Rope

cordagecordropemakerlineFiber roperope-makinglinesRopesstringcable
A rope is a group of yarns, plies, fibers or strands that are twisted or braided together into a larger and stronger form.wikipedia
735 Related Articles

Braid

braidsbraidingplaited
A rope is a group of yarns, plies, fibers or strands that are twisted or braided together into a larger and stronger form.
The braiding technique was used to make ropes with both natural and synthetic fibers as well as coaxial cables for radios using copper wire.

Yarn

threadcotton yarnyarns
A rope is a group of yarns, plies, fibers or strands that are twisted or braided together into a larger and stronger form.
Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery, or ropemaking.

String (structure)

stringstrings[string
Rope is thicker and stronger than similarly constructed cord, string, and twine.
String was used in prehistoric times to make fire, as part of a drilling tool called the bow drill, which makes fire by friction, as well as fishing lines, nets, clothing, shelter making materials, bow string, sutures, traps, cordage, and countless other uses.

Sisal

Agave sisalanaA. sisalanaCactus Sisal
Common natural fibres for rope are manila hemp, hemp, linen, cotton, coir, jute, straw, and sisal.
The sisal fibre is traditionally used for rope and twine, and has many other uses, including paper, cloth, footwear, hats, bags, carpets, and dartboards.

Coir

coconut fibreCoco peatcoconut coir
Common natural fibres for rope are manila hemp, hemp, linen, cotton, coir, jute, straw, and sisal.
Ropes and cordage have been made from coconut fibre since ancient times.

Twine

stringbinder twineat Ki
Rope is thicker and stronger than similarly constructed cord, string, and twine.
More generally, the term can be applied to a cord.

Wire rope

cablecablessteel cable
Wire rope is made of steel or other metal alloys.
Wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix forming a composite "rope", in a pattern known as "laid rope".

Synthetic fiber

syntheticsynthetic fibresynthetic fibers
Rope may be constructed of any long, stringy, fibrous material, but generally is constructed of certain natural or synthetic fibres.
Its novel use as a material for women's stockings overshadowed more practical uses, such as a replacement for the silk in parachutes and other military uses like ropes.

Winch

winchestowing winchTirfor
Winches and capstans are machines designed to pull ropes.
A winch is a mechanical device that is used to pull in (wind up) or let out (wind out) or otherwise adjust the tension of a rope or wire rope (also called "cable" or "wire cable").

Dynamic rope

ropesdynamicdynamic" rope
The modern sport of rock climbing uses so-called "dynamic" rope, which stretches under load in an elastic manner to absorb the energy required to arrest a person in free fall without generating forces high enough to injure them.
A dynamic rope is a specially constructed, somewhat elastic rope used primarily in rock climbing, ice climbing, and mountaineering.

Vectran

Synthetic fibres in use for rope-making include polypropylene, nylon, polyesters (e.g. PET, LCP, Vectran), polyethylene (e.g. Dyneema and Spectra), Aramids (e.g. Twaron, Technora and Kevlar) and acrylics (e.g. Dralon).
Vectran fibers are used as reinforcing (matrix) fibers for ropes, electrical cables, sailcloth, and advanced composite materials, professional bike tires, and in electronics applications.

Pulley

pulleyspulley wheelBlock and tackle
Pulleys redirect the pulling force to another direction, and can create mechanical advantage so that multiple strands of rope share a load and multiply the force applied to the end.
The drive element of a pulley system can be a rope, cable, belt, or chain.

Static rope

railing ropestaticStatic" ropes
"Static" ropes, used for example in caving, rappelling, and rescue applications, are designed for minimal stretch; they are not designed to arrest free falls.
A static rope is a rope that is not designed to stretch when placed under load, in contrast to a dynamic rope.

Knot

knotsworking endknotwork
To fasten rope, many types of knots have been invented for countless uses.
Determining a precise value for a particular knot is difficult because many factors can affect a knot efficiency test: the type of fiber, the style of rope, the size of rope, whether it is wet or dry, how the knot is dressed before loading, how rapidly it is loaded, whether the knot is repeatedly loaded, and so on.

Jute

jute and jutejute bagsJute cultivation
Common natural fibres for rope are manila hemp, hemp, linen, cotton, coir, jute, straw, and sisal.
The fibers are used alone or blended with other types of fiber to make twine and rope.

Ropewalk

rope walkropeyardropery
From the Middle Ages until the 18th century, in Europe ropes were constructed in ropewalks, very long buildings where strands the full length of the rope were spread out and then laid up or twisted together to form the rope.
Ropery redirects here and may also refer to a place where ropes are made

Coiling

butterfly coilCoil knotOver/under cable coiling
The butterfly coil is a method of carrying a rope used by climbers where the rope remains attached to the climber and ready to be uncoiled at short notice.
A coiling or coil is a curve, helix, or spiral used for storing rope or cable in compact and reliable yet easily attainable form.

Abseiling

rappellingrappelabseil
Double ropes are usually reserved for ice and mixed climbing, where there is need for two ropes to rappel or abseil.

Papyrus

papyripapyriformchartatabidum
Other rope in antiquity was made from the fibres of date palms, flax, grass, papyrus, leather, or animal hair.
Apart from a writing material, ancient Egyptians employed papyrus in the construction of other artifacts, such as reed boats, mats, rope, sandals, and baskets.

Rope splicing

splicingsplicedsplice
These long ropes were necessary in shipping as short ropes would require splicing to make them long enough to use for sheets and halyards.
Rope splicing in ropework is the forming of a semi-permanent joint between two ropes or two parts of the same rope by partly untwisting and then interweaving their strands.

Technora

Synthetic fibres in use for rope-making include polypropylene, nylon, polyesters (e.g. PET, LCP, Vectran), polyethylene (e.g. Dyneema and Spectra), Aramids (e.g. Twaron, Technora and Kevlar) and acrylics (e.g. Dralon).

Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

DyneemaUHMWPESpectra
Synthetic fibres in use for rope-making include polypropylene, nylon, polyesters (e.g. PET, LCP, Vectran), polyethylene (e.g. Dyneema and Spectra), Aramids (e.g. Twaron, Technora and Kevlar) and acrylics (e.g. Dralon).
Ships' hawsers and cables made from the fiber (0.97 specific gravity) float on sea water.

Nylon

Bri-Nylonnylon 6,6Nylons
Synthetic fibres in use for rope-making include polypropylene, nylon, polyesters (e.g. PET, LCP, Vectran), polyethylene (e.g. Dyneema and Spectra), Aramids (e.g. Twaron, Technora and Kevlar) and acrylics (e.g. Dralon).
It was also used to make tires, tents, ropes, ponchos, and other military supplies.

Hemp

industrial hemphemp seedhemp rope
Common natural fibres for rope are manila hemp, hemp, linen, cotton, coir, jute, straw, and sisal.

Aramid

aramid fiberAramidepara-aramid
Synthetic fibres in use for rope-making include polypropylene, nylon, polyesters (e.g. PET, LCP, Vectran), polyethylene (e.g. Dyneema and Spectra), Aramids (e.g. Twaron, Technora and Kevlar) and acrylics (e.g. Dralon).