Rudolf Klein-Rogge

Rudolph Klein-Rogge
Rudolf Klein-Rogge (born Friedrich Rudolf Klein) was a German film actor, best-known for playing sinister figures in films in the 1920s and 1930s as well as being a main-stay in director Fritz Lang's Weimar-era films.wikipedia
113 Related Articles

Metropolis (1927 film)

Metropolis1927 film of the same namefilm of the same name
He is probably best known in popular culture, particularly to English-speaking audiences, for playing the archetypal mad scientist role of C. A. Rotwang in Lang's Metropolis and as the criminal genius Doctor Mabuse. Despite the split, Klein-Rogge made several films that were written by von Harbou and directed by Lang, including Destiny, Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, Die Nibelungen, Metropolis and Spies. One of his childhood friends was future film composer Gottfried Huppertz, who was to write the scores for Lang’s Die Nibelungen as well as Metropolis.
Written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Brigitte Helm.

Rotwang

C. A. RotwangDr. Rotwang
He is probably best known in popular culture, particularly to English-speaking audiences, for playing the archetypal mad scientist role of C. A. Rotwang in Lang's Metropolis and as the criminal genius Doctor Mabuse.
In the film, Rotwang was played by Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

Thea von Harbou

In Aachen, Klein-Rogge wed actress Gerda Melchior, a cousin of the beloved silent film star Henny Porten, but the marriage ended when he met actress and novelist Thea von Harbou.
After her debut in 1906, Harbou met Rudolf Klein-Rogge and married him during World War I.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

Das Cabinet des Dr. CaligariDr. CaligariThe Cabinet of Dr Caligari
It has been more widely stated that he appeared in an uncredited role of a criminal in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari However, recent research has found that the part was actually played by Ludwig Rex.
That night, the police apprehend a criminal in possession of a knife (Rudolf Klein-Rogge) who is caught attempting to murder an elderly woman.

Mad scientist

mad doctorevil scientistmad scientists
He is probably best known in popular culture, particularly to English-speaking audiences, for playing the archetypal mad scientist role of C. A. Rotwang in Lang's Metropolis and as the criminal genius Doctor Mabuse.
Portrayed by actor Rudolf Klein-Rogge, Rotwang himself is the prototypically conflicted mad scientist; though he is master of almost mystical scientific power, he remains a slave to his own desires for power and revenge.

Dr. Mabuse the Gambler

Dr. Mabuse, der SpielerDr. Mabuse: The GamblerDr. Mabuse der Spieler
Despite the split, Klein-Rogge made several films that were written by von Harbou and directed by Lang, including Destiny, Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, Die Nibelungen, Metropolis and Spies.

Gottfried Huppertz

One of his childhood friends was future film composer Gottfried Huppertz, who was to write the scores for Lang’s Die Nibelungen as well as Metropolis.
His first composition, "Rankende Rosen", was dedicated to the actor Rudolf Klein-Rogge, who introduced him in the early 1920s to director Fritz Lang and to Thea von Harbou (who later married Lang, but was at the time still married to Klein-Rogge).

The Testament of Dr. Mabuse

Das Testament des Dr. MabuseLe testament du Dr. MabuseThe Testament of Dr Mabuse
Klein-Rogge's last film with Lang was The Testament of Dr. Mabuse in 1933.
The film features Rudolf Klein-Rogge as Dr. Mabuse who is in an insane asylum where he is found frantically writing his crime plans.

Spione

Spies
Despite the split, Klein-Rogge made several films that were written by von Harbou and directed by Lang, including Destiny, Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, Die Nibelungen, Metropolis and Spies.
As in Lang's Mabuse films, such as Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse, Rudolf Klein-Rogge plays a master criminal aiming for world domination.

Dr. Mabuse

Doctor MabuseDr MabuseMabuse
He is probably best known in popular culture, particularly to English-speaking audiences, for playing the archetypal mad scientist role of C. A. Rotwang in Lang's Metropolis and as the criminal genius Doctor Mabuse.
After conversations with Lang and von Harbou, Jacques agreed to discontinue the novel and the sequel instead became the 1933 movie The Testament of Dr. Mabuse, in which the Mabuse of 1920 – played again by Rudolf Klein-Rogge – is an inmate in an insane asylum but has for some time been obsessively writing meticulous plans for crime and terrorism, plans that are being performed by a gang of criminals outside the asylum, who receive their orders from a person who has identified himself to them only as Dr. Mabuse.

Cologne

KölnCologne, GermanyKöln, Germany
Friedrich Rudolf Klein was born in Cologne, Germany on November 24, 1885.

Destiny (1921 film)

DestinyDer müde TodDer Muede Tod
Despite the split, Klein-Rogge made several films that were written by von Harbou and directed by Lang, including Destiny, Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, Die Nibelungen, Metropolis and Spies.

Mary Johnson (actress)

Mary Johnson
Klein-Rogge remarried twice, first to Margarete Neff, and lastly with the Swedish actress Mary Johnson in 1932, to whom he remained married until his death in 1955.
She was married to the actor Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

The Stone Rider

Der steinerne Reiter
The Stone Rider (Der steinerne Reiter) is a 1923 German silent drama film directed by Fritz Wendhausen and starring Rudolf Klein-Rogge, Lucie Mannheim and Gustav von Wangenheim.

Circus of Life

Circus of Life (German: Zirkus des Lebens) is a 1921 German silent drama film directed by Johannes Guter and starring Werner Krauss, Lydia Potechina and Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

The Wandering Image

Das wandernde Bild
The Wandering Image (German: Das wandernde Bild) is a 1920 German silent drama film directed by Fritz Lang and starring Mia May, Hans Marr and Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

Hanneles Himmelfahrt (film)

Hanneles Himmelfahrtremade as a sound film
Klein-Rogge played the lead roles in two films written and directed by von Harbou: Elisabeth und der Narr and Hanneles Himmelfahrt.

Die Nibelungen

Die Nibelungen: SiegfriedDie Nibelungen: Kriemhilds RacheSiegfried
Despite the split, Klein-Rogge made several films that were written by von Harbou and directed by Lang, including Destiny, Dr. Mabuse the Gambler, Die Nibelungen, Metropolis and Spies. One of his childhood friends was future film composer Gottfried Huppertz, who was to write the scores for Lang’s Die Nibelungen as well as Metropolis.

The Black Count (film)

The Black CountThe Black Count'' (film)
The Black Count (Der schwarze Graf) is a 1920 German silent film directed by Otz Tollen and starring Olga Engl, Alfred Abel and Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

White Slave Traffic

White Slave Traffic'' (film)
White Slave Traffic (German: Mädchenhandel - Eine internationale Gefahr) is a 1926 German silent thriller film directed by Jaap Speyer and starring Rudolf Klein-Rogge, Erich Kaiser-Titz and Fritz Alberti.

Peter the Pirate

Pietro der KorsarThe Sea Wolves'' (1925 film)
Klein-Rogge's intense look led him to similar roles such as a tyrant in Fritz Wendhausen's Der steinerne Reiter, a pirate in Arthur Robison's Pietro der Korsar, and the Czar in Alexandre Volkoff's Casanova.
Peter the Pirate (Pietro der Korsar), also known in English as The Sea Wolves, is a 1925 German silent historical adventure film directed by Arthur Robison and starring Paul Richter, Aud Egede Nissen and Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

The Pink Diamond

The Pink Diamond (Der rosa Diamant) is a 1926 German silent comedy drama film directed by Rochus Gliese and starring Xenia Desni, Rudolf Klein-Rogge and William Dieterle.

Elisabeth und der Narr

Klein-Rogge played the lead roles in two films written and directed by von Harbou: Elisabeth und der Narr and Hanneles Himmelfahrt.

The World Without a Mask

It also features Olga Tschechowa and Rudolf Klein-Rogge.

The Nights of Cornelis Brouwer

The Nights of Cornelis Brouwer (Die Nächte des Cornelis Brouwer) is a 1921 German silent thriller film directed by Reinhard Bruck and William Wauer and starring Albert Bassermann, Colette Corder and Rudolf Klein-Rogge.The plot, about a respectable citizen who is taken over by a wild other self during nights on the town, is similar to that of Der Andere.