Royal Society of New South Wales

Learned society based in Sydney, Australia.

- Royal Society of New South Wales

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Painting of Thomas Brisbane by F. Schenck (1850)

Thomas Brisbane

British Army officer, administrator, and astronomer.

British Army officer, administrator, and astronomer.

Painting of Thomas Brisbane by F. Schenck (1850)
Remains of observatory in Parramatta Park, Parramatta, N.S.W.
The Brisbane family vault in Largs

Brisbane's keen interest in science led him to accept the invitation to become the first President of the Philosophical Society of Australasia that later became the Royal Society of New South Wales.

Clarke Medal

Clarke Medal

Clarke Medal

The Clarke Medal is awarded by the Royal Society of New South Wales, the oldest learned society in Australia and the Southern Hemisphere, for distinguished work in the Natural sciences.

R H Mathews

Robert Hamilton Mathews

Australian surveyor and self-taught anthropologist who studied the Aboriginal cultures of Australia, especially those of Victoria, New South Wales and southern Queensland.

Australian surveyor and self-taught anthropologist who studied the Aboriginal cultures of Australia, especially those of Victoria, New South Wales and southern Queensland.

R H Mathews

He was a member of the Royal Society of New South Wales and a corresponding member of the Anthropological Institute of London (later the Royal Anthropological Institute).

Lawrence Hargrave, c. undefined 1890

Lawrence Hargrave

British-born Australian engineer, explorer, astronomer, inventor and aeronautical pioneer.

British-born Australian engineer, explorer, astronomer, inventor and aeronautical pioneer.

Lawrence Hargrave, c. undefined 1890
Hargrave (seated) and Swain demonstrate the manlift kites (labelled A, B, D, & E), sling seat and spring balance in the parkland behind Stanwell Park beach, November 1894
Hargrave lifted sixteen feet from the ground by a tandem of his box kites.
The Hargrave box-kite. It was by kites of this variety, flown in tandem, that the inventor, Hargrave, was lifted sixteen feet from the ground on 12 November 1894.
From 1966 to 1994 the Australian 20 dollar note featured Hargrave on the reverse.

In 1877 he was inspecting the newly developing pearling industry for Parbury Lamb and Co. He returned to Sydney, joined the Royal Society of New South Wales in 1877, and in 1878 became an assistant astronomical observer at Sydney Observatory.

Tannatt William Edgeworth David, 1898, photographer J.H. Newman

Edgeworth David

Welsh Australian geologist and Antarctic explorer.

Welsh Australian geologist and Antarctic explorer.

Tannatt William Edgeworth David, 1898, photographer J.H. Newman
Alistair Mackay, David, and Douglas Mawson at the South Magnetic Pole on 16 January 1909
Coringah, David's home in Hornsby, Sydney, where he lived from 1920

It is awarded by the Royal Society of New South Wales for distinguished contributions by a young scientist under the age of thirty-five for work done mainly in Australia or its territories.

George Lewis Becke

Australian Pacific trader, short story writer and novelist.

Australian Pacific trader, short story writer and novelist.

On 7 September 1910 he was elected a member of the Royal Society of New South Wales.

Portrait of William Branwhite Clark, c. 1875, by J Hubert Newman

William Branwhite Clarke

English geologist and clergyman, active in Australia.

English geologist and clergyman, active in Australia.

Portrait of William Branwhite Clark, c. 1875, by J Hubert Newman
William Branwhite Clarke

Clarke was a trustee of the Australian Museum at Sydney, and an active member of the Royal Society of New South Wales of which he was vice-president 1866–1878; the Clarke Medal awarded by the Society is named in his honour.

Tannatt William Edgeworth David, 1898, photographer J.H. Newman

Edgeworth David Medal

Tannatt William Edgeworth David, 1898, photographer J.H. Newman

The Edgeworth David Medal is awarded annually by the Royal Society of New South Wales for distinguished contributions by a young scientist under the age of 35 years for work done predominantly in Australia or which contributed to the advancement of Australian science.

James Cook Medal

The James Cook Medal is awarded on an occasional basis by the Royal Society of New South Wales for "outstanding contributions to science and human welfare in and for the Southern Hemisphere".

St James's church in Manorbier, Pembrokeshire, is a parish church dating from the 12th century and is a Grade I listed building

Charles Anderson (mineralogist)

Australian mineralogist and palaeontologist.

Australian mineralogist and palaeontologist.

St James's church in Manorbier, Pembrokeshire, is a parish church dating from the 12th century and is a Grade I listed building

He was president of the Royal Society of New South Wales (1924), the Linnean Society of New South Wales (1932), the Anthropological Society of New South Wales (1930 and 1931), and the Geographical Society of New South Wales (1941 and 1942).