Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England

Royal Commission on Historical MonumentsRoyal Commission on Historical Monuments (England)RCHMEEnglandRCHMEnglish Royal Commission on Historical MonumentsRoyal CommissionRoyal Commission of Ancient and Historical MonumentsRoyal Commission on Historic MonumentsRoyal Commission on Historical Monuments of England
The Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England (RCHME) was a government advisory body responsible for documenting buildings and monuments of archaeological, architectural and historical importance in England.wikipedia
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Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland

RCAHMSAncient Monuments Board for ScotlandThe Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland
It was established in 1908 (shortly after the parallel commissions for Scotland and Wales); and was merged with English Heritage in 1999. His suggestion bore fruit, and led to the establishment in turn of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland on 14 February 1908; the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales in August 1908; and, finally, by Royal Warrant dated 27 October 1908, the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England).
It was established (shortly ahead of parallel commissions for Wales and England) by a Royal Warrant of 1908, which was revised in 1992.

English Heritage

EHAncient Monuments BoardEnglish Heritage Trust
It was established in 1908 (shortly after the parallel commissions for Scotland and Wales); and was merged with English Heritage in 1999.
In 1999 the organisation merged with the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England and the National Monuments Record, bringing together resources for the identification and survey of England's historic environment.

Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts

Historical Manuscripts CommissionHistorical Manuscript CommissionHMC
Brown had explicitly proposed that the issues should be addressed by a Royal Commission, comparable to the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts.
The Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts (widely known as the Historical Manuscripts Commission, and abbreviated as the HMC to distinguish it from the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England), was a United Kingdom Royal Commission established in 1869 to survey and report on privately owned and privately held archival records of general historical interest.

Historic England

Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for EnglandEnglish HeritageHistoric Building and Monuments Commission for England
The research section and the archive are now part of Historic England. In 2015 the work of the NMR moved with the archive to Historic England and became the Historic England Archive.
The archive also holds various nationally important collections and the results of older projects such as the work of the National Buildings Record, later absorbed by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England and the Images of England project which set out to create a freely accessible online database of the 370,000 listed properties in England as a snapshot in time at the turn of the millennium.

Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales

RCAHMWRoyal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments in Wales and MonmouthshireCoflein
It was established in 1908 (shortly after the parallel commissions for Scotland and Wales); and was merged with English Heritage in 1999. His suggestion bore fruit, and led to the establishment in turn of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland on 14 February 1908; the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales in August 1908; and, finally, by Royal Warrant dated 27 October 1908, the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England).
The merger would have been similar to that undertaken in England in 1999, when the English Royal Commission was absorbed into English Heritage.

Gerard Baldwin Brown

G. Baldwin BrownBaldwin BrownGerald Baldwin Brown
Critics, including David Murray in his Archaeological Survey of the United Kingdom (1896) and Gerard Baldwin Brown in his Care of Ancient Monuments (1905), had argued that, for the legislation to be effective, a detailed list of significant monuments needed to be compiled, and had made unfavourable comparisons between the policies of Britain and its European neighbours.
The book came to the attention of Sir John Sinclair, Secretary for Scotland, and led to the establishment in February 1908 of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (on which Brown served as one of the first Commissioners), followed by equivalent Royal Commissions for Wales and England.

Herbert Gardner, 1st Baron Burghclere

Herbert GardnerBaron BurghclereLord Burghclere
The first Commissioners comprised Lord Burghclere (chairman); Sir Henry Howarth (nominated by the Royal Archaeological Institute); Lord Balcarres (nominated by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings); J.G.N. Clift (nominated by the British Archaeological Association); Leonard Stokes (nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects); Francis Haverfield; James Fitzgerald; Viscount Dillon; the Earl of Plymouth; E.J. Horniman, MP; and Sir John F.F. Horner.
He was an Ecclesiastical Commissioner from 1903 to 1921 and chairman of Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England.

British History Online

The published inventories are now available to view in full at British History Online.
The content includes secondary sources such as the publications of The History of Parliament, the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, the Calendar of Close Rolls, Survey of London and the Victoria County History; and major published primary sources such as Letters and Papers of the Reign of Henry VIII and the Journals of the House of Lords and House of Commons.

Historic England Archive

English Heritage ArchiveNational Buildings RecordNational Monuments Record
In 2015 the work of the NMR moved with the archive to Historic England and became the Historic England Archive.
The roots of the archive go back to 1908 and the foundation of the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England (RCHME) which was set up to compile and publish an inventory of all ancient and historical monuments up to the year 1700 by county and by parish.

Survey of London

The Survey of LondonLondon Survey Committee
The Survey of London, a project to undertake an architectural survey of the former County of London, was founded as a private initiative in 1894, but was later taken over by the Greater London Council (GLC).
Following the abolition of the GLC in 1986, responsibility for the survey was taken over by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England (RCHME).

Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882

Inspector of Ancient MonumentsAncient Monuments ActAncient Monuments Act of 1882
The Royal Commission was established in 1908, twenty-six years after the passage of the Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882, which provided the first state protection for ancient monuments in the United Kingdom, and eight years after the passage of the wider-ranging Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1900.

Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1900

1900
The Royal Commission was established in 1908, twenty-six years after the passage of the Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882, which provided the first state protection for ancient monuments in the United Kingdom, and eight years after the passage of the wider-ranging Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1900.

Learned society

learned societiesscientific societyscientific societies
Learned societies including the British Archaeological Association, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Royal Society of Arts also lobbied for action to be taken.

British Archaeological Association

British Archæological AssociationJournal of the British Archaeological AssociationArchaeological Association
Learned societies including the British Archaeological Association, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Royal Society of Arts also lobbied for action to be taken.

Society of Antiquaries of London

Society of AntiquariesFSAFellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London
Learned societies including the British Archaeological Association, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Royal Society of Arts also lobbied for action to be taken.

Royal Institute of British Architects

RIBAFRIBAARIBA
Learned societies including the British Archaeological Association, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Royal Society of Arts also lobbied for action to be taken.

Royal Society of Arts

Society of ArtsFRSARoyal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
Learned societies including the British Archaeological Association, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Royal Society of Arts also lobbied for action to be taken.

Royal commission

Royal CommissionerRoyal Commission of InquiryCommission of Inquiry
Brown had explicitly proposed that the issues should be addressed by a Royal Commission, comparable to the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts.

Royal sign-manual

Royal Sign ManualRoyal Warrantsign manual
His suggestion bore fruit, and led to the establishment in turn of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland on 14 February 1908; the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales in August 1908; and, finally, by Royal Warrant dated 27 October 1908, the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England).

Monmouthshire (historic)

MonmouthshireCounty of MonmouthMonmouth
Under the terms of its warrant, the Commission's remit was "to make an inventory of the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions connected with or illustrative of the contemporary culture, civilization and conditions of life of the people of England, excluding Monmouthshire, from the earliest times to the year 1700, and to specify those which seem most worthy of preservation".

Anne, Queen of Great Britain

Queen AnneAnnePrincess Anne
A revised warrant of 29 November 1913 extended the terminal date to 1714 (the accession of Queen Anne).

Royal Archaeological Institute

Royal Archæological InstituteArchæological InstituteArchaeological Institute
The first Commissioners comprised Lord Burghclere (chairman); Sir Henry Howarth (nominated by the Royal Archaeological Institute); Lord Balcarres (nominated by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings); J.G.N. Clift (nominated by the British Archaeological Association); Leonard Stokes (nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects); Francis Haverfield; James Fitzgerald; Viscount Dillon; the Earl of Plymouth; E.J. Horniman, MP; and Sir John F.F. Horner.

David Lindsay, 27th Earl of Crawford

The Earl of CrawfordLord BalcarresLord Balniel
The first Commissioners comprised Lord Burghclere (chairman); Sir Henry Howarth (nominated by the Royal Archaeological Institute); Lord Balcarres (nominated by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings); J.G.N. Clift (nominated by the British Archaeological Association); Leonard Stokes (nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects); Francis Haverfield; James Fitzgerald; Viscount Dillon; the Earl of Plymouth; E.J. Horniman, MP; and Sir John F.F. Horner.

Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

SPABSociety for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB)
The first Commissioners comprised Lord Burghclere (chairman); Sir Henry Howarth (nominated by the Royal Archaeological Institute); Lord Balcarres (nominated by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings); J.G.N. Clift (nominated by the British Archaeological Association); Leonard Stokes (nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects); Francis Haverfield; James Fitzgerald; Viscount Dillon; the Earl of Plymouth; E.J. Horniman, MP; and Sir John F.F. Horner.

Leonard Stokes

The first Commissioners comprised Lord Burghclere (chairman); Sir Henry Howarth (nominated by the Royal Archaeological Institute); Lord Balcarres (nominated by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings); J.G.N. Clift (nominated by the British Archaeological Association); Leonard Stokes (nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects); Francis Haverfield; James Fitzgerald; Viscount Dillon; the Earl of Plymouth; E.J. Horniman, MP; and Sir John F.F. Horner.