Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom

Royal Armsroyal coat of armsRoyal Arms of the United Kingdomcoat of arms of the United Kingdomcoat of armsRoyal Shieldarmsarms of the sovereign in right of the United KingdomBritish coat of armsarms of the United Kingdom
The royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, or the Royal Arms for short, is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
734 Related Articles

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch of the United Kingdom.
symbol_type = Royal coat of arms

St Edward's Crown

Crown of St EdwardCrownCrown of Saint Edward
The crest is a statant guardant lion wearing the St Edward's Crown, himself on another representation of that crown.
A stylised image of this crown is used on coats of arms, badges, logos and various other insignia in the Commonwealth realms to symbolise the royal authority of Queen Elizabeth II.

Dieu et mon droit

This armorial achievement comprises the motto, in French, of English monarchs, Dieu et mon Droit (God and my Right), which has descended to the present royal family as well as the Garter circlet which surrounds the shield, inscribed with the Order's motto, in French, Honi soit qui mal y pense (Shame on him who thinks evil).
It appears on a scroll beneath the shield of the version of the coat of arms of the United Kingdom used outside Scotland.

Banner of arms

banner formbanner of the armsbanner
The arms in banner form serve as basis for the monarch's official flag, known as the Royal Standard.

Royal Standard of the United Kingdom

Royal StandardBritish royal standardstandard
The arms in banner form serve as basis for the monarch's official flag, known as the Royal Standard.
Although almost universally called a standard, such flags when used in the United Kingdom are banners of arms, as they comprise the shield of the Royal Arms.

Honi soit qui mal y pense

Hony soit qui maly pence
This armorial achievement comprises the motto, in French, of English monarchs, Dieu et mon Droit (God and my Right), which has descended to the present royal family as well as the Garter circlet which surrounds the shield, inscribed with the Order's motto, in French, Honi soit qui mal y pense (Shame on him who thinks evil).
The latter usage can also be seen in the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, with the motto of the royal arms, Dieu et mon droit, being displayed on a scroll beneath the shield.

Shamrock

shamrocksthe plant
In the greenery below, a thistle, Tudor rose and shamrock are depicted, representing Scotland, England and Ireland respectively.
Since the 1800 Acts of Union between Britain and Ireland the shamrock was incorporated into the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom, depicted growing from a single stem alongside the rose of England, and the thistle of Scotland to symbolise the unity of the three kingdoms.

One pound (British coin)

one pound coinÂŁ1 coinpound coin
The Royal Arms have regularly appeared on the coinage produced by the Royal Mint including, for example, from 1663, the Guinea and, from 1983, the British one pound coin.
The designs for the 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p and 50p coins depict sections of the Royal Shield that form the whole shield when placed together.

In My Defens God Me Defend

In Defens
The motto, in Scots, appears above the crest, in the tradition of Scottish heraldry, and is an abbreviated form of the full motto: In My Defens God Me Defend.
In my defens God me defend is the motto of both the Royal coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland and Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland.

Order of the Thistle

KTKnight of the ThistleMost Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle
The coat also features both the motto Nemo me impune lacessit (No one wounds (touches) me with impunity) and, surrounding the shield, the collar of the Order of the Thistle.
The same motto appears on the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom for use in Scotland and some pound coins, and is also the motto of the Royal Regiment of Scotland, Scots Guards, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada and Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

Honours of Scotland

Regalia of ScotlandScottish Crown JewelsScottish regalia
The crest atop the Crown of Scotland is a red lion, seated and forward facing, itself wearing the Crown of Scotland and holding the two remaining elements of the Honours of Scotland, namely the Sword of State and the Sceptre of Scotland.
They also appear on the crest of the royal coat of arms of Scotland and on the Scottish version of the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, where the red lion of the King of Scots is depicted holding the sword and sceptre and wearing the crown.

Nemo me impune lacessit

Nemo me impune lacessetone possible source
The coat also features both the motto Nemo me impune lacessit (No one wounds (touches) me with impunity) and, surrounding the shield, the collar of the Order of the Thistle.
The motto also appears, in conjunction with the collar of the Order of the Thistle, in later versions of the Royal coat of arms of the Kingdom of Scotland and subsequently in the version of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom used in Scotland.

The Times

TimesTimes Newspapers LtdTimes Online
The widely sold British newspaper The Times uses the Hanoverian Royal Arms as a logo, whereas its sister publication, The Sunday Times, displays the current Royal Arms.
Also in 1966, the Royal Arms, which had been a feature of the newspaper's masthead since its inception, was abandoned.

Coat of arms of the Prince of Wales

coat of arms as the Prince of Walescoat of armscoat of arms as Prince of Wales
In the 20th century, the arms of the principality of Wales were added as an inescutcheon to the coat of arms of the Prince of Wales, and a banner of those arms with a green inescutcheon bearing the prince's crown is flown as his personal standard in Wales.
The history of the coat of arms is closely linked with that of the Royal coat of arms of England and the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom.

Compartment (heraldry)

compartmentcompartmentsgrassy mount
On the compartment are a number of thistles, Scotland's national flower.
If the compartment is mentioned in the blazon it forms part of the grant and is an integral part of the arms e.g. the current royal arms of the United Kingdom are required to have a compartment with plant badges.

Unicorn

unicornsAlicornThe Unicorn
The dexter supporter is a likewise crowned English lion; the sinister, a Scottish unicorn.
Two unicorns supported the royal arms of the King of Scots, and since the 1707 union of England and Scotland, the royal arms of the United Kingdom have been supported by a unicorn along with an English lion.

Supporter

supporterssupportedsupporting
The dexter supporter is a likewise crowned English lion; the sinister, a Scottish unicorn.
Often, as in other elements of heraldry, these can have local significance, such as the fisherman and the tin miner granted to Cornwall County Council, or a historical link; such as the lion of England and unicorn of Scotland in the two variations of the Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom.

Tudor rose

RoseUnion Rosecoloured red and white
In the greenery below, a thistle, Tudor rose and shamrock are depicted, representing Scotland, England and Ireland respectively.
It features in the design of the British Twenty Pence coin minted between 1982 and 2008, and in the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom.

Royal Arms of Scotland

Scotlandfor Scotlandroyal coat of arms of Scotland
According to legend a free unicorn was considered a very dangerous beast; therefore the heraldic unicorn is chained, as were both supporting unicorns in the royal coat of arms of Scotland.
Poetically described as "the ruddy lion ramping in his field of tressured gold", the arms are still widely used today as a symbol of Scotland, and are quartered in the royal arms of Queen Elizabeth II along with the arms of England and Ireland.

Order of the Garter

KGKnight of the GarterGarter
This armorial achievement comprises the motto, in French, of English monarchs, Dieu et mon Droit (God and my Right), which has descended to the present royal family as well as the Garter circlet which surrounds the shield, inscribed with the Order's motto, in French, Honi soit qui mal y pense (Shame on him who thinks evil).
The mantles for the prelate and chancellor are dark blue like those of the members (as a member, the chancellor wears a member's mantle), but the mantles for the other officers are dark red. All mantles are embroidered with a heraldic shield of St George's Cross. For Garter ceremonies, Garter Principal King of Arms wears this red mantle rather than the tabard of the royal arms worn for other State ceremonial occasions.

Coat of arms of Ireland

Irelandfor Irelandarms of Ireland
The crest of the Kingdom of Ireland (on a wreath Or and Azure, a tower triple-towered of the First, from the portal a hart springing Argent attired and unguled Or) has had little or no official use since the union.
When the crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland were united in 1603, they were integrated into the unified royal coat of arms of kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland.

Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland

ScotlandScottish affairsoffice of Secretary of State for Scotland
In Scotland, there exists a separate version of the Royal Arms, a variant of which is used by the Scotland Office.

Great Seal of the Realm

Great SealGreat Seal of Englandseal
On the reverse are the full royal arms, including crest, mantling and supporters.

Fleur-de-lis

fleur-de-lysfleurs-de-lisfleur de lys
In the standard variant used outside of Scotland, the shield is quartered, depicting in the first and fourth quarters the three passant guardant lions of England; in the second, the rampant lion and double tressure flory-counterflory of Scotland; and in the third, a harp for Ireland.
In 1328, King Edward III of England inherited a claim to the crown of France, and in about 1340 he quartered France Ancient with the arms of Plantagenet, as "arms of pretence".

Great Seal of the Irish Free State

Great SealGreat Seal of Saorstát Éireannits own diplomatic seals
When the Irish Free State established its own diplomatic seals in the 1930s, the royal arms appearing on them varied from those on their UK equivalents by having the Irish arms in two quarters and the English arms in one.
The external seal, designed by Percy Metcalfe, had on its reverse the same harp image as the 1925 "internal" seal, and on its obverse the same image of the monarch enthroned as the British Great Seal of the Realm, except for the quartered royal arms above the throne, where the English arms in first and fourth quarters were switched with the Irish arms in third quarter.