Royal Scots

1st Foot1st Regiment of FootThe Royal Scots1st (Royal) Regiment of Foot1st1st RoyalsThe Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment)Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment)Royal ScotRoyal Scots Regiment
The Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment), once known as the Royal Regiment of Foot, was the oldest and most senior infantry regiment of the line of the British Army, having been raised in 1633 during the reign of Charles I of Scotland.wikipedia
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Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of ScotlandRoyal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland3rd Battalion, The Black Watch
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
The regiment consists of a total of seven battalions: one of these was formed by the amalgamation of the Royal Scots and King's Own Scottish Borderers, while the others are each formed from one of the remaining single-battalion regiments of the Scottish Division.

Royal Scots Borderers

The Royal Scots Borderers1st BattalionThe Royal Scots Borderers (1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland)
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
When the Scottish infantry regiments amalgamated to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland on 28 March 2006, the Royal Scots Battalion and the King's Own Scottish Borderers Battalion initially maintained their identities as separate battalions.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
The Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment), once known as the Royal Regiment of Foot, was the oldest and most senior infantry regiment of the line of the British Army, having been raised in 1633 during the reign of Charles I of Scotland.
Although technically the Scots Royal Regiment of Foot was raised in 1633 and is the oldest Regiment of the Line, Scottish and Irish regiments were only allowed to take a rank in the English army on the date of their arrival in England (or the date when they were first placed on the English establishment).

Battle honour

battle honoursUbiquetheatre honour
While awarded a battle honour for 'Tangier' in 1908, the colony and its garrison was evacuated in 1683, the unit being renamed His Majesty's Royal Regiment of Foot in June 1684.
Also awarded the honour was the 2nd Regiment of Foot, or the Tangier Regiment now The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment, the senior English regiment in the Union (after the Royal Scots, the senior Scottish and British Regiment), for their protracted 23-year defence of the Colony of Tangier.

Archibald Douglas, 1st Earl of Ormond

Archibald Douglas, Earl of AngusArchibald Douglas, ''Earl of Angus'' and 1st Earl of OrmondArchibald, Lord Douglas
Sir John was killed in 1636 and succeeded as Colonel by his brother George, then, after his death in 1637, Lord James Douglas; following the custom of the time, the unit became known as the Régiment de Douglas. James died in a skirmish near Douai in 1645 and was replaced by his elder brother Archibald Douglas, Earl of Angus, who remained in Scotland and had little contact with the regiment, other than supplying recruits.
In 1646 made colonel of Régiment de Douglas in France when his brother Lord James Douglas, was killed in action.

Queen's Edinburgh Rifles

1st Queen's Edinburgh Rifle Volunteer Brigade1/4th (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles) Royal Scots1/5th (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles) Battalion, Royal Scots
The 1/4th (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles) and 1/7th mobilised in Edinburgh in August 1914, and were assigned to the 52nd (Lowland) Division.
It later formed two battalions of the Royal Scots, which fought in World War I at Gallipoli, in Palestine and on the Western Front.

Childers Reforms

reforms1881Childers
The regiment was not fundamentally affected by the Cardwell Reforms of the 1870s, which gave it a depot at Glencorse Barracks from 1873, or by the Childers reforms of 1881 – as it already possessed two battalions, there was no need for it to amalgamate with another regiment.

6th Battalion, Royal Scots

1/6th Battalion4th Volunteer Battalion1/6th
The 1/6th had mobilised at the same time and been dispatched to Egypt in 1915 for the Western Frontier Force; it too was withdrawn to France for the Somme.
Beginning as a Volunteer unit formed from teetotallers in the city of Edinburgh in 1867, it later became affiliated to the Royal Scots.

McCrae's Battalion

16th (2nd Edinburgh) (Service) Battalion16th (Service)enlisted together
The 15th was raised in September 1914, the 16th (which came to be known as McCrae's Battalion) in December 1914, and the 17th in February 1915, in Edinburgh.
McCrae's Battalion was the affectionate name given by the people of Edinburgh to the 16th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Scots in World War I, raised from volunteers in 1914 as part of the New Armies called to the Colours by Lord Kitchener.

List of Regiments of Foot

Regiments of FootRegiment of Footcounty regiments
However, as it had become the county regiment of the Edinburgh area, it was retitled The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment), and it took on a militia battalion and seven battalions of Volunteers from the local area.

5th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

5th Division5th Infantry DivisionBritish 5th Infantry Division
After the Second Battle of Ypres, in August 1915, they were transferred to the 51st (Highland) Division as the divisional pioneers, and disbanded in March 1919 at Haddington The 1/9th mobilised at Edinburgh in August 1914, and moved to France in February 1915 with the 27th Division; when this moved to Salonika in November they remained in France, transferring to the 5th Division, and then to Third Army reserve.
3/1st (Royal Scots) Regiment of Foot

Battle of Sedgemoor

Sedgemoorthe battlebattle of Sedgmoor
James II succeeded Charles in 1685, leading to the Monmouth Rebellion and the regiment fought at the decisive Battle of Sedgemoor; a second battalion was raised in March 1686 and posted to Scotland.
The infantry forces included 500 men of the 1st Regiment of Foot (the Royal Scots), known as Dumbarton's Regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Douglas; two battalions of the 1st or King's Royal Regiment of Guards (Grenadier Guards), respectively led by Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and Major Eaton; 600 men of the Second Regiment of Guards (later the Coldstream Guards) under Lieutenant-Colonel Sackville; five companies of the Queen Dowager's or the Tangier Regiment (later 2nd Foot), known as "Kirke's Lambs"; and five companies of the Queen Consort's Regiment (Kings Own Royal Regiment), also known as Trelawny's Regiment, which was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Churchill, Colonel John Churchill's younger brother.

Quintinshill rail disaster

QuintinshillGretna rail disasterrail collision and fire
Whilst the division was mobilising, the 1/7th was involved in the Quintinshill rail crash, which killed 210 officers and men and wounded another 224.
Those killed were mainly Territorial soldiers from the 1/7th (Leith) Battalion, the Royal Scots heading for Gallipoli.

52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division

52nd (Lowland) Division52nd (Lowland)Lowland Division
The 1/4th (Queen's Edinburgh Rifles) and 1/7th mobilised in Edinburgh in August 1914, and were assigned to the 52nd (Lowland) Division.
While moving from Scotland the division suffered the loss of 210 officers and men killed, and another 224 injured in the Quintinshill rail crash, near Gretna, that involved the 1/7th Royal Scots.

3rd Division (United Kingdom)

3rd Division3rd Infantry Division3rd
The 2nd was part of the 3rd Division, one of the first units of the British Expeditionary Force to be sent to France.
1st Royal Regiment

52nd Lowland Volunteers

52nd Lowland52nd Lowland Regiment6 SCOTS
In 1967 this was disbanded and reconstituted as two separate companies, A Company (The Royal Scots) of the 52nd Lowland Volunteers, and A Company (8th/9th Royal Scots) of The Royal Scots and Cameronians Territorials.
The 52nd Lowland Volunteers (52 LOWLAND) was a regiment and is now a battalion in the British Army's Army Reserve or reserve force in the Scottish Lowlands, forming the 6th Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland, also known as 6 SCOTS. Due to its erstwhile association with the 1st Regiment of Foot, it is the senior Territorial line infantry battalion in the British Army.

Siege of Fort Erie

Fort Eriesiegebesieged by the British
It fought in the battles of Sackett's Harbor and Buffalo & Black Rock, as well as the capture of Fort Niagara (1813), the battles of Longwoods, Chippawa, and Lundy's Lane, along with the Siege of Fort Erie and the battle of Cook's Mills (1814).
Colonel Stewart of the Royal Scots was summoned from York to replace him but fell ill with ague, and Colonel Hercules Scott of the 103rd Foot requested permission to relinquish his command of a brigade and revert to command of his regiment.

51st (Highland) Division

51st (Highland) Infantry Division51st Highland DivisionHighland Division
After the Second Battle of Ypres, in August 1915, they were transferred to the 51st (Highland) Division as the divisional pioneers, and disbanded in March 1919 at Haddington The 1/9th mobilised at Edinburgh in August 1914, and moved to France in February 1915 with the 27th Division; when this moved to Salonika in November they remained in France, transferring to the 5th Division, and then to Third Army reserve. They were assigned to the 51st (Highland) Division in March 1916, with whom they fought for two years, then to the 61st (2nd South Midland) Division and 15th (Scottish) Division in 1918.
1/9th (Highlanders) Battalion, Royal Scots

Black Watch

Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)The Black Watch
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
Under a plan devised by Lieutenant General Alistair Irwin and approved by General Sir Mike Jackson, on 16 December 2004, it was announced that the Black Watch was to join with five other Scottish regiments – the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, a single regiment consisting of five regular and two territorial battalions.

Battle of Hong Kong

Hong KongJapanese invasionJapanese invasion of Hong Kong
These fears materialised on 8 December, when the Battle of Hong Kong began a few hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor; after bitter fighting, the garrison surrendered on Christmas Day.
The 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots were assigned to the western sector.

The Museum of the Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment) and the Royal Regiment of Scotland

Royal Scots MuseumRegimental Museum of the Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment)
[[The Museum of the Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment) and the Royal Regiment of Scotland]] is located in Edinburgh Castle.
The Museum of the Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment) and the Royal Regiment of Scotland is a regimental museum displaying the collections of the Royal Scots and the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons)

The HighlandersHighlandersThe Highlanders, 4th Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
''2006: Regiment amalgamated with The Royal Scots, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, The King's Own Scottish Borderers, The Black Watch and The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form The Royal Regiment of Scotland''

King's Own Scottish Borderers

25th Regiment of Foot25th Foot25th
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.

Battle of Fontenoy

Fontenoydefeatbataille de Fontenoy
The 1st saw service in the War of the Austrian Succession at the Battle of Fontenoy (1745), whilst the 2nd was engaged in the Second Jacobite Rising, fighting at the Battle of Prestonpans, Battle of Falkirk and the Battle of Culloden (1746), after which it returned to Ireland.
The first British line, from right to left, was composed of three brigades: first, on the right, the Guards Brigade composed of the 1st, 3rd and 2nd foot guards; second, Ponsonby's brigade of the Royal Scots (1st Foot), Scots Fusiliers (21st Foot), Handaside's (31st Foot); third, Onslow's brigade of Onslow's's (8th Foot), Rothe's/Sempill's (25th Foot), Johnson's (33rd Foot) and Howard's (19th Foot).

15th (Scottish) Infantry Division

15th (Scottish) Division15th Scottish Division15th Division
They were assigned to the 51st (Highland) Division in March 1916, with whom they fought for two years, then to the 61st (2nd South Midland) Division and 15th (Scottish) Division in 1918.
13th (Service) Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)