A report on Royal charter

Charter granted by King George IV in 1827, establishing King's College, Toronto, now the University of Toronto
Coloured engraving by H. D. Smith, commemorating the grant of a charter to King's College, London in 1829
The Hudson's Bay Company building in Montreal

Formal grant issued by a monarch under royal prerogative as letters patent.

- Royal charter
Charter granted by King George IV in 1827, establishing King's College, Toronto, now the University of Toronto

70 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Fishmongers' Hall, City of London, headquarters of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, founded in 1272, 4th in precedence amongst the livery companies of the City

Livery company

4 links

There are 110 livery companies, comprising London's ancient and modern trade associations and guilds, almost all of which are styled the 'Worshipful Company of...' their respective craft, trade or profession.

There are 110 livery companies, comprising London's ancient and modern trade associations and guilds, almost all of which are styled the 'Worshipful Company of...' their respective craft, trade or profession.

Fishmongers' Hall, City of London, headquarters of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, founded in 1272, 4th in precedence amongst the livery companies of the City
Coat of arms of the Worshipful Company of Grocers, founded in 1345, 2nd in precedence amongst the livery companies of the city: Argent, a chevron gules between nine cloves six in chief and three in base proper
War Memorial to London's liverymen lost in WW1 (on Stationers Hall, west of Paternoster Square)
Grocers' Hall, in Princes Street, is home to the Worshipful Company of Grocers.
The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, whose Hall is pictured, has ranked fourth in the precedence of City livery companies since 1515.
The Gunmakers' Company, 73rd in City precedence, has been based at Proof House, E1 for over 300 years.
Worshipful Company of Innholders: Hinc Spes Affulget (Hence Hope Shines Forth)
Worshipful Company of Dyers: Da Gloriam Deo (Give Glory to God)
Worshipful Company of Skinners: To God Only Be All Glory
Worshipful Company of Cutlers: Pour Parvenir A Bonne Foy (To Succeed Through Good Faith)

Livery companies evolved from London's medieval guilds, becoming corporations under Royal Charter responsible for training in their respective trades, as well as for the regulation of aspects such as wage control, labour conditions and industry standards.

Coat of arms

University of London

4 links

Federal public research university located in London, England, United Kingdom.

Federal public research university located in London, England, United Kingdom.

Coat of arms
General Examination for Women certificate from 1878. These were issued 1869–1878, before women were admitted to degrees of the university.
Yeomanry House in Handel Street is the home of London UOTC. The flag seen flying is the University of London coat of arms.
The Imperial Institute Building in South Kensington, home to the university from 1900 to 1937
Senate House, constructed 1932–1937: the headquarters of the University of London
The University of London coat of arms
The main building of the University of London Union (now rebranded as 'Student Central, London')
Connaught Hall, located in Tavistock Square
Somerset House in 1836. The university had its offices here from 1837 to 1870.
King William IV, who granted the University of London its original royal charter in 1836.
An illustration of 6 Burlington Gardens, home to the university administration from 1870 to 1900.
Mahatma Gandhi, Father of the Nation for India
Nelson Mandela (LLB; Hon. DSc Econ), Father of the Nation for South Africa
Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Father of the Nation for Pakistan{{efn|Muhammad Ali Jinnah graduated from Inns of Court School of Law, which is now City Law School. In 2016, City University London became one of the constituent college of the University of London as City, University of London.}}
John Snow (MB, MD), founder of epidemiology
John Hunter, founder of modern surgery
Florence Nightingale, founder of modern nursing
Achim Steiner (MA 1985), Administrator of the UNDP
Tedros Adhanom (MSc 1992), 8th Director-General of the World Health Organization
Kaushik Basu (MSc 1974, PhD 1976), 11th Chief Economist of the World Bank
Jeremy Heywood (MSc 1986), 11th Cabinet Secretary
Margrethe II (Hon. LLD), Queen of Denmark
Aung San Suu Kyi (MPhil 1988), 1st State Counsellor of Myanmar
V. K. Krishna Menon (MSc, MA), 3rd Defence Minister of India
Fred Mulley (BSc), former British Secretary of State for Defence
Leszek Borysiewicz (PhD 1986){{efn|Imperial College London was a constituent college of University of London from years 1908 to 2007. All degrees during this time was solely issued by the federal university. Imperial College left UoL in 2007 and after which is now issuing its own degree in its name.}}, 345th Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge
Elton John (Hon. DMus 2002), English singer and composer.
Mick Jagger, English singer and composer.
George Soros (BSc 1951, MSc 1954), billionaire investor and philanthropist.
Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall.{{efn|Attended; did not graduate.}}
Meir Shamgar, 7th Chief Justice of Supreme Court of Israel.
Sudhi Das (LLB 1918), 5th Chief Justice of India.
George V (LLD 1903), King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India <ref name="Foundation UOL">{{cite web|url=https://london.ac.uk/about-us/how-university-run/foundation-day|title=Foundation Day of University of London}}</ref>
Edward VIII (MCom 1921, DSc 1921), King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India
Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother (DLitt 1937), Queen consort of the United Kingdom
Queen Elizabeth II (BMus 1946, LLD 1951), Queen of the United Kingdom and
Princess Margaret (DMus 1957),<ref name="Queen Mother Official Biography">{{cite book|last=Shawcross|first=William|title =Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother: The Official Biography|date=2 October 2009| publisher=Pan Macmillan, 2009| isbn=9780230748101}}</ref> Member of British royal family
Winston Churchill (LLD 1948), Prime Minister of the United Kingdom{{efn|The University of London awarded honorary doctorate degree to Winston Churchill at the Foundation Day ceremony on 18 November 1948.}}
Albert Einstein (1936), Theoretical physicist and Recipient of Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921
René Cassin (1969), Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1968
Amartya Sen (DSc Econ 2000), Recipient of Nobel Prize in Economics 1998
Lars Ahlfors (1978), Finnish mathematician Recipient of Fields Medal in 1936.<ref name="Lars Ahlfors UoL">{{cite web|title=Lars Ahlfors (1907-1996)|url=http://www.math.harvard.edu/history/ahlfors/|work=Harvard University|access-date=31 May 2018}}</ref><ref name="Lars Ahlfors UoL2">{{cite web|title=Lars Valerian Ahlfors|url=http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/Biographies/Ahlfors.html|work=University of St Andrews|access-date=31 May 2018}}</ref>
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1941), 32nd President of the United States

The university was established by royal charter in 1836 as a degree-awarding examination board for students holding certificates from University College London and King's College London and "other such other Institutions, corporate or unincorporated, as shall be established for the purpose of Education, whether within the Metropolis or elsewhere within our United Kingdom".

Coat of arms

Durham University

3 links

Coat of arms
William van Mildert, Bishop of Durham and one of the founders of the university
An examination taking place in Cosin's Library, 1842
Durham Castle (gatehouse pictured) houses University College, making it one of the oldest buildings currently being used to house a university in the world
St Chad's College, one of the two independent colleges
The lawn at St Mary's College, the first of the Hill colleges
School of Government and International Affairs
The Ogden Centre for Fundamental Physics, next to the Department of Physics
Hatfield College, one of the five colleges along the Bailey
Old Elvet is the home of a number of departments
The Palatine Centre on the Mountjoy Campus, home of the university's administration
Sheraton Park, site of a former teacher training college and home to Ustinov College since 2017
South (left) and John Snow (right) colleges on the Mount Oswald site
Wolfson Research Institute at the Queen's Campus
The original university library, now known as the Palace Green Library (centre), and the School of Music (left)
St Cuthbert Gospel, an 8th-century gospel book
The Old Fulling Mill, original home of the University Museum in 1833, on the bank of the River Wear below Durham Cathedral
Archdeacon Charles Thorp, founder and first Warden of Durham
The university's graduation ceremonies take place in Durham Cathedral with receptions on Palace Green
Bill Bryson (Chancellor 2005–2012) in the academic dress of Chancellor of Durham University
Cosin's Hall, home to the Institute of Advanced Study
The Dawson Building houses the departments of Archaeology and Anthropology
Durham Law School
The Great Hall at University College – communal dining is traditional at most Durham colleges
The Durham Union Society is the university's largest student society
Dunelm House, home of the Durham Students' Union
University College Boat Club and Newcastle University racing at Durham Regatta
The Racecourse is one of the university's main sites for sporting facilities
Durham University Botanic Garden
General Sir Richard Dannatt, Chief of the General Staff
Tim Smit, founder of the Eden Project
Sir Harold Evans, Editor at Large, Reuters
Jonathan Edwards, Van Mildert College, Physics

Durham University (legally the University of Durham) is a collegiate public research university in Durham, England, founded by an Act of Parliament in 1832 and incorporated by royal charter in 1837.

The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827–1828 (now the UCL Main Building)

University College London

3 links

Public research university in London, United Kingdom.

Public research university in London, United Kingdom.

The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827–1828 (now the UCL Main Building)
Henry Tonks' 1923 mural The Four Founders of UCL
William Ramsay is regarded as the "father of noble gases".
The UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies building, which was opened in 2005
The Torrens Building in Adelaide, South Australia, which housed the UCL School of Energy and Resources
New Student Centre on Gordon Street
Wilkins Building and Main Quad
The Rockefeller Building on University Street, one of UCL's largest premises
Drayton House, which houses the Department of Economics
The UCL School of Pharmacy building
The Faculty of Engineering Sciences building
The Bedford Way building, home to the UCL Institute of Education and the Departments of Geography, Psychology and Language
The main building of University College Hospital
The Francis Crick Institute building
John O'Keefe, neuroscientist and the latest (2014) UCL faculty member to win a Nobel Prize (in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of place cells)
The Cruciform Building on Gower Street houses the preclinical facilities of the UCL Medical School
Bentham House, the main building of the UCL Faculty of Laws
The Donaldson Reading Room, part of UCL's Main Library
The UCL Institute of Education's Newsam Library, the largest education library in Europe
The Flaxman Gallery
Performers at the 2014 UCL summer ball
Students' union building on Gordon Street
A UCL player attacks in his team's 2014 Varsity victory. UCL's traditional rivalry with King's College is nowadays most noticeable at the annual varsity rugby game
Frances Gardner House
William Bayliss, co-discoverer of Secretin, the first identified hormone
Former UCL logo, in use until 2005
UCL "coat of arms"
UCL scarf colours
Mahatma Gandhi{{efn|Attended; did not graduate.}}
Alexander Graham Bell{{efn|Attended; did not graduate.}}
Francis Crick
John Stuart Mill
A. E. Housman
William Stanley Jevons
Marie Stopes
Rabindranath Tagore{{efn|Attended; did not graduate.}}
Gustav Holst
Joseph Lister
Otto Hahn
Peter Higgs
Charles K. Kao
Demis Hassabis
Christopher Nolan
Chris Martin
Ricky Gervais
Itō Hirobumi
Jomo Kenyatta
Junichiro Koizumi
Tomáš G. Masaryk
Kwame Nkrumah

In 1836, London University was incorporated by royal charter under the name University College, London.

Coat of arms

Columbia University

3 links

Private Ivy League research university in New York City.

Private Ivy League research university in New York City.

Coat of arms
Coat of arms
Samuel Johnson, the first president of Columbia
King's College Hall, 1790
Crop of 1797 Taylor map of NYC showing "The College" at its Park Place (then Robinson Street) location. Note earlier location, Trinity Church, lower left.
The Gothic Revival library and law school buildings on the Madison Avenue campus
Low Memorial Library, c. 1900
Alma Mater
College Walk
Butler Library
Union Theological Seminary
Lamont Campus entrance in Palisades, New York
The entrance to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Washington Heights
Access to Columbia is enhanced by the 116th Street–Columbia University subway station on the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line.
Van Amringe Quadrangle and Memorial
Low Memorial Library
The Barnard College Class of 1913 processes down the steps of Low Library.
Havemeyer Hall, a National Historic Chemical Landmark, where deuterium was discovered in 1931. Research conducted in Havemeyer has led to at least seven Nobel Prizes.
President Lee Bollinger presents the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction to Jeffrey Eugenides.
Copies of the Columbia Daily Spectator being sold during the 1962–63 New York City newspaper strike
The Art Deco cover of the November 1931 edition of the Jester, celebrating the opening of the George Washington Bridge
Pupin Hall, the physics building, showing the rooftop Rutherfurd Observatory
200x200px
257x257px
World Leaders Forum at Low Memorial Library
Earl Hall was listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its role in serving as a venue for meetings and dances of the Columbia Queer Alliance.
The Columbia University Marching Band in 2018
Alexander Hamilton: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; first United States Secretary of the Treasury — King's College
John Jay: Founding Father of the United States; author of The Federalist Papers; first Chief Justice of the United States; second Governor of New York — King's College
Robert R. Livingston: Founding Father of the United States; drafter of the Declaration of Independence; first United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs — King's College
Gouverneur Morris: Founding Father of the United States; author of the United States Constitution; United States Senator from New York — King's College
DeWitt Clinton: United States Senator from New York; sixth Governor of New York; responsible for construction of Erie Canal — Columbia College
Barack Obama: 44th President of the United States; United States Senator from Illinois; Nobel laureate — Columbia College
Franklin D. Roosevelt: 32nd President of the United States; 44th Governor of New York — Columbia Law School
Theodore Roosevelt: 26th President of the United States; 25th Vice President of the United States; 33rd Governor of New York; Nobel laureate – Columbia Law School
Wellington Koo: acting President of the Republic of China; judge of the International Court of Justice — Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
B. R. Ambedkar: Founding Father of India; architect of the Constitution of India; First Minister of Law and Justice — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States — Columbia Law School
Neil Gorsuch: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States — Columbia College
Charles Evans Hughes: 11th Chief Justice of the United States; 44th United States Secretary of State; 35th Governor of New York — Columbia Law School
Harlan Fiske Stone: 12th Chief Justice of the United States; 52nd United States Attorney General — Columbia Law School
William Barr: 77th and 85th United States Attorney General – Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Hamilton Fish: 26th United States Secretary of State; United States Senator from New York; 16th Governor of New York — Columbia College
Madeleine Albright: 64th United States Secretary of State; first female Secretary of State — School of International and Public Affairs
Frances Perkins: fourth United States Secretary of Labor; first female member of any U.S. Cabinet — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Robert A. Millikan: Nobel laureate; measured the elementary electric charge — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Isidor Isaac Rabi: Nobel Laureate; discovered nuclear magnetic resonance — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Julian S. Schwinger: Nobel laureate; pioneer of quantum field theory — Columbia College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Milton Friedman: Nobel laureate, leading member of the Chicago school of economics — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Simon Kuznets: Nobel laureate; invented concept of GDP; Milton Friedman's doctoral advisor — School of General Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Alan Greenspan: 13th Chair of the Federal Reserve — Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Warren Buffett: CEO of Berkshire Hathaway; one of the world's wealthiest people — Columbia Business School
Herman Hollerith: inventor; co-founder of IBM – School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Robert Kraft: billionaire; owner of the New England Patriots; chairman and CEO of the Kraft Group — Columbia College
Richard Rodgers: legendary Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony award-winning composer; Pulitzer Prize winner — Columbia College
Langston Hughes: Harlem Renaissance poet, novelist, and playwright — School of Engineering and Applied Science
Zora Neale Hurston: Harlem Renaissance author, anthropologist, and filmmaker — Barnard College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Allen Ginsberg: poet; founder of the Beat Generation — Columbia College
Jack Kerouac: poet; founder of the Beat Generation — Columbia College
Isaac Asimov: science fiction writer; biochemist — School of General Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
J. D. Salinger: novelist, The Catcher in the Rye — School of General Studies
Amelia Earhart: first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean — School of General Studies
Jake Gyllenhaal: actor and film producer — Columbia College
Zbigniew Brzezinski
Sonia Sotomayor
Kimberlé Crenshaw
Lee Bollinger
Franz Boas
Margaret Mead
Edward Sapir
John Dewey
Charles A. Beard
Max Horkheimer
Herbert Marcuse
Edward Said
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Orhan Pamuk
Edwin Howard Armstrong
Enrico Fermi
Chien-Shiung Wu
Tsung-Dao Lee
Jack Steinberger
Joachim Frank
Joseph Stiglitz
Jeffrey Sachs
Robert Mundell
Thomas Hunt Morgan
Eric Kandel
Richard Axel
Andrei Okounkov

Columbia was established by royal charter under George II of Great Britain.

Coat of arms

McGill University

3 links

English-language public research university located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

English-language public research university located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Coat of arms
James McGill, the original benefactor of McGill University.
The first Principal of McGill College, The Rt. Rev. Dr. George Mountain
Sir John William Dawson, Principal of McGill University, 1855–1893
The Arts Building, completed in 1843 and designed by John Ostell, is the oldest building on campus
The interior of the Redpath Museum
McGill University and Mount Royal, 1906, Panoramic Photo Company
The Second University Company prior to their departure for France
Stained Glass Great War Memorial entrance to the Blackader-Lauterman Library of Architecture and Art
Lower campus at sunset
The recently renovated McTavish Street is a critical artery connecting the lower campus to the upper campus
Roddick Gates act as the main entrance to the downtown campus
Built in 1892, Old Chancellor Day Hall houses the Faculty of Law
The "McGill Ghetto"
A hockey game on campus in 1884, just seven years after McGill students wrote the then-new game's first rule book, with the Arts Building, Redpath Museum, and Morrice Hall (then the Presbyterian College) visible
Solin Hall, situated in Saint-Henri near Lionel-Groulx station, serves as an off-campus apartment-style dorm.
Macdonald Campus under construction in 1906
The Macdonald Campus coat of arms
The newly built McGill University Health Centre at the Glen Site
Parc Rutherford at night. The Genome Building (left), Wong Building (middle), and McTavish Reservoir (right) are seen in the background.
McGill's coat of arms
The laboratory of Rutherford, early 20th century
Radon, discovered at McGill by physicist Ernest Rutherford
The Falcon, a statue outside of the Humanities and Social Sciences Library, part of the McLennan–Redpath Library Complex
Elizabeth Wirth Music Building, also a library, sits adjacent to the old Strathcona Music Building
PhD candidates march at Commencement in McGill's distinctive scarlet regalia.
Opening of the Student Union building, 1906
McGill's Molson Stadium
A hockey match at McGill in 1901
McGill Hockey Team, 1904
McGill announces new name for men's varsity sports teams
The Queen's-McGill Challenge Blade
The Lorne Gales Trophy
3rd prime minister of Canada Sir John Abbott (BCL, 1847).
7th prime minister of Canada Sir Wilfrid Laurier (BCL, 1864).
Inventor of the game of basketball James Naismith (BA, 1887).
Co-inventor of the charge-coupled device and Nobel prize laureate in Physics Willard Boyle (BSc, 1947; MSc 1948; PhD 1950).
Emmy Award winner known for his portrayal of Captain Kirk in the Star Trek franchise William Shatner (BComm, 1952).
Balzan Prize winner, referred to as "the founder of neuropsychology" Brenda Milner (PhD, 1952)
Grammy Award winner and poet Leonard Cohen (BA, 1955).
6th President of Latvia Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga (PhD, 1965).
48th Prime Minister of Egypt Ahmed Nazif (PhD, 1983).
Former astronaut and 29th governor general of Canada Julie Payette (BEng, 1986).
Turing Award winner Yoshua Bengio (BEng, 1986; MSc, 1988; PhD, 1991).
The current and 23rd prime minister of Canada Justin Trudeau (BA, 1994).
Former international president of Médecins Sans Frontières Joanne Liu (MDCM, 1991; IMHL, 2014).

Founded in 1821 by royal charter granted by King George IV, the university bears the name of James McGill, a Scottish merchant whose bequest in 1813 formed the university's precursor, University of McGill College (or simply, McGill College); the name was officially changed to McGill University in 1885.

University of Edinburgh

2 links

Public research university in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Public research university in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Interior dome of the McEwan Hall after restoration in 2017
Robert Rollock, Regent (1583–1586) and first principal (1586–1599) of the University of Edinburgh
Main buildings of King James' College in 1647, lying in a double courtyard on the lower left
The east facade of Old College facing onto South Bridge, as built in 1827. A dome similar to Adam's original design was added in 1887 by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson.
Plaque commemorating the Edinburgh Seven at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
Buildings of the old Medical School at Teviot Place, photographed in the late 19th century
Exterior of the McEwan Hall
Teviot Row House, drawn by architect Sydney Mitchell in 1888
Facade of New College facing onto The Mound in 1910
Plaque honouring the Polish School of Medicine at the old Medical School
Spiral staircase inside of the Informatics Forum
The Lady Lawson Street entrance of Edinburgh College of Art
Interior courtyard of Old College
The Main Library viewed from The Meadows
Pollock Halls of Residence seen from Arthur's Seat
The view of the Holyrood campus
Princess Anne, current chancellor of the University of Edinburgh
Hugh Blair, first Regius Professor of Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres appointed by King George III
Members of the medical faculty at Edinburgh in the first half of the 19th century
Old Surgical Hospital in Drummond Street, once part of the Royal Infirmary, today houses the university's Institute of Geography
Edinburgh graduation ceremony in the McEwan Hall
Playfair Library Hall in Old College
The former principal Sir Timothy O'Shea signed an agreement with Peking University in 2012
The Pleasance, one of EUSA's main buildings, is a theatre, bar, sports and recreation complex
Edinburgh University Music Society, performing Mahler in Greyfriars Kirk
The student-run Bedlam Theatre, home to the Edinburgh University Theatre Company
Peter Higgs, faculty at Edinburgh since 1960 and Emeritus Professor after retiring in 1996, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2013.
Gordon Brown, former Prime Minister and consecutive 10-year-long Chancellor of the Exchequer, is an alumnus (MA '72, PhD '82) and former rector of the university.
Appleton Tower
Business School
Centre for Regenerative Medicine
Erskine Williamson Building, King's Buildings
thumb|Informatics Forum, School of Informatics
Roslin Institute
Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, School of Medicine
Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies
Robert Adam, neoclassical architect
J. M. Barrie, novelist and playwright
James Barry, surgeon
Thomas Bayes, statistician
Joseph Black, physicist and chemist
Richard Bright, physician, father of nephrology
Robert Brown, botanist, discovered Brownian motion
Thomas Carlyle, historian and satirist
Thomas Chalmers, political economist
Charles Darwin, naturalist and biologist
Adam Ferguson, philosopher and historian
David Hume, philosopher
James Hutton, geologist, father of modern geology
James Clerk Maxwell, mathematician and physicist
Richard Owen, biologist, coined the term dinosaur
Macquorn Rankine, engineer, founding contributor to thermodynamics
Benjamin Rush, signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence
Walter Scott, novelist and poet
James Young Simpson, physician
Robert Louis Stevenson, novelist and poet
Dugald Stewart, philosopher and mathematician
James Wilson, Founding Father of the United States
John Witherspoon, Founding Father of the United States
Thomas Young, polymath
New College
Edinburgh University Mountaineering Club at the cairn on Ciste Dhubh, 1964
Max Born, Tait Professor of Natural Philosophy at Edinburgh from 1936 to 1953, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954.
Business School

Granted a royal charter by King James VI in 1582 and officially opened in 1583, it is one of Scotland's four ancient universities and the sixth-oldest university in continuous operation in the English-speaking world.

Until the 19th century, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster.

City status in the United Kingdom

2 links

Granted by the monarch of the United Kingdom to a select group of communities.

Granted by the monarch of the United Kingdom to a select group of communities.

Until the 19th century, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster.
Birmingham was the first English town without an Anglican cathedral to be granted city status. Birmingham City Council meets at the Council House.

Scotland had no cities by royal charter or letters patent before 1889.

Coat of arms

King's College London

3 links

Public research university located in London, England.

Public research university located in London, England.

Coat of arms
The patron of King's College London, King George IV, shown in a portrait by Sir Thomas Lawrence
Somerset House - showing the East Wing which is a part of the Strand Campus of King's College London.
King's College London in 1831, as engraved by J. C. Carter
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington and then prime minister, fought a duel against the Earl of Winchilsea in 1829 over the Duke's support for the rights of Irish Catholics and the independence of the newly established King's College London
William Otter (1831–36), the first Principal of King's College London
The Embankment terrace entrance to the Strand Campus overlooking the River Thames, originally designed by Sir William Chambers, was completed by Sir Robert Smirke in 1835
Evacuated King's College London students at the University of Bristol during the Second World War
The Maughan Library. Following a £35m renovation, it is the largest new university library in the United Kingdom since World War II
Bush House, Strand Campus
The King's Building in the Strand Quadrangle
The Grade I listed King's College London Chapel on the Strand Campus seen today was redesigned in 1864 by Sir George Gilbert Scott
Henriette Raphael House, Guy's Campus
The Franklin-Wilkins Building, Waterloo Campus
A view of St Thomas' Hospital at St Thomas' Campus, from the Thames
King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill Campus
The Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at the Denmark Hill Campus enjoys a long history with the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
Principal from 1883 to 1897, Henry Wace
Life-size wax sculpture of Virginia Woolf, a writer and alumna of King's
The Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine is located at four campuses including the Guy's Campus
Florence Nightingale and her class of nurses
King's Business School is based in Bush House, Aldwych in Central London
King's coat of arms used from 1829 to 1985
Entrance and coat of arms of the 19th century King's Building, Strand Campus
Prize-giving day in 1841
King's graduands with academic dress designed by Vivienne Westwood
The Maughan Library courtyard
The Round Reading Room at the Maughan Library
Opening of the King George III Museum by Albert, Prince Consort on 1 July 1843
A papier-mâché version of Reggie the Lion, the mascot of KCLSU, outside the Great Hall in King's Strand Campus
Logo of the King's College London Students' Union (KCLSU)
The annual Macadam Cup
King's traditional rivalry with UCL is nowadays most noted at the yearly varsity rugby match
The Great Dover Street halls of residence
200px
155px
155px
Somerset House adjacent to King's College London's East Wing has a yearly ice skating rink from November to January
Romantic poet John Keats (Medicine, 1816)
Polymath Sir Francis Galton (Medicine, 1839)
Dramatist Sir W. S. Gilbert of Gilbert and Sullivan (BA, 1856)
1929 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine laureate Sir Frederick Hopkins (Medicine, 1894)
1951 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine laureate Max Theiler (Medicine)
Science fiction writer Sir Arthur C. Clarke (BSc, 1948)
Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey (BD, 1962)
Queen bassist John Deacon (BSc, 1971)
Impressionist and comedian Rory Bremner (BA, 1984)
Writer and philosopher Alain de Botton (MPhil, 1992)
Sir Charles Lyell
Sir Charles Wheatstone
Robert Bentley Todd
James Clerk Maxwell
Florence Nightingale
Joseph Lister
Charles Barkla
Sir Charles Sherrington
Sir Edward Appleton
Sir Owen Richardson
Maurice Wilkins
Mario Vargas Llosa
John Ellis

King's was established by royal charter in 1829 under the patronage of King George IV and the Duke of Wellington.

Coat of arms of the University of Toronto

University of Toronto

3 links

Public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, located on the grounds that surround Queen's Park.

Public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, located on the grounds that surround Queen's Park.

Coat of arms of the University of Toronto
Charter granted by King George IV in 1827, establishing King's College.
Painting of University College, 1859.
A Sopwith Camel aircraft rests on the Front Campus lawn in 1918.
Soldiers' Tower, a memorial to alumni fallen in the World Wars, contains a 51-bell carillon.
The neoclassical Convocation Hall is characterized by its domed roof and Ionic-pillared rotunda.
Old Vic, the main building of Victoria College, typifies the Richardsonian Romanesque style.
The Sandford Fleming Building contains offices of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.
The Munk School of Global Affairs encompasses programs and research institutes for international relations.
The Naylor Building contains offices for the university's Department of Medicine.
Robarts Library, a Brutalist structure, houses the university's main collection for humanities and social sciences.
The AeroVelo Atlas won the Sikorsky Human Powered Helicopter Competition in 2013.
The discovery of stem cells by McCulloch and Till is the basis for all modern stem cell research.
The Donnelly Centre is part of the Discovery District, one of the world's largest biotechnology research clusters.
Varsity Stadium
The University of Toronto Rowing Club trains in Toronto Harbour for the 1924 Summer Olympics. The team won silver for Canada.
Generations of students have attended speeches, debates and concerts at Hart House.
Sunlight fills Knox College Chapel during a Christmas concert of the engineering faculty's Skule Choir.
21 Sussex Court holds office space for several student organizations, like The Varsity newspaper.
Teefy House, a residence hall of St. Michael's College, is home to female first-year undergraduate students.
William Lyon Mackenzie King, the longest-serving Prime Minister in Canadian history with over 21 years in office, BA, MA
Lester B. Pearson, Canadian Prime Minister and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1957, BA
Paul Martin, 21st Canadian Prime Minister, LLB
John Kenneth Galbraith, noted economist and a leading proponent of 20th-century American liberalism, B.Sc.(Agr.)
John Charles Fields, mathematician and the founder of the prestigious Fields Medal
Harold Innis, professor of political economy, helped develop the staples thesis and the Toronto School of communication theory
Frederick Banting, Nobel Laureate in Medicine and the first person to use insulin on humans, MD
Roberta Bondar, CSA astronaut and the first Canadian female in space, PhD
Julie Payette, CSA astronaut and the 29th Governor General of Canada, MASc
Jennie Smillie Robertson, First female surgeon in Canada, MD

It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in Upper Canada.