Royal Engineers

Corps of Royal EngineersRoyal EngineerREThe Sapper VCsR.E.engineersengineerCorps of EngineersRoyal Sappers and MinersRoyal Corps of Engineers
The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is a corps of the British Army.wikipedia
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Chief Royal Engineer

Inspector-General of FortificationsChief EngineerChief Engineer of Great Britain
It provides military engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces and is headed by the Chief Royal Engineer.
The Chief Royal Engineer (CRE) is the official head of the Corps of Royal Engineers of the British Army.

Royal School of Military Engineering

School of Military EngineeringBrompton BarracksRoyal Engineer Establishment
The Regimental Headquarters and the Royal School of Military Engineering are in Chatham in Kent, England.
During this war low ranking Royal Engineers officers carried out large scale operations.

Sapper

sappersPontonierengineers
The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is a corps of the British Army.
Sapper (abbreviated Spr) is the Royal Engineers' equivalent of private.

Battle honours of the British and Imperial Armies

battle honoursHonorary Distinctionbattle honour
The Corps has no battle honours.
Also in 1832, the motto Ubique (Everywhere) was awarded by King William IV to the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers in recognition of their universal service.

Bermuda Volunteer Engineers

These included a submarine mining militia company that was authorised for Bermuda in 1892, but never raised, and the Bermuda Volunteer Engineers that wore Royal Engineers uniforms and replaced the regular Royal Engineers companies withdrawn from the Bermuda Garrison in 1928.
The Bermuda Volunteer Engineers was a part-time unit created between the two world wars to replace the Regular Royal Engineers detachment, which was withdrawn from the Bermuda Garrison in 1928.

Tunnelling companies of the Royal Engineers

tunnelling companiesRoyal Engineer tunnelling companiesTunnelling Companies RE
In 1915, in response to German mining of British trenches under the then static siege conditions of the First World War, the corps formed its own tunnelling companies.
Royal Engineer tunnelling companies were specialist units of the Corps of Royal Engineers within the British Army, formed to dig attacking tunnels under enemy lines during the First World War.

Chatham, Kent

ChathamChatham, EnglandChatham, Medway
The Regimental Headquarters and the Royal School of Military Engineering are in Chatham in Kent, England. The following year, the Royal Engineers and Royal Sappers and Miners became a unified corps as the Corps of Royal Engineers and their headquarters were moved from the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, to Chatham, Kent.
The Corps of Royal Engineers is still based in Chatham at Brompton Barracks.

Royal Flying Corps

RFCRoyal Flying Corpairman
The Air Battalion was the forerunner of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.
The Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers became the Military Wing of the Royal Flying Corps a month later on 13 May.

Volunteer Force

VolunteerVolunteer movementVolunteers
The re-organisation of the British military that began in the mid-Nineteenth Century and stretched over several decades included the reconstitution of the Militia, the raising of the Volunteer Force, and the ever-closer organisation of the part-time forces with the regular army.
Most of the regiments of the present Territorial Army Infantry, Artillery, Engineers and Signals units are directly descended from Volunteer Force units.

Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment

Royal EngineersColumbia DetachmentColumbia Detachment of the Royal Engineers
The Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, commanded by Richard Clement Moody, was responsible for the foundation and settlement of British Columbia as the Colony of British Columbia.
The Columbia Detachment of the Royal Engineers was a contingent of the Royal Engineers of the British Army that was responsible for the foundation of British Columbia as the Colony of British Columbia (1858–66).

Richard Clement Moody

Richard MoodyMajor-General Richard Clement MoodyMoody
The Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, commanded by Richard Clement Moody, was responsible for the foundation and settlement of British Columbia as the Colony of British Columbia.
His Excellency, Major-General The Honourable Richard Clement Moody (13 February 1813 – 31 March 1887) was a British Imperialist, Colonial Governor, Royal Engineer, musician, and architect.

Board of Ordnance

Ordnance BoardOrdnance OfficeOffice of Ordnance
Engineers have always served in the armies of the Crown; however, the origins of the modern corps, along with those of the Royal Artillery, lie in the Board of Ordnance established in the 15th century.
Having established the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers, however, the Board had parallel oversight of both a Military and a Civil Establishment.

Vampire dugout

Manned by experienced coal miners from across the country, they operated with great success until 1917, when after the fixed positions broke, they built deep dugouts such as the Vampire dugout to protect troops from heavy shelling.
It was created as a British brigade headquarters in early 1918 by the 171st Tunnelling Company of the Royal Engineers after the Third Battle of Ypres/Battle of Passchendaele.

Royal Albert Hall

Albert HallThe Royal Albert HallThe Albert Hall
The Royal Albert Hall is one of the UK's most treasured and distinctive buildings, recognisable the world over.
The Hall was designed by civil engineers Captain Francis Fowke and Major-General Henry Y. D. Scott of the Royal Engineers and built by Lucas Brothers.

Henry Young Darracott Scott

Henry ScottMajor-General Henry Y. D. Scott
The Hall was designed by Captain Francis Fowke and Major-General Henry Y. D. Scott of the Royal Engineers and built by Lucas Brothers.
Henry Young Darracott Scott RE (2 January 1822 – 16 April 1883) was an English Major-General in the Corps of Royal Engineers, best known for the construction of London's Royal Albert Hall.

Royal Arsenal

Woolwich ArsenalWoolwichRoyal Laboratory
The following year, the Royal Engineers and Royal Sappers and Miners became a unified corps as the Corps of Royal Engineers and their headquarters were moved from the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, to Chatham, Kent.
The military constitution of the Board of Ordnance was strengthened when, on 26 May 1716, a Royal Warrant directed that two companies of artillery (of a hundred men each, plus officers) and a separate corps of twenty-six military engineers (all officers) be formed on a permanent basis: this marked the foundation of the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers.

Air Battalion Royal Engineers

Air BattalionAir Battalion of the Royal EngineersBritish Air Battalion
In 1911 the Corps formed its Air Battalion, the first flying unit of the British Armed Forces.
An order was issued on 28 February 1911 for the formation of the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers effective 1 April the same year.

Bermuda Garrison

military garrisongarrisonImperial military garrison
These included a submarine mining militia company that was authorised for Bermuda in 1892, but never raised, and the Bermuda Volunteer Engineers that wore Royal Engineers uniforms and replaced the regular Royal Engineers companies withdrawn from the Bermuda Garrison in 1928.
From the beginning, the Royal Engineers were an important part of the Garrison, improving pre-existing fortifications and batteries, like Fort St. Catherine's, building new ones, surveying the island, building a causeway to link St. George's Island to the Main Island, a lighthouse at Gibb's Hill, and various other facilities.

Victoria and Albert Museum

Victoria & Albert MuseumV&ASouth Kensington Museum
The designers were heavily influenced by ancient amphitheatres, but had also been exposed to the ideas of Gottfried Semper while he was working at the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Its architect was civil engineer Captain Francis Fowke, Royal Engineers, who was appointed by Cole.

Francis Fowke

Captain Francis Fowke
The Hall was designed by Captain Francis Fowke and Major-General Henry Y. D. Scott of the Royal Engineers and built by Lucas Brothers.
Francis Fowke RE (7 July 1823 – 4 December 1865) was a British engineer and architect, and a Captain in the Corps of Royal Engineers.

Joshua Jebb

Sir Joshua Jebb
Captain (later Major General Sir) Joshua Jebb designed Pentonville Prison, introducing new concepts such as single cells with good heating, ventilation and sanitation.
Sir Joshua Jebb, (8 May 1793 – 26 June 1863) was a Royal Engineer and the British Surveyor-General of convict prisons.

William Twiss

Wiliam Twiss
First given earthworks in 1779 against the planned invasion that year, the high ground west of Dover, England, now called Dover Western Heights, was properly fortified in 1804 when Lieutenant-Colonel William Twiss was instructed to modernise the existing defences.
General William Twiss, (1745 – 14 March 1827), was a British Army Royal Engineer, responsible for the design of many military defences.

Royal Engineers Museum

Corps Museumtheir museum
The Royal Engineers Museum is in Gillingham in Kent.
It tells the story of the Corps of Royal Engineers and British military engineering in general.

Institution of Civil Engineers

FICEMICEICE
His findings were published by the Institution of Civil Engineers in England who bestowed upon him the prestigious Telford Medal.
At that time, formal engineering in Britain was limited to the military engineers of the Corps of Royal Engineers, and in the spirit of self-help prevalent at the time and to provide a focus for the fledgling 'civilian engineers', the Institution of Civil Engineers was founded as the world's first professional engineering body.

William Denison

Sir William DenisonDenisonSir William Thomas Denison
Lt. Denison was one of the junior Royal Engineers who worked under Lt. Colonel John By, RE on the Rideau Canal in Upper Canada (1826–1832).
He was born in London and studied at a private school in Sunbury before going to study at Eton College and the Royal Military College and entered the Royal Engineers in 1826 after spending some time in the Ordnance Survey.