Routing protocol

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

A routing protocol specifies how routers communicate with each other to distribute information that enables them to select routes between nodes on a computer network.

- Routing protocol
Routing protocol classification computer networks.

19 related topics

Alpha

Network Packet

Computer network

Set of computers sharing resources located on or provided by network nodes.

Set of computers sharing resources located on or provided by network nodes.

Network Packet
Common network topologies
A sample overlay network
Network links
Fiber optic cables are used to transmit light from one computer/network node to another
2007 map showing submarine optical fiber telecommunication cables around the world.
Computers are very often connected to networks using wireless links
An ATM network interface in the form of an accessory card. A lot of network interfaces are built-in.
A typical home or small office router showing the ADSL telephone line and Ethernet network cable connections
Firewalls
The TCP/IP model and its relation to common protocols used at different layers of the model.
Message flows between two devices (A-B) at the four layers of the TCP/IP model in the presence of a router (R). Red flows are effective communication paths, black paths are across the actual network links.
SONET & SDH
Asynchronous Transfer Mode
Routing calculates good paths through a network for information to take. For example, from node 1 to node 6 the best routes are likely to be 1-8-7-6, 1-8-10-6 or 1-9-10-6, as these are the shortest routes.
Partial map of the Internet, based on the January 15, 2005 data found on opte.org . Each line is drawn between two nodes, representing two IP addresses. The length of the lines is indicative of the delay between those two nodes. This graph represents less than 30% of the Class C networks reachable.

In packet-switched networks, routing protocols direct packet forwarding through intermediate nodes.

Rack containing several enterprise class routers connected to multiple networks

Convergence (routing)

State of a set of routers that have the same topological information about the internetwork in which they operate.

State of a set of routers that have the same topological information about the internetwork in which they operate.

Rack containing several enterprise class routers connected to multiple networks

For a set of routers to have converged, they must have collected all available topology information from each other via the implemented routing protocol, the information they gathered must not contradict any other router's topology information in the set, and it must reflect the real state of the network.

IPv6 header

IPv6

Most recent version of the Internet Protocol (IP), the communications protocol that provides an identification and location system for computers on networks and routes traffic across the Internet.

Most recent version of the Internet Protocol (IP), the communications protocol that provides an identification and location system for computers on networks and routes traffic across the Internet.

IPv6 header
Glossary of terms used for IPv6 addresses
Decomposition of the dot-decimal IPv4 address representation to its binary value
Multicast structure in IPv6
Several examples of IPv6 extension headers
IPv6 packet header
A general structure for an IPv6 unicast address
The Link-Local Unicast Address structure in IPv6
The global unicast address structure in IPv6
IPv6 Prefix Assignment mechanism with IANA, RIRs, and ISPs
IPv4-compatible IPv6 unicast address
IPv4-mapped IPv6 unicast address
A timeline for the standards governing IPv6
Monthly IPv6 allocations per regional Internet registry (RIR)

Dual-stack clients should only be configured to prefer IPv6, if the network is able to forward IPv6 packets using the IPv6 versions of routing protocols.

A small example network with eight vertices and ten edges

Routing

Process of selecting a path for traffic in a network or between or across multiple networks.

Process of selecting a path for traffic in a network or between or across multiple networks.

A small example network with eight vertices and ten edges

Routing tables may be specified by an administrator, learned by observing network traffic or built with the assistance of routing protocols.

A small example network with eight vertices and ten edges

GNU Zebra

A small example network with eight vertices and ten edges

Zebra is a routing software package that provides TCP/IP based routing services with routing protocols support such as RIP, OSPF and BGP.

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

Exterior gateway protocol

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

An exterior gateway protocol is a routing protocol used to exchange routing information between autonomous systems.

The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability and demand. The graph depicts an increase (that is, right-shift) in demand from D1 to D2 along with the consequent increase in price and quantity required to reach a new equilibrium point on the supply curve (S).

Scalability

Property of a system to handle a growing amount of work by adding resources to the system.

Property of a system to handle a growing amount of work by adding resources to the system.

The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability and demand. The graph depicts an increase (that is, right-shift) in demand from D1 to D2 along with the consequent increase in price and quantity required to reach a new equilibrium point on the supply curve (S).

A routing protocol is considered scalable with respect to network size, if the size of the necessary routing table on each node grows as O(log N), where N is the number of nodes in the network. Some early peer-to-peer (P2P) implementations of Gnutella had scaling issues. Each node query flooded its requests to all nodes. The demand on each peer increased in proportion to the total number of peers, quickly overrunning their capacity. Other P2P systems like BitTorrent scale well because the demand on each peer is independent of the number of peers. Nothing is centralized, so the system can expand indefinitely without any resources other than the peers themselves.

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

Exterior Gateway Protocol

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

The Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP) was a routing protocol used to connect different autonomous systems on the Internet from the mid-1980s until the mid-1990s, when it was replaced by Border Gateway Protocol (BGP).

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

Path-vector routing protocol

Routing protocol classification computer networks.

A path-vector routing protocol is a network routing protocol which maintains the path information that gets updated dynamically.