Royal Military College, Sandhurst

Royal Military CollegeSandhurstRoyal Military College SandhurstRMC SandhurstRMC, SandhurstRoyal Military College, Great MarlowRoyal Military College at SandhurstRoyal Military College, MarlowSandhurst Military Collegecollege for junior cadets
The Royal Military College (RMC), founded in 1801 and established in 1802 at Great Marlow and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, but moved in October 1812 to Sandhurst, Berkshire, was a British Army military academy for training infantry and cavalry officers of the British and Indian Armies.wikipedia
1,232 Related Articles

Military academy

military schoolmilitary academiesmilitary college
The Royal Military College (RMC), founded in 1801 and established in 1802 at Great Marlow and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, but moved in October 1812 to Sandhurst, Berkshire, was a British Army military academy for training infantry and cavalry officers of the British and Indian Armies.
The Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in England was the brainchild of John Le Marchant in 1801, who established schools for the military instruction of officers at High Wycombe and Great Marlow, with a grant of £30,000 from Parliament.

British Indian Army

Indian ArmyIndianreforms
The Royal Military College (RMC), founded in 1801 and established in 1802 at Great Marlow and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, but moved in October 1812 to Sandhurst, Berkshire, was a British Army military academy for training infantry and cavalry officers of the British and Indian Armies.
Accordingly, vacancies in the Indian Army were much sought after and generally reserved for the higher placed officer-cadets graduating from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

Royal Military Academy Sandhurst

SandhurstRoyal Military Academy, SandhurstRoyal Military College, Sandhurst
In 1947, the Royal Military College was merged with the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, to form the present-day all-purpose Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.
The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst was formed on the site of the former Royal Military College (founded in 1801 for the training of officers for arms other than the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers) in 1947 when it amalgamated with the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, (founded in 1741 for the training of officers for the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers).

Royal Military Academy, Woolwich

Royal Military AcademyRoyal Military Academy WoolwichRoyal Military Academy at Woolwich
In 1947, the Royal Military College was merged with the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, to form the present-day all-purpose Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.
Of the younger cadets, sixty were kept at the Warren (by then renamed the Royal Arsenal) and another sixty were sent to a new college for junior cadets at Great Marlow.

Staff College, Camberley

Staff CollegeBritish Army Staff CollegeCamberley Staff College
In 1858 this became a separate institution, the Staff College.
It had its origins in the Royal Military College, High Wycombe founded in 1799, which in 1802 became the Senior Department of the new Royal Military College.

Mons Officer Cadet School

Mons161 Infantry Officer Cadet Training UnitEaton Hall
On the outbreak of the Second World War, many of the cadets and staff of the Royal Military College were mobilised for active service, but the buildings at Sandhurst remained the home of the RMC's 161 Infantry Officer Cadet Training Unit.
In 1939, Royal Military College, Sandhurst became the home of 161 Infantry Officer Cadet Training Unit (RMC): that unit moved to Mons Barracks at Aldershot in 1942, and subsequently became known as the "Mons Officer Cadet Training Unit (Aldershot)".

Marlow, Buckinghamshire

MarlowGreat MarlowGreat Marlow, Buckinghamshire
However, in 1801 Parliament voted a grant of £30,000 for it, and in 1802 Le Marchant, appointed as the first Lieutenant Governor of the College, opened its Junior Department at a large house in West Street, Great Marlow, to train gentleman cadets for the infantry and cavalry regiments of the British Army and for the presidency armies of British India.
The Junior Wing of the Royal Military College, later moved to Sandhurst on the borders of Berkshire and Surrey, was once based in West Street, Marlow, at Remnantz, a large house built in the early 18th century which served as the Junior Department of the College from 1801 until 1812.

William Denison

Sir William DenisonDenisonSir William Thomas Denison
He was born in London and studied at a private school in Sunbury before going to study at Eton College and the Royal Military College and entered the Royal Engineers in 1826 after spending some time in the Ordnance Survey.

John Le Marchant (British Army officer, born 1766)

John Le MarchantJohn Gaspard Le MarchantLe Marchant
The Royal Military College was conceived by Colonel John Le Marchant, whose scheme for establishing schools for the military instruction of officers at High Wycombe and Great Marlow first met strong resistance on the grounds of cost.
In 1801, after overcoming considerable opposition on the grounds of cost, Le Marchant's scheme for establishing the High Wycombe and Great Marlow schools for the military instruction of officers was sanctioned by Parliament, and a grant of £30,000 was voted for the foundation of a Royal Military College, the two original departments being afterwards combined and removed to a purpose-built Royal Military College at Sandhurst.

Frederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts

Lord RobertsFrederick RobertsRoberts
Roberts was educated at Eton, Sandhurst, and Addiscombe Military Seminary before entering the East India Company Army as a second lieutenant with the Bengal Artillery on 12 December 1851.

Frederick Stanley, 16th Earl of Derby

The Lord Stanley of PrestonFrederick StanleyLord Stanley of Preston
He was born in London and was educated at Eton and Sandhurst.

John Hope, 7th Earl of Hopetoun

Lord HopetounJohn Hope, 1st Marquess of LinlithgowThe Earl of Hopetoun
He attended Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, but opted not to pursue a full-time military career.

Ronald Munro Ferguson, 1st Viscount Novar

Ronald Munro FergusonSir Ronald Munro FergusonRonald Munro-Ferguson
He attended the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and initially pursued a military career.

Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar

Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar-EisenachPrincePrince William Augustus Edward of Saxe-Weimar
After being naturalised as a British subject, Edward's military career began on 1 June 1841, when, having trained at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, he joined the 67th (South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot as an ensign.

Herbert Plumer, 1st Viscount Plumer

Herbert PlumerLord PlumerPlumer
Born the son of Hall Plumer and Louisa Alice Plumer (née Turnley) and educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, Plumer was commissioned as a lieutenant into the 65th Regiment of Foot on 11 September 1876.

James Wyatt

WyattWyatts
In 1812, the College's Junior Department moved from Great Marlow into purpose-built buildings at Sandhurst designed by James Wyatt, and was soon joined there by the Senior Department, migrating from High Wycombe.

Alfonso XII of Spain

Alfonso XIIKing Alfonso XIIKing Alfonso XII of Spain
He sent Alfonso to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in England, where the training Alfonso received was severe but more cosmopolitan than in Spain, given the current atmosphere.

Edmund Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby

Edmund AllenbyAllenbyGeneral Allenby
He sat the exam for the Royal Military College, Sandhurst in 1880 and was commissioned as a lieutenant in the 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons on 10 May 1882.

Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig

Douglas HaigSir Douglas HaigHaig
Although he passed his final exam at Oxford (a requirement for university applicants to Sandhurst), he was not eligible for a degree as he had missed a term's residence due to sickness, and if he had stayed for longer he would have been above the age limit (23) to begin officer training at the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, which he entered in January 1884.

Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone

The Earl of AthlonePrince Alexander of TeckEarl of Athlone
Prince Alexander was born in London to the Duke and Duchess of Teck and was educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet

Charles FergussonSir Charles FergussonGeneral Sir Charles Fergusson
He was educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, before joining the Grenadier Guards in 1883.

Remnantz

large houseGreat Marlow
However, in 1801 Parliament voted a grant of £30,000 for it, and in 1802 Le Marchant, appointed as the first Lieutenant Governor of the College, opened its Junior Department at a large house in West Street, Great Marlow, to train gentleman cadets for the infantry and cavalry regiments of the British Army and for the presidency armies of British India.
The main house was built around 1720 and was occupied by the Royal Military Academy, a facility conceived by Colonel John Le Marchant for training potential junior officers aged 13 to 18, from the Academy's formation in May 1802 until it moved to Sandhurst as the Junior Department of the Royal Military College, in 1811.

Archibald Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell

Archibald WavellLord WavellSir Archibald Wavell
Born the son of Archibald Graham Wavell (who later became a major general in the British Army and military commander of Johannesburg after its capture during the Second Boer War ) and Lillie Wavell (née Percival), Wavell attended Eaton House, followed by the leading preparatory boarding school Summer Fields near Oxford, Winchester College, where he was a scholar, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

Oswald Mosley

Sir Oswald MosleyMosleyiteSir Oswald Mosley, 6th Baronet
In January 1914, Mosley entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst but was expelled in June for a "riotous act of retaliation" against a fellow student.

Ayub Khan (general)

Ayub KhanMuhammad Ayub KhanMohammad Ayub Khan
Trained at the British Royal Military College, Ayub Khan fought in World War II as a colonel in the British Indian Army before deciding to transfer to join the Pakistan Army as an aftermath of partition of British India in 1947.