Roy Meadow

Sir Roy MeadowProfessor Sir Roy MeadowMr and Mrs Ian GaySamuel Roy Meadow
Sir Samuel Roy Meadow (born 9 June 1933) is a retired British paediatrician.wikipedia
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Factitious disorder imposed on another

Munchausen syndrome by proxyMünchausen syndrome by proxyMunchausen by proxy
In 1977, he published an academic paper describing a phenomenon dubbed Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSbP).
The condition was first named in 1977 by Roy Meadow.

Sally Clark

Wrongful conviction of Sally Clark
The British General Medical Council (GMC) struck him from the British Medical Register after he was found to have offered erroneous and misleading evidence in the trial of Sally Clark, who was wrongly convicted of the murder of her two baby sons.
The prosecution case relied on flawed statistical evidence presented by paediatrician Professor Sir Roy Meadow, who testified that the chance of two children from an affluent family suffering SIDS was 1 in 73 million.

General Medical Council

GMCstruck offMedical Register
The British General Medical Council (GMC) struck him from the British Medical Register after he was found to have offered erroneous and misleading evidence in the trial of Sally Clark, who was wrongly convicted of the murder of her two baby sons.
She had also campaigned against Sir Roy Meadow and Professor David Southall, who were erased from the medical register by the GMC but subsequently re-instated after court rulings.

Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

British Paediatric AssociationFRCPCHHonFRCPCH
He was awarded the Donald Paterson prize of the British Paediatric Association in 1968 for a study of the effects on parents of having a child in hospital.

Meadow's law

This became known as "Meadow's Law" and was influential in the thinking of UK social workers and child protection agencies, such as the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
The name is derived from the controversial British paediatrician, Roy Meadow, who until 2003 was seen by many as "Britain's most eminent paediatrician" and leading expert on child abuse.

Angela Cannings

The following December Angela Cannings, a mother convicted on Meadow's evidence, was freed on appeal.
Cannings was convicted after the involvement in her case of Professor Sir Roy Meadow, a paediatrician who was later struck off, then reinstated, by the General Medical Council.

Prosecutor's fallacy

matches" someone
The statistical criticisms were threefold: firstly, Meadow was accused of applying the so-called prosecutor's fallacy in which the probability of "cause given effect" (i.e. the true likelihood of a suspect's innocence) is confused with that of "effect given cause" (the probability that an innocent person would lose two children in this manner).

Donna Anthony

In the event, however, only a relatively small number of appeals were actually launched, though most of these were successful (including that of Donna Anthony, who served six years after being wrongly convicted of killing her son and daughter).
She was one of several women at the centre of high-profile cases where evidence given by the controversial paediatrician Professor Sir Roy Meadow led to convictions of mothers who reported more than one cot death.

Trupti Patel

In June 2003, the CPS used Meadow's expert testimony against Trupti Patel, a pharmacist accused of killing three of her babies.
It was one of a number of cases in which evidence was given by Roy Meadow, a controversial pediatrician whose testimony helped to convict Sally Clark, Angela Cannings, and Donna Anthony of murdering their babies.

Richard Horton (editor)

Richard Horton
On the first day of Meadow's defence Dr Richard Horton Editor of The Lancet, published an article in defence of Meadow.
Horton published an article in 2005 supporting Professor Sir Roy Meadow who had been charged with serious professional misconduct by the GMC for giving erroneous and seriously misleading evidence in the Sally Clark trial.

Knight Bachelor

knightedknighthoodKt
In 1980 he was awarded a professorial chair in paediatrics at St James’s University Hospital, Leeds, and in 1998, he was knighted for services to child health.

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

NSPCCSociety for the Prevention of Cruelty to ChildrenNational Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)
This became known as "Meadow's Law" and was influential in the thinking of UK social workers and child protection agencies, such as the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

Expert witness

expert testimonyexpert evidenceexpert opinion
Meadow's reputation was severely damaged after his appearances as an expert witness for the prosecution in several trials played a crucial part in wrongful convictions for murder.

Alcohol intoxication

drunkdrunkennessintoxicated
Clark's conviction was overturned in 2003 but she never recovered from the experience, and died in 2007 from alcohol poisoning.

High Court of Justice

High CourtChancery DivisionHigh Court of England and Wales
The GMC concluded in July 2005 that Meadow was guilty, but he appealed to the High Court, which in February 2006 ruled in his favour.

Court of Appeal (England and Wales)

Court of AppealCourt of Appeal of England and WalesEnglish Court of Appeal
The GMC appealed to the Court of Appeal, but in October 2006, by a majority decision, the court upheld the ruling that Meadow was not guilty of the GMC's charge.

Wigan

Wigan, EnglandWigan, LancashireWigan, Greater Manchester
Meadow was born in Wigan, Lancashire, the son of Samuel and Doris Meadow.

Lancashire

Lancashire, EnglandCounty Palatine of LancasterLancaster
Meadow was born in Wigan, Lancashire, the son of Samuel and Doris Meadow.

Worcester College, Oxford

Worcester CollegeWorcesterWorcester College, Oxford University
He studied medicine at Worcester College, Oxford, and later practised as a GP in Banbury, Oxfordshire.

University of Oxford

Oxford UniversityOxfordUniversity
He studied medicine at Worcester College, Oxford, and later practised as a GP in Banbury, Oxfordshire.

Banbury

Banbury, OxfordshireBanburyshireBanbury Cross
He studied medicine at Worcester College, Oxford, and later practised as a GP in Banbury, Oxfordshire.

Anna Freud

AnnaA. FreudFreudian
Throughout his early years in medicine, Meadow was a devoted admirer of Anna Freud (daughter of Sigmund Freud), whose lectures he would often attend.

Sigmund Freud

FreudFreudianFreudian theory
Throughout his early years in medicine, Meadow was a devoted admirer of Anna Freud (daughter of Sigmund Freud), whose lectures he would often attend.

Evening Standard

London Evening StandardThe Evening StandardThe Standard
According to the London Evening Standard, representatives of the Anna Freud Centre claimed to have no record of him completing a formal training there and repudiated his description of her philosophy.

University of Leeds

Leeds UniversityLeedsYorkshire College
Meadow was appointed professor of paediatrics and child health at the University of Leeds in 1980, based at St James's University Hospital, having previously been a Senior Lecturer in the same department.