A report on Roof lantern

The lantern over the dome of the Florence Baptistery, dated to 1150
A cupola-shaped lantern on 16th-century Seville Cathedral, Andalusia, Spain
The 6th-century Hagia Sophia's upper dome acts as a roof lantern

Daylighting architectural element.

- Roof lantern
The lantern over the dome of the Florence Baptistery, dated to 1150

4 related topics with Alpha

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A skylight providing internal illumination

Daylighting

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Practice of placing windows, skylights, other openings, and reflective surfaces so that sunlight can provide effective internal lighting.

Practice of placing windows, skylights, other openings, and reflective surfaces so that sunlight can provide effective internal lighting.

A skylight providing internal illumination
Modern skylight
Skylights above laylights at the Lyme Art Association Gallery
Glass brick wall, outdoors
Glass brick wall, indoors
Bottle wall
Daylight redirecting film bending light upwards

An alternative to a skylight is a roof lantern.

Orangery in Kuskovo, Moscow (1760s).

Orangery

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Room or a dedicated building on the grounds of fashionable residences of Northern Europe from the 17th to the 19th centuries where orange and other fruit trees were protected during the winter, as a very large form of greenhouse or conservatory.

Room or a dedicated building on the grounds of fashionable residences of Northern Europe from the 17th to the 19th centuries where orange and other fruit trees were protected during the winter, as a very large form of greenhouse or conservatory.

Orangery in Kuskovo, Moscow (1760s).
Glazed roof at Fota House Orangery, Fota Island, Ireland
The Orangerieschloss built by Frederick William IV of Prussia in Potsdam in the mid-19th century.
The orangerie of the Royal Castle of Laeken, Belgium (ca.1820), is the oldest part of the monumental Royal Greenhouses of Laeken.
Versailles Orangerie built between 1684 and 1686.
Roof lantern at Meuselwitz Orangery, Meuselwitz, Germany
Orangery at Wrest Park
Belvedere Orangery, Vienna, Austria
Orangery at Château de Bagatelle
Schwerin Castle Orangery, Schwerin, Germany
Grand Orangery (Peterhof)
Orangerie at Finspång Castle, Sweden (1832)
Wye Plantation Orangery photographed in 1937.
The reconstructed Mount Vernon Orangery designed by George Washington.
The Orangery at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, now used as a restaurant.
The "Temple Greenhouse" of Croome Court, 1761, now a cafe
Ham House, kitchen garden with the orangery at the end (inevitably, now a cafe)
Kensington Palace Orangery.
The orangery and mushroom house at Hanbury Hall
Orangery and maze at Longleat
Hampton Court orangery
Orangery, Belton House

Domestic orangeries also typically feature a roof lantern.

Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. This small temple marks the place where St Peter was put to death

Renaissance architecture

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European architecture of the period between the early 15th and early 16th centuries in different regions, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture.

European architecture of the period between the early 15th and early 16th centuries in different regions, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture.

Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. This small temple marks the place where St Peter was put to death
Temple of Vesta, Rome, 205 AD. As one of the most important temples of Ancient Rome, it became the model for Bramante's Tempietto
Palladio's engraving of Bramante's Tempietto
Plan of Bramante's Tempietto in Montorio
The Piazza del Campidoglio
The Romanesque Florence Baptistery was the object of Brunelleschi's studies of perspective
Pope Sixtus IV, 1477, builder of the Sistine Chapel. Fresco by Melozzo da Forlì in the Vatican Palace.
Four Humanist philosophers under the patronage of the Medici: Marsilio Ficino, Cristoforo Landino, Angelo Poliziano and Demetrius Chalcondyles. Fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio.
Cosimo de' Medici the Elder, head of the Medici Bank, sponsored civic building programs. Posthumous portrait by Pontormo.
The Church of the Certosa di Pavia, Lombardy
Scuola Grande di San Marco, Venice
Raphael's unused plan for St. Peter's Basilica
Facade of Sant'Agostino, Rome, built in 1483 by Giacomo di Pietrasanta
Classical Orders, engraving from the Encyclopédie vol. 18. 18th century.
The Dome of St Peter's Basilica, Rome.
Courtyard of Palazzo Strozzi, Florence
Ospedale degli Innocenti in Florence.
The dome of Florence Cathedral (the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore)
The church of San Lorenzo
Palazzo Medici Riccardi by Michelozzo. Florence, 1444
Basilica of Sant'Andrea, Mantua, the façade
Façade of Santa Maria Novella, 1456–70
The crossing of Santa Maria della Grazie, Milan (1490)
picture above
The Palazzo Farnese, Rome (1534–1545). Designed by Sangallo and Michelangelo.
Palazzo Pandolfini, Florence, by Raphael
Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne.
Palazzo Te, Mantua
St Peter's Basilica
The vestibule of the Laurentian Library
Il Gesù, designed by Giacomo della Porta.
Villa Capra "La Rotonda"
Keystone with a profile of a man, Palazzo Giusti, Verona, Italy
The House of the Blackheads in Riga, Latvia
Royal Summer Palace in Prague is considered the purest Renaissance architecture outside of Italy.
Cathedral of St James, Šibenik
English Renaissance: Hardwick Hall (1590–1597).
French Renaissance: Château de Chambord (1519–39)
Juleum in Helmstedt, Germany (example of Weser Renaissance)
Antwerp City Hall (finished in 1564)
Courtyard of Wawel Castle exemplifies first period of Polish Renaissance
Cloister of the Convent of Christ, Tomar, Portugal, (1557–1591), Diogo de Torralva and Filippo Terzi.
The Palace of Facets on the Cathedral Square of the Moscow Kremlin.
Nordic Renaissance: Frederiksborg Palace (1602–20)
The Escorial (1563–1584), Madrid
Cathedral Basilica of Salvador built between 1657 and 1746, a UNESCO WHS.
The large Basilica of San Francisco in Quito, built between 1535 and 1650, a UNESCO World Heritage Site city.

Michelangelo’s dome was a masterpiece of design using two masonry shells, one within the other and crowned by a massive roof lantern supported, as at Florence, on ribs.

White marble cupolas cap minarets at the Tomb of Jahangir in Lahore, Pakistan

Cupola

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Relatively small, most often dome-like, tall structure on top of a building.

Relatively small, most often dome-like, tall structure on top of a building.

White marble cupolas cap minarets at the Tomb of Jahangir in Lahore, Pakistan
Cupolas on the towers of Montefiascone Cathedral, Italy.
Interior of cupola ceiling in the old Synagogue of Győr, Hungary.
Ribbed cupola crowns the minaret of the Mosque of Uqba, in Kairouan, Tunisia.
Inside of Armenian Orthodox church cupola in Lviv, Ukraine.
Cupolas were also used on some old barns for ventilation.
View from the interior of the Cupola module on the International Space Station.
Trompe-l'œil painting of a cupola in a church in Northern Italy (Brivio)
A cupola-style caboose with an "angel seat" above
The dome of Santa Maria del Fiore Cathedral, also known as the Duomo, in Florence, Italy, which includes a cupola.

Cupolas often serve as a belfry, belvedere, or roof lantern above a main roof.