Royal court

courtimperial courtcourtsnoble courtcourtlyroyal courtsFrench courtllysCourt (royal)court life
For alternative meanings of the word "court", see Court (disambiguation).wikipedia
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Courtier

courtierscourtcourtly
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court.
A courtier is a person who is often in attendance at the court of a monarch or other royal personage.

Monarchy

kingdommonarchieskingdoms
A court is an extended royal household in a monarchy, including all those who regularly attend on a monarch, or another central figure.
Aristocrats, though not inherent to monarchies, often serve as the pool of persons to draw the monarch from and fill the constituting institutions (e.g. diet and court), giving many monarchies oligarchic elements.

Camarilla

KamarillaPrussian Camarilla
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court.
Usually, they do not hold any office or have any official authority at the royal court but influence their ruler behind the scenes.

Prince étranger

Foreign Princeprinces étrangersprincely
Foreign princes and foreign nobility in exile may also seek refuge at a court.
This hierarchy in France evolved slowly at the king's court, barely taking into account any more exalted status a foreign prince might enjoy in his own dynasty's realm.

Order of precedence

precedenceorders of precedencerank
Most courts featured a strict order of precedence, often involving royal and noble ranks, orders of chivalry, and nobility.
Historically, the order of precedence had a more widespread use, especially in court and aristocratic life.

Nobility

noblemannoblenobles
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court. Most courts featured a strict order of precedence, often involving royal and noble ranks, orders of chivalry, and nobility. Hence the word court may also be applied to the coterie of a senior member of the nobility.
In the last years of the ancien régime the old nobility pushed for restrictions of certain offices and orders of chivalry to noblemen who could demonstrate that their lineage had extended "quarterings", i.e. several generations of noble ancestry, to be eligible for offices and favors at court along with nobles of medieval descent, although historians such as William Doyle have disputed this so-called "Aristocratic Reaction".

Court appointment

appointedcontinoContino real
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court.
Court appointments are the traditional positions within a royal, ducal, or noble household.

Royal household

householdImperial HouseholdBritish Royal Household
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court. A court is an extended royal household in a monarchy, including all those who regularly attend on a monarch, or another central figure.
It was the core of the royal court, though this included many courtiers who were not directly employed by the monarch as part of the household.

Castle

castlesMedieval castlefortification
Accordingly, some founded elaborate courts based on new palaces, only to have their successors retreat to remote castles or to practical administrative centers.
They allowed the garrison to control the surrounding area, and formed a centre of administration, providing the lord with a place to hold court.

Etiquette

mannersprotocolpropriety
Etiquette and hierarchy flourish in highly structured court settings, and may leave conservative traces over generations.
The Book of the Courtier (1528), by Baldassare Castiglione, identified the manners and the morals required by socially ambitious men and women for success in a royal court of the Italian Renaissance (14th–17th c.); as an etiquette text, The Courtier was an influential courtesy book in 16th-century Europe.

Somali aristocratic and court titles

Somali SultanatesAwnaa'ibs
Various Somali Sultanates also existed, including the Adal Sultanate (led by the Walashma dynasty of the Ifat Sultanate), Sultanate of Mogadishu, Ajuran Sultanate, Warsangali Sultanate, Geledi Sultanate, Majeerteen Sultanate and Sultanate of Hobyo.
Below is a list of the royal court titles historically retained by the Somali monarchies and aristocracies.

Court of St James's

Court of St. James'sCourt of St. JamesCourt of St James
As an example, ambassadors to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St. James's, and courtiers of the monarchy may still have offices in St James's Palace, London.
The Court of St James's is the royal court for the Sovereign of the United Kingdom.

Aliénor de Poitiers

Eleanor de Poitiers
Later Aliénor de Poitiers of the Burgundian court would write one of the seminal books on court etiquette Les honneurs de la cour (Honors of the Court).
Her work was later published as Les Honneurs de la Cour (Honors of the Court) The book gives the structures and rules of court ritual and the etiquette appropriate to different social classes and situations.

Imperial, royal and noble ranks

ranknoble titlehigh nobility
Most courts featured a strict order of precedence, often involving royal and noble ranks, orders of chivalry, and nobility.

Official residence

residenceList of official residencesexecutive mansion
Some former seats of power (see official residence):

Masque

masquescourt masquecourt masques
The masque was a form of festive courtly entertainment that flourished in 16th- and early 17th-century Europe, though it was developed earlier in Italy, in forms including the intermedio (a public version of the masque was the pageant).

Courtesy book

Boke of Curtasye
A courtesy book or book of manners was a book dealing with issues of etiquette, behaviour and morals, with a particular focus on the life at princely courts.

Curia regis

royal councilKing's Councilhis council
Curia regis is a Latin term meaning "royal council" or "king's court".

World of A Song of Ice and Fire

WesterosKing's LandingWinterfell
It is the seat of the royal court.

Monarch

kingSovereignkings
A court is an extended royal household in a monarchy, including all those who regularly attend on a monarch, or another central figure.

Itinerant court

itineranciesitinerant (wandering) governmenttravelling from country to country with no single fixed capital city
Royal courts may have their seat in a designated place, several specific places, or be a mobile, itinerant court.

Retinue

retainersretainerretinues
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court.

Bodyguard

bodyguardsclose protectionbody guard
These courtiers included the monarch or noble's camarilla and retinue, household, nobility, those with court appointments, bodyguard, and may also include emissaries from other kingdoms or visitors to the court.

Exile

banishmentinternal exilebanished
Foreign princes and foreign nobility in exile may also seek refuge at a court.