonist, he worked in the bands of Ralph Sharon (1952), Ronnie Scott (1952), Stan Kenton (February 1956) and Dizzy Reece (1957).

The Jazz Couriers

Jazz Couriers
The quintet's first line-up consisted of Tubby Hayes and Ronnie Scott on tenor saxophones, with Terry Shannon (piano), Malcolm Cecil (bass) and Bill Eyden (drums) and made their debut on the opening night at the new Flamingo Club in Wardour Street, Soho.

Malcolm Cecil

Born in London, Cecil was a founding member of the UK's leading jazz quintet of the late 1950s, The Jazz Couriers, before going on to join a number of British jazz combos led by Dick Morrissey, Tony Crombie and Ronnie Scott in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Lennie Bush

He was one of the founding members of London's Club Eleven and played there in a band with Ronnie Scott, Hank Shaw, Tommy Pollard, and Tony Crombie.

Bill Eyden

In 1955 Eyden met Tubby Hayes with whom he would play regularly for the next two decades, joining Hayes and Ronnie Scott in The Jazz Couriers.