Royal Norwegian Air Force

Norwegian Air ForceAir ForceRNoAFNorwegianNorwayRNAFRoyal Norwegian AirforceAir Force of NorwayAir ServiceKongelige Norske Luftforsvaret (Royal Norwegian Air Force)
The Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) (Luftforsvaret) is the air force of Norway.wikipedia
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Norwegian Armed Forces

Norwegian militaryNorwegian Defence Forcemilitary
It was established as a separate arm of the Norwegian Armed Forces on 10 November 1944.
It consists of four branches, the Norwegian Army, the Royal Norwegian Navy, which includes the Coast Guard, the Royal Norwegian Air Force, and the Home Guard, as well as several joint departments.

Bodø Main Air Station

BodøBodø Air Stationairstrip
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
Bodø Air Station (Bodø hovedflystasjon) is a military airbase of the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) located in the town of Bodø in Bodø Municipality, Nordland county, Norway.

Ørland Main Air Station

ØrlandØrland hovedflystasjonOerland Main Air Station
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
Ørland is operated by the Royal Norwegian Air Force and is an important air base not only for Norway, but also for NATO.

Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service

air forcenaval air groupnaval aircraft
Before 1944 the Air Force were divided into the Norwegian Army Air Service (Hærens Flyvevaaben) and the Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service (Marinens Flyvevaaben).
The Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service (Marinens flyvevesen) was alongside the Norwegian Army Air Service the forerunner to the modern-day Royal Norwegian Air Force.

Rygge Air Station

Rygge
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
The Royal Norwegian Air Force operates various squadron and aircraft at the airbase, including Sea King helicopters, F-5 Freedom Fighters, Dassault Falcon 20 aircraft as well as Bell 412 helicopters.

Gardermoen Air Station

GardermoenGardermoen army baseGardermoen National Airport
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
It is the location for the 135th Airwing and the 335 Squadron of the Royal Norwegian Air Force, which currently operates four of the originally five (see: 2012 Norwegian C-130 crash) recently procured C-130J-30 Super Hercules transport aircraft.

Andøya Air Station

AndøyaAndoya Air Station
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
The 333 Squadron of the Norwegian air force is based here with P-3C Orions.

Little Norway

CanadaNorwegian presenceNorwegians
The other order for P-36s was for 36 Hawk 75A-8 (with 1200 hp Wright R-1820-95 Cyclone 9 engines), none of which were delivered in time for the invasion, but were delivered to "Little Norway" near Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Little Norway (Lille Norge), officially Flyvåpnenes Treningsleir (FTL, "Air Force Training Camp"), was a Norwegian Army Air Service/Royal Norwegian Air Force training camp in southern Ontario during the Second World War.

Oslo Airport, Fornebu

Fornebu AirportFornebuOslo Fornebu Airport
The unequal situation led to the rapid defeat of the Norwegian air forces, even though seven Gladiators from Jagevingen (the fighter wing) defended Fornebu airport against the attacking German forces with some success—claiming two Bf 110 heavy fighters, two He 111 bombers and one Junkers Ju 52 transport.
The Royal Norwegian Air Force retained offices at Fornebu.

Norwegian Army Air Service

armyNorwegian Army
Before 1944 the Air Force were divided into the Norwegian Army Air Service (Hærens Flyvevaaben) and the Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service (Marinens Flyvevaaben).
On 10 November 1944 the NoAAS was joined with the Royal Norwegian Navy Air Service to form the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

Norway

NorwegianKingdom of NorwayNOR
The Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) (Luftforsvaret) is the air force of Norway.
The military of Norway is divided into the following branches: the Norwegian Army, the Royal Norwegian Navy, the Royal Norwegian Air Force, the Norwegian Cyber Defence Force and the Home Guard.

Trondheim

TrondhjemTrondheim, NorwayDrontheim
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
The Air Force Academy of the Royal Norwegian Air Force is located at Kuhaugen in Trondheim.

Gloster Gladiator

Gloster Sea GladiatorGladiatorGloster Gladiators
In the late 1930s, as war seemed imminent, more modern aircraft was bought from abroad, including twelve Gloster Gladiator fighters from the UK, and six Heinkel He 115s from Germany.
No Norwegian Army Air Service aircraft were able to evacuate westwards before the 10 June surrender of the mainland Norwegian forces.

Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport

Toronto Island AirportToronto City Centre AirportIsland Airport
In the autumn of 1940, a Norwegian training centre known as "Little Norway" was established next to Toronto Island Airport, Canada.
From 1940 until 1943, the Royal Norwegian Air Force used the island airport as a training facility.

Værnes Air Station

VærnesVærnes GarrisonVærnesmoen
In April 2016 the life of a patient, at the hospital in Bodø, was saved when specialised medical equipment was ferried halfway across Norway, in less than half an hour, by an Air Force F-16 jet from Værnes Air Station.
Værnes Air Station (Værnes flystasjon) is an air station of the Royal Norwegian Air Force located in the municipality of Stjørdal in Trøndelag county, Norway.

Bardufoss Air Station

BardufossBardufoss airfieldBardufos airfield
The infrastructure of the RNoAF includes six airbases (at Ørland, Rygge, Andøya, Bardufoss, Bodø and Gardermoen), one control and reporting centre (at Sørreisa) and two training centres at Persaunet in Trondheim and at KNM Harald Haarfagre/Madlaleiren in Stavanger.
The Royal Norwegian Air Force's six remaining Bells (making a total of 18) are stationed at the 720 Squadron at Rygge Air Station.

Harstad/Narvik Airport, Evenes

EvenesEvenes AirportHarstad-Narvik Airport
It is co-located with Evenes Air Station of the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

Royal Danish Air Force

Danish Air ForceAir ForceDanish
In October 2002, a tri-national force of 18 Norwegian, Danish, and Dutch F-16 fighter-bombers, with one Dutch Air Force KC-10A tanker, flew to the Manas Air Base in Kyrgyzstan, to support the NATO ground forces in Afghanistan as a part of the Operation Enduring Freedom.
In October 2002, a tri-national detachment of 18 Danish, Dutch, and Norwegian F-16 fighter-bombers, with one Dutch KC-10 tanker, flew to the Manas Air Base in Kyrgyzstan, in support of the NATO ground forces in Afghanistan as part of the Operation Enduring Freedom.

NASAMS

NASAMS 2NASAMS IINorwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System
The Norwegian company Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace teamed up with Raytheon and initiated the NASAMS programme as a cooperative effort for the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

No. 330 Squadron RNoAF

330 Squadron330330th Helicopter Squadron
330 Squadron RNoAF''' (330 skvadron) is a helicopter unit of the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) and is Norway's military search and rescue service.

2011 military intervention in Libya

military intervention in Libyamilitary interventionLibyan no-fly zone
Libyan no-fly zone : In a statement, Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre condemned the violence against "peaceful protesters in Libya, Bahrain and Yemen", saying the protests "are an expression of the people’s desire for more participatory democracy. The authorities must respect fundamental human rights such as political, economic and social rights. It is now vital that all parties do their utmost to foster peaceful dialogue on reforms.".

Operation Mongoose (2003)

Operation MongooseOperation Mongoose (War in Afghanistan)
On 27-28 January, Norwegian F-16s bombed Hezb-e Islami Gulbuddin Fighters in the Adi Ghar Mountains during the beginnings of Operation Mongoose.
After interrogating, the captured fighter claimed that 80 fighters were hiding in the Adi Ghar Mountains, wanting to verify these claims, the US Special Forces dispatched two Apache helicopters to the area, taking them 26 minutes to reach the area, upon receiving fire the Apaches called for assistance from B-1B bombers, AC-130 Spectre gunships and Norwegian F-16s, making it the first time the Norwegian Air Force had seen combat since World War II.

Royal Netherlands Air Force

Dutch Air ForceDutchAir Force
In October 2002, a tri-national force of 18 Norwegian, Danish, and Dutch F-16 fighter-bombers, with one Dutch Air Force KC-10A tanker, flew to the Manas Air Base in Kyrgyzstan, to support the NATO ground forces in Afghanistan as a part of the Operation Enduring Freedom.
On 2 October 2002 a tri-national detachment of 18 Dutch, Danish and Norwegian F-16 ground attack aircraft and one Dutch KDC-10 tanker deployed to Manas Air Base in Kyrgyzstan in support of ground forces in Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Station Group Banak

BanakBanak Air Station
Operated by the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF), it serves a detachment of the 330 Squadron, which operates two Westland Sea King helicopters used for search and rescue operations in Finnmark, Svalbard and surrounding Arctic sea areas (the northern Norwegian Sea, the Barents Sea and the Arctic Sea).

Arado Ar 196

Arado 196Ar 196AAr 196
A captured Arado Ar 196 originating from the German heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper was also flown to Britain for testing.
At the end of the war, at least one Arado Ar 196 was left at a Norwegian airfield and kept in use as a liaison aircraft by the Royal Norwegian Air Force for a year on the West coast.