Royal Proclamation of 1763

Proclamation of 1763Royal ProclamationProclamation Line of 1763Proclamation LineBritish Royal Proclamation of 1763reversal of British policy1763 Royal Proclamationa royal proclamationBritish Crown declaredBritish law
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III on October 7, 1763, following Great Britain's acquisition of French territory in North America after the end of the Seven Years' War.wikipedia
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Indian Reserve (1763)

Indian ReserveBritish Indian Territoryland reserved for Indians
It forbade all settlement west of a line drawn along the Appalachian Mountains, which was delineated as an Indian Reserve.
"Indian Reserve" is a historical term for the largely uncolonized area in North America acquired by Great Britain from France through the Treaty of Paris (1763) at the end of the Seven Years' War (known as the French and Indian War in the North American theatre), and set aside in the Royal Proclamation of 1763 for use by Native Americans, who already inhabited it.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIGeorge III of Great Britain
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III on October 7, 1763, following Great Britain's acquisition of French territory in North America after the end of the Seven Years' War.
Later that year, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 placed a limit upon the westward expansion of the American colonies.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
The Royal Proclamation continues to be of legal importance to First Nations in Canada.
Under the Royal Proclamation of 1763, also known as the "Indian Magna Carta," the Crown referred to indigenous peoples in British territory as tribes or nations.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
Discontent would later arise during the American Revolution.
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 redrew boundaries of the lands west of Quebec and west of a line running along the crest of the Allegheny Mountains, making them Indian territory and barred to colonial settlement for two years.

Eastern Continental Divide

Eastern DivideAppalachian DivideContinental Divide
The 1763 proclamation line is similar to the Eastern Continental Divide's path running northwards from Georgia to the Pennsylvania–New York border and north-eastwards past the drainage divide on the St. Lawrence Divide from there northwards through New England.
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 separated settled lands of the Thirteen Colonies from lands north and west of it designated the Indian Reserve; the proclamation border ran along the Appalachian Divide but extended beyond its Pennsylvania-New York terminus north into New England.

Province of Quebec (1763–1791)

Province of QuebecQuebecBritish Province of Quebec
It established new governments for four areas: the province of Quebec, the new colonies of West Florida and East Florida, and Grenada.
By Britain's Royal Proclamation of 1763, Canada (part of New France) was renamed the Province of Quebec.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
Exclusion from the vast region of Trans-Appalachia filled people within various colonies with indignation.
To this end, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 restricted settlement west of the Appalachian Mountains, as this was designated an Indian Reserve.

Treaty of Hard Labour

Cherokee tribe
In 1768 the Treaty of Fort Stanwix and the Treaty of Hard Labour, followed in 1770 by the Treaty of Lochaber, opened much of what is now Kentucky and West Virginia to British settlement.
In an effort to resolve concerns of settlers and land speculators following the western boundary established by the Royal Proclamation of 1763 by King George III, it was desired to move the boundary further west to encompass more settlers who were outside of the boundary.

Vermont

VTState of VermontGeography of Vermont
The Proclamation established the line at 45 degrees north latitude as the boundary between Quebec and New York (including a region not yet known as Vermont, which was then disputedly considered a part of New York).
The Crown attempted to limit colonial settlement to lands east of the Appalachians, in order to prohibit encroachment on Native American lands.

Collins–Valentine line

boundary between Quebec and New YorkJohn Collins and Thomas Valentinesurveyed and marked by John Collins and Thomas Valentine
The Proclamation established the line at 45 degrees north latitude as the boundary between Quebec and New York (including a region not yet known as Vermont, which was then disputedly considered a part of New York).
In the Gazetteer of the State of New York, we read that: By royal proclamation, issued in Oct. 1763, the line 45° N. was fixed as the boundary between the provinces of Quebec and New York, and this was confirmed in council Aug. 12, 1768.

Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' War
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III on October 7, 1763, following Great Britain's acquisition of French territory in North America after the end of the Seven Years' War. The Seven Years' War (with the French and Indian War as the North American theater) ended with the Treaty of Paris.
King George III's Proclamation of 1763, which forbade white settlement beyond the crest of the Appalachians, was intended to appease the Indians but led to considerable outrage in the Thirteen Colonies, whose inhabitants were eager to acquire native lands.

Treaty of Fort Stanwix

New PurchaseFort Stanwix TreatyFort Stanwix Treaty of 1768
In 1768 the Treaty of Fort Stanwix and the Treaty of Hard Labour, followed in 1770 by the Treaty of Lochaber, opened much of what is now Kentucky and West Virginia to British settlement.
The purpose of the conference was to adjust the boundary line between Indian lands and British colonial settlements set forth in the Royal Proclamation of 1763.

Drainage divide

watershedwater dividedivide
The 1763 proclamation line is similar to the Eastern Continental Divide's path running northwards from Georgia to the Pennsylvania–New York border and north-eastwards past the drainage divide on the St. Lawrence Divide from there northwards through New England.
Since ridgelines are sometimes easy to see and agree about, drainage divides may form natural borders defining political boundaries, as with the Royal Proclamation of 1763 in British North America which coincided with the ridgeline of the Appalachian Mountains forming the Eastern Continental Divide that separated settled colonial lands in the east from Indian Territory to the west.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
The Seven Years' War (with the French and Indian War as the North American theater) ended with the Treaty of Paris.
King George III issued the Royal Proclamation of 1763 on October 7, 1763 which outlined the division and administration of the newly conquered territory, and it continues to govern relations to some extent between the government of Canada and the First Nations.

Upper Canada

UpperProvince of Upper CanadaUpper Canadian
The Royal Proclamation continued to govern the cession of indigenous land in British North America, especially Upper Canada and Rupert's Land.
Prior to the creation of Upper Canada in 1791 much land had already been ceded by the First Nations to the Crown in accordance with the Royal Proclamation of 1763.

Nonintercourse Act

Indian Intercourse ActNon-Intercourse ActIndian Trade and Intercourse Act
The first in a series of Indian Intercourse Acts was passed in 1790, prohibiting unregulated trade and travel in Native American lands.
The prohibition on purchases of Indian lands without the approval of the federal government has its origins in the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Confederation Congress Proclamation of 1783.

Section 25 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

section 25sections 25Section Twenty-five of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 is thus mentioned in Section 25 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
The rights to which section 25 refers explicitly include those in the Royal Proclamation of 1763.

Ohio Country

OhioOhio territoryOhio Valley
Pontiac's Rebellion (1763–66) was a war involving Native American tribes, primarily from the Great Lakes region, the Illinois Country, and Ohio Country who were dissatisfied with British postwar policies in the Great Lakes region after the British victory.
In an attempt to improve relations with the Native Americans to encourage trade and avoid conflicts with colonists, George III in his Royal Proclamation of 1763 placed the Ohio Country in what was declared an Indian Reserve, stretching from the Appalachian Mountains west to the Mississippi River and from as far north as Newfoundland to Florida.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
George Washington was given 20000 acre of wild land in the Ohio region for his services in the French and Indian War.
He and other colonists were also angered by the Royal Proclamation of 1763 which banned American settlement west of the Allegheny Mountains and protected the British fur trade.

Illinois Country

Upper LouisianaPays des IllinoisIllinois
Pontiac's Rebellion (1763–66) was a war involving Native American tribes, primarily from the Great Lakes region, the Illinois Country, and Ohio Country who were dissatisfied with British postwar policies in the Great Lakes region after the British victory.
The British Crown declared almost all the land between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River from Florida to Newfoundland a Native American territory called the Indian Reserve following the Royal Proclamation of 1763.

Pontiac's War

Pontiac's RebellionPontiac’s WarAmerican Indian
Pontiac's Rebellion (1763–66) was a war involving Native American tribes, primarily from the Great Lakes region, the Illinois Country, and Ohio Country who were dissatisfied with British postwar policies in the Great Lakes region after the British victory.
On October 7, 1763, the Crown issued the Royal Proclamation of 1763, an effort to reorganize British North America after the Treaty of Paris.

Treaty of Fort Niagara

treaty at Fort NiagaraTreaty of Niagara
Others argue that the Royal Proclamation along with the subsequent Treaty of Niagara, provide for an argument that "discredits the claims of the Crown to exercise sovereignty over First Nations" and affirms Aboriginal "powers of self-determination in, among other things, allocating lands".
This treaty signaled the assembled Indigenous Nations ratification of the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and extended the Silver Covenant Chain of Friendship into the Great Lakes Region of the continent.

Northwest Territory

Old NorthwestTerritory Northwest of the River OhioNorthwest
However, facing armed opposition by Native Americans, the British issued the Proclamation of 1763, which prohibited white colonial settlement west of the Appalachian Mountains.

Sir William Johnson, 1st Baronet

Sir William JohnsonWilliam JohnsonGeneral William Johnson
Advice given by a merchant to the Board of Trade on August 30, 1764, expressed that
Johnson was a proponent of the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which called for tighter imperial control and restraint of westward colonial expansion.

Indian barrier state

Indian buffer statebarrier stateindependent state
Instead, the British imposed the Proclamation of 1763, which was designed to keep the American settlers east of the Appalachian Mountains and physically separate from the main Indian settlements.