Rotenone

rotenoidrotenolone
Rotenone is an odorless, colorless, crystalline isoflavone used as a broad-spectrum insecticide, piscicide, and pesticide.wikipedia
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Rotenoid

rotenoids
It was the first described member of the family of chemical compounds known as rotenoids.
Many have insecticidal activity, such as the prototypical member of the family, rotenone.

Insecticide

insecticidesinsecticidalsystemic
Rotenone is an odorless, colorless, crystalline isoflavone used as a broad-spectrum insecticide, piscicide, and pesticide.
Four extracts of plants are in commercial use: pyrethrum, rotenone, neem oil, and various essential oils

Pesticide

pesticidescrop sprayingchemical pesticides
Rotenone is an odorless, colorless, crystalline isoflavone used as a broad-spectrum insecticide, piscicide, and pesticide.
These include the pyrethroids, rotenoids, nicotinoids, and a fourth group that includes strychnine and scilliroside.

Organic farming

organicorganic agricultureorganic farm
Rotenone has been used as an organic pesticide dust for gardens.
For instance, naturally occurring pesticides such as pyrethrin and rotenone are permitted, while synthetic fertilizers and pesticides are generally prohibited.

Derris elliptica

D. elliptica
In 1902 Japanese chemist Nagai Nagayoshi isolated a pure crystalline compound from Derris elliptica which he called rotenone, after the Japanese name of the plant, roten. It is commercialized as cubé, tuba, or derris, in single preparation or in synergistic combination with other insecticides.
The roots of D. elliptica contain rotenone, a strong insecticide and fish poison.

Piscicide

piscicidalfishpoisoning fish
Rotenone is an odorless, colorless, crystalline isoflavone used as a broad-spectrum insecticide, piscicide, and pesticide.
Examples of piscicides include rotenone, saponins, TFM, niclosamide and Antimycin A (Fintrol).

Tephrosia

Tephrosia inandensis
Several species of Millettia and Tephrosia in South-east Asian regions
Many species in the genus are poisonous, particularly to fish, for their high concentration of rotenone.

Derris

Rotenone is produced by extraction from the roots and stems of several tropical and subtropical plant species, especially those belonging to the genera Lonchocarpus and Derris.
The roots of D. elliptica contain rotenone, a strong insecticide and fish poison.

Lonchocarpus

lancepodbalché-treeLonchocarpus costericensi
Rotenone is produced by extraction from the roots and stems of several tropical and subtropical plant species, especially those belonging to the genera Lonchocarpus and Derris.
Cubé resin' is produced from the roots of L. urucu and namely 'L. utilis (cubé). It contains enough of the toxic rotenoids rotenone and deguelin to be used as an insecticide and piscicide.

Mitochondrion

mitochondriamitochondrialmitochondrial membrane
Rotenone works by interfering with the electron transport chain in mitochondria.
These enzymes include monoamine oxidase, rotenone-insensitive NADH-cytochrome c-reductase, kynurenine hydroxylase and fatty acid Co-A ligase.

Deguelia utilis

cubéL. utilis
It is commercialized as cubé, tuba, or derris, in single preparation or in synergistic combination with other insecticides.
The major active ingredients are rotenone and deguelin.

Lonchocarpus urucu

L. urucu
Barbasco (Lonchocarpus urucu) – South America
The major active ingredients are rotenone and deguelin.

Pachyrhizus erosus

jicamajícamaSingkamas
It occurs naturally in the seeds and stems of several plants, such as the jicama vine plant, and the roots of several members of Fabaceae.
In contrast to the root, the remainder of the jícama plant is very poisonous; the seeds contain the toxin rotenone, which is used to poison insects and fish.

Fabaceae

legume familylegumepea family
It occurs naturally in the seeds and stems of several plants, such as the jicama vine plant, and the roots of several members of Fabaceae.
Industrial farmed legumes include Indigofera, cultivated for the production of indigo, Acacia, for gum arabic, and Derris, for the insecticide action of rotenone, a compound it produces.

Electron transport chain

electron transportrespiratory chainmitochondrial respiratory chain
Rotenone works by interfering with the electron transport chain in mitochondria.
This complex is inhibited by Alkylguanides (Example : Guanethidine), Rotenone, Barbiturates, Chlorpromazine, Piericidin.

Respiratory complex I

complex Imitochondrial complex Inadh dehydrogenase
It inhibits the transfer of electrons from iron-sulfur centers in complex I to ubiquinone.
The best-known inhibitor of complex I is rotenone (commonly used as an organic pesticide).

Piscidia piscipula

Florida fishpoison tree (Piscidia piscipula) – southern Florida, Caribbean
A number of chemicals present in the tree's tissues are toxic to fish, the principal one being the well-known rotenone.

Emmanuel Geoffroy

The active chemical component was first isolated in 1895 by a French botanist, Emmanuel Geoffroy, who called it nicouline, from a specimen of Robinia nicou, now called Lonchocarpus nicou, while traveling in French Guiana.
In a fact to be discovered posthumously, Geoffroy unknowingly discovered rotenone, which he originally named nicouline.

Nagai Nagayoshi

Nagayoshi Nagai
In 1902 Japanese chemist Nagai Nagayoshi isolated a pure crystalline compound from Derris elliptica which he called rotenone, after the Japanese name of the plant, roten.
Isolation of rotenone from Derris elliptica in 1902.

Stormy Lake (Alaska)

Stormy Lake
In 2012 rotenone was used to kill all remaining fish in Stormy Lake (Alaska) due to invasive pike destroying native species, which were re-introduced once the treatment was concluded.
In 2012 the lake was closed to the public and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game introduced rotenone, a piscicide, to eliminate highly aggressive northern pike that had apparently been illegally introduced to the lake and were decimating the native fish population.

Panguitch Lake

Beginning May 1, 2006, Panguitch Lake was treated with rotenone, to potentially eradicate and control the invasive population of Utah chub, which were probably introduced accidentally by anglers who used them as live bait.
Panguitch Lake was treated with rotenone beginning May 1, 2006 to potentially eradicate and control the invasive population of Utah chub, which were probably introduced accidentally by anglers who used them as live bait.

Verbascum thapsus

common mulleinVerbascummullein
Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus L.) according to Peterson Field Guides to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America Second Edition, p.130-131.
The plant's leaves, in addition to the seeds, have been reported to contain rotenone, although quantities are unknown.

Parkinson's disease

ParkinsonParkinson diseaseParkinson’s disease
In 2000, injecting rotenone into rats was reported to cause the development of symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's disease (PD).
Other predominant toxin-based models employ the insecticide rotenone, the herbicide paraquat and the fungicide maneb.

Mann Lake

Rotenone was implemented in 2010 to kill an invasive goldfish population present in Mann Lake, with the intention of not disrupting the lake's trout population.
In 2010, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife treated the lake with rotenone, a piscicide, killing around 200,000 goldfish and fathead minnows while sparing nearly all the trout.

MPTP

mptp poisoningMPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine)MPP+/MPTP
The neurotoxin MPTP had been known earlier to cause PD-like symptoms (in humans and other primates, though not in rats) by interfering with complex I in the electron transport chain and killing dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra.
It was shown that the pesticide and insecticide rotenone causes Parkinsonism in rats by killing dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra.