Royal Arms of Scotland

Scotlandfor Scotlandroyal coat of arms of ScotlandRoyal coat of armsScottish royal armsLion Rampantroyal armsarms of Scotlandcoat of armscoat of arms of Scotland
The royal arms of Scotland is the official coat of arms of the King of Scots first adopted in the 12th century.wikipedia
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In My Defens God Me Defend

In Defens
Above the crest is the motto "In Defens", a contraction of "In My Defens God Me Defend" ("defens" being the Scots language spelling of "defence").
In my defens God me defend is the motto of both the Royal coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland and Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland.

Honours of Scotland

Regalia of ScotlandScottish Crown JewelsScottish regalia
Upon the helm sits the crest, depicting the red lion, forward facing and sitting atop the Crown of Scotland, displaying the Honours of Scotland.
They also appear on the crest of the royal coat of arms of Scotland and on the Scottish version of the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, where the red lion of the King of Scots is depicted holding the sword and sceptre and wearing the crown.

Nemo me impune lacessit

Nemo me impune lacessetone possible source
The motto of the Order of the Thistle, Nemo me impune lacessit, appears on a blue scroll overlying the compartment.
The motto also appears, in conjunction with the collar of the Order of the Thistle, in later versions of the Royal coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland and subsequently in the version of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland.

Unicorn

unicornsAlicornThe Unicorn
The supporters are two crowned and chained unicorns, the dexter supporting a banner of the arms, (only in this instance is the lion depicted facing away from the lance, whereas when flown correctly the lion should face towards or respect the lance or, in most cases, the flag pole); the sinister supporting the national flag of Scotland.
Two unicorns supported the royal arms of the King of Scots, and since the 1707 union of England and Scotland, the royal arms of the United Kingdom have been supported by a unicorn along with an English lion.

Crown of Scotland

Scottish Crowncrown
Upon the helm sits the crest, depicting the red lion, forward facing and sitting atop the Crown of Scotland, displaying the Honours of Scotland.
As well as appearing in Scottish versions of the Royal Cypher and Royal Coat of Arms, including the version of the arms used by the Scotland Office, stylised versions of the crown appear upon the badges of the Royal Regiment of Scotland, The Royal British Legion Scotland, the Scottish Ambulance Service, Police Scotland and upon the logos of the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service, RCAHMS, and General Register Office for Scotland.

Lion (heraldry)

lionlion rampantlions
deriving from Henry the Lion, the royal coat of arms of Scotland, attributed to William the Lion,

Flag of Scotland

saltireScotlandSt Andrew's Cross
The supporters are two crowned and chained unicorns, the dexter supporting a banner of the arms, (only in this instance is the lion depicted facing away from the lance, whereas when flown correctly the lion should face towards or respect the lance or, in most cases, the flag pole); the sinister supporting the national flag of Scotland.
In Canada, an inverse representation of the flag (i.e. a blue saltire on a white field), combined with the shield from the royal arms of the Kingdom of Scotland, forms the modern flag of the province of Nova Scotia.

Royal Arms of England

royal armsEnglandfor England
The Kingdom of England, (1603–1707)
Nevertheless, although referencing the personal union with Scotland and Ireland, the Royal Arms of England remained distinct from the Royal Arms of Scotland, until the two realms were joined in a political union in 1707, leading to a unified Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom.

Royal Banner of Scotland

Lion RampantRoyal BannerRoyal Standard
The arms in banner form is still used by various officials in Scotland and is called the Royal Banner, or more commonly, the Lion Rampant. However, the original royal banner of Scotland, also known as the "Lion Rampant", continues to be used officially in Scotland; being flown from royal residences when the Queen is not in residence and used in an official capacity by the First Minister, Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, Lord Lyon King of Arms and Lord Lieutenants in their Lieutenancies.
This emblem occupied the shield of the royal coat of arms of the ancient Kingdom of Scotland which, together with a royal banner displaying the same, was used by the King of Scots until the Union of the Crowns in 1603, when James VI acceded to the thrones of the kingdoms of England and Ireland.

James VI and I

James IJames VIKing James I
With the Union of the Crowns in 1603, James VI inherited the thrones of England and Ireland and thus his arms in Scotland were now quartered with the arms of England (which was itself quartered with France) with an additional quarter for Ireland also added (the arms would continue to alter in later years).
As King of Scots, James bore the ancient royal arms of Scotland: Or, a lion rampant Gules armed and langued Azure within a double tressure flory counter-flory Gules.

Charles II of England

Charles IIKing Charles IIPrince Charles
During the reign of King Charles II, the royal arms used in Scotland were augmented with the inclusion of the Latin motto of the Order of the Thistle, the highest Chivalric order of the Kingdom of Scotland.
His arms as monarch were: Quarterly, I and IV Grandquarterly, Azure three fleurs-de-lis Or (for France) and Gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or (for England); II Or a lion rampant within a double tressure flory-counter-flory Gules (for Scotland); III Azure a harp Or stringed Argent (for Ireland).

Coat of arms of Nova Scotia

armsArms of Majesty in Right of Nova ScotiaArms of Her Majesty in Right of Nova Scotia
Both the flag and arms of Nova Scotia feature elements of the Scottish arms.
It is blazoned as follows: Argent, a saltire azure charged with an escutcheon of the Royal Arms of Scotland.

Lord-lieutenant

lieutenancylord lieutenantLords Lieutenant
However, the original royal banner of Scotland, also known as the "Lion Rampant", continues to be used officially in Scotland; being flown from royal residences when the Queen is not in residence and used in an official capacity by the First Minister, Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, Lord Lyon King of Arms and Lord Lieutenants in their Lieutenancies.
While in their lieutenancies, lord-lieutenants are among the few individuals in Scotland officially permitted to fly the banner of the Royal Arms of Scotland, or "The Lion Rampant" as it is more commonly known.

Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom

Royal Armsroyal coat of armsRoyal Arms of the United Kingdom
Poetically described as "the ruddy lion ramping in his field of tressured gold", the arms are still widely used today as a symbol of Scotland, and are quartered in the royal arms of Queen Elizabeth II along with the arms of England and Ireland. Following the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837, the modern royal arms of the United Kingdom were adopted.
According to legend a free unicorn was considered a very dangerous beast; therefore the heraldic unicorn is chained, as were both supporting unicorns in the royal coat of arms of Scotland.

Arms of Canada

Royal Arms of CanadaCanadian coat of armscoat of arms
However, the modern versions of the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland used both in Scotland and elsewhere, and also the arms of Canada, continue to feature an Irish harp to represent Northern Ireland.
By 1957, the arms were redrawn by Alan Beddoe so as to have red leaves and to change the royal crown from one of a Tudor design to one more resembling St. Edward's Crown, as preferred by Queen Elizabeth II. To mark the 1982 patriation of the Canadian constitution, which finally ended the last vestiges of British authority over Canada, a McGill University student named Bruce Hicks proposed to Secretary of State Gerald Regan that the motto of the Order of Canada be placed around the shield in order to bring these royal arms into line with other royal arms, many of which have been displayed in Canada during French, Scottish, and English colonisation, where those countries' highest national order of honour appears around the shield of the arms (the British arms displayed the Order of the Garter, the Scottish royal arms the Order of the Thistle, and the royalist arms of the French Regime the Order of the Holy Spirit and Order of Saint Michael).

Flag of Nova Scotia

flagNova Scotiaprovincial flag
Both the flag and arms of Nova Scotia feature elements of the Scottish arms.
The flag of the modern Canadian province, a blue saltire on a white field (background), is a simple figure-ground reversal of the flag of Scotland (a white saltire, Saint Andrew's cross, on a blue field), charged with an inescutcheon bearing the royal arms of Scotland, a gold shield with a red lion rampant surrounded by a loyal double tressure (a double border decorated with fleurs de lis).

Queen Victoria

Victoriathe QueenQueen
Following the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837, the modern royal arms of the United Kingdom were adopted.
Outside Scotland, the blazon for the shield—also used on the Royal Standard—is: Quarterly: I and IV, Gules, three lions passant guardant in pale Or (for England); II, Or, a lion rampant within a double tressure flory-counter-flory Gules (for Scotland); III, Azure, a harp Or stringed Argent (for Ireland).

Court of the Lord Lyon

The Court of the Lord LyonLyon CourtCourt
Court of the Lord Lyon
These officers of arms wear the tabard of the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom, with the Scottish quarter taking precedence, made out of velvet and gold.

Unicorn (coin)

unicorngold unicorngold unicorns
Unicorn (coin)
The significance is that the unicorn is one of the heraldic symbols of Scotland, two of them occurring, most notably, crowned and chained, as the supporters of the royal coat of arms of Scotland.

Duke of Rothesay

Duke of Rothesay (1398)RothesayDuke
The arms of the Duke of Rothesay quarter the arms of the Great Steward of Scotland, with the arms of the Lord of the Isles.
The arms of the current Duke are distinguished from those of Clan Stewart of Appin through the addition of an inescutcheon displaying the arms of the heir apparent to the King of Scots, namely the Royal arms of Scotland with a three-point label.

Scottish heraldry

ScottishCoat of ArmsHeraldic judge in Scotland
Scottish heraldry

Crest (heraldry)

crestheraldic crestcrests
Atop the shield sits the helm and crest.

Mantling

lambrequinlambrequinsmantled
The helm is full-faced of damasked gold with six bars and features gold mantling lined with ermine.

Ermine (heraldry)

ermineermineserminois
The helm is full-faced of damasked gold with six bars and features gold mantling lined with ermine.