Rudolf Steiner

SteinerDr. Rudolf SteinerSteiner, RudolfR. SteinerRudolf SteinskolenThe Fifth GospelWaldorf (or Steiner)
Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner (27 (or 25) February 1861 – 30 March 1925) was an Austrian clairvoyant, philosopher, social reformer, architect, economist and esotericist.wikipedia
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Anthroposophy

anthroposophistanthroposophicalanthroposophic
At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism. He subsequently presented a teacher training course at Torquay in 1924 at an Anthroposophy Summer School organised by Eleanor Merry.
Anthroposophy is a philosophy founded in the early 20th century by the esotericist Rudolf Steiner that postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world, accessible to human experience.

Eurythmy

eurythmisteurhythmyEurythmics
In a second phase, beginning around 1907, he began working collaboratively in a variety of artistic media, including drama, the movement arts (developing a new artistic form, eurythmy) and architecture, culminating in the building of the Goetheanum, a cultural centre to house all the arts.
Eurythmy is an expressive movement art originated by Rudolf Steiner in conjunction with Marie von Sivers in the early 20th century.

Spirituality

spiritualspirituallyspiritual life
In the first, more philosophically oriented phase of this movement, Steiner attempted to find a synthesis between science and spirituality.
A second, related influence was Anthroposophy, whose founder, Rudolf Steiner, was particularly interested in developing a genuine Western spirituality, and in the ways that such a spirituality could transform practical institutions such as education, agriculture, and medicine.

Goetheanum

first GoetheanumAnthroposophical SocietySecond Goetheanum
In a second phase, beginning around 1907, he began working collaboratively in a variety of artistic media, including drama, the movement arts (developing a new artistic form, eurythmy) and architecture, culminating in the building of the Goetheanum, a cultural centre to house all the arts. In 1913, construction began on the first Goetheanum building, in Dornach, Switzerland. His two Goetheanum buildings have been widely cited as masterpieces of modern architecture, and other anthroposophical architects have contributed thousands of buildings to the modern scene.
The building was designed by Rudolf Steiner and named after Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

Marie Steiner-von Sivers

Marie von SiversMarie SteinerMarie von Sievers
It was also in connection with this society that Steiner met and worked with Marie von Sivers, who became his second wife in 1914.
Marie Steiner-von Sivers (born Marie von Sivers, 14 March 1867 – 27 December 1948) was the second wife of Rudolf Steiner and one of his closest colleagues.

Waldorf education

Waldorf schoolWaldorfSteiner School
In the third phase of his work, beginning after World War I, Steiner worked to establish various practical endeavors, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and anthroposophical medicine.
Waldorf education, also known as Steiner education, is based on the educational philosophy of Rudolf Steiner, the founder of Anthroposophy.

Anthroposophical Society

General Anthroposophical SocietyAnthroposophic SocietyAnthroposophical Society in America
This and other differences, in particular Steiner's vocal rejection of Leadbeater and Besant's claim that Jiddu Krishnamurti was the vehicle of a new Maitreya, or world teacher, led to a formal split in 1912/13, when Steiner and the majority of members of the German section of the Theosophical Society broke off to form a new group, the Anthroposophical Society.
As an organization, it is dedicated to supporting the community of those interested in the inner path of schooling known as anthroposophy, developed by Rudolf Steiner.

Goethean science

GoetheanGoetheGoethe's morphology
At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism. His philosophical ideas were affected by Franz Brentano, with whom he had studied, as well as by Fichte, Hegel, Schelling, and Goethe's phenomenological approach to science.
The German philosopher and mystic Rudolf Steiner, who was at one point an assistant editor of the standard edition of Goethe's works, applied Goethe's methodology of a living approach to Nature to the performing and fine arts.

Social threefolding

Threefold Social OrderThe Threefold Social Order
Steiner became a well-known and controversial public figure during and after World War I. In response to the catastrophic situation in post-war Germany, he proposed extensive social reforms through the establishment of a Threefold Social Order in which the cultural, political and economic realms would be largely independent.
Social threefolding is an ideology from Rudolf Steiner suggesting the progressive independence of society's economic, political and cultural institutions.

Rudolf Steiner's exercises for spiritual development

exercises for spiritual developmentmeditative exercises given by Steiner
The School of Spiritual Science included meditative exercises given by Steiner.
Rudolf Steiner developed exercises aimed at cultivating new cognitive faculties he believed would be appropriate to contemporary individual and cultural development.

Biodynamic agriculture

biodynamicbiodynamic farmingBiodynamics
In the third phase of his work, beginning after World War I, Steiner worked to establish various practical endeavors, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and anthroposophical medicine. He also founded a system of organic agriculture, now known as biodynamic agriculture, which was one of the very first forms of, and has contributed significantly to the development of, modern organic farming.
Biodynamic agriculture is a form of alternative agriculture very similar to organic farming, but it includes various esoteric concepts drawn from the ideas of Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925).

Anthroposophic medicine

anthroposophical medicineanthroposophicalanthroposophist
In the third phase of his work, beginning after World War I, Steiner worked to establish various practical endeavors, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and anthroposophical medicine.
Devised in the 1920s by Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925) in conjunction with Ita Wegman (1876–1943), anthroposophical medicine is based on occult notions and draws on Steiner's spiritual philosophy, which he called anthroposophy.

Franz Brentano

BrentanoDescriptive psychology (Brentano)Franz
His philosophical ideas were affected by Franz Brentano, with whom he had studied, as well as by Fichte, Hegel, Schelling, and Goethe's phenomenological approach to science.
Franz Clemens Honoratus Hermann Brentano (16 January 1838 – 17 March 1917) was an influential German philosopher, psychologist, and priest whose work strongly influenced not only students Edmund Husserl, Sigmund Freud, Tomáš Masaryk, Rudolf Steiner, Alexius Meinong, Carl Stumpf, Anton Marty, Kazimierz Twardowski, and Christian von Ehrenfels, but many others whose work would follow and make use of his original ideas and concepts.

Dornach

Dornach, SwitzerlandDornach SO
In 1913, construction began on the first Goetheanum building, in Dornach, Switzerland.
Today Dornach is famous for the Goetheanum and is home to the international headquarters of the Anthroposophical movement founded by Rudolf Steiner.

Rudolf Steiner's Mystery Dramas

four playsThe Guardian of the Threshold
Steiner's writings, published in about forty volumes, include books, essays, four plays ('mystery dramas'), mantric verse, and an autobiography.
Rudolf Steiner wrote four plays that follow the initiation journeys of a group of fictional characters through a series of lives.

Organic farming

organicorganic agricultureorganic farm
He also founded a system of organic agriculture, now known as biodynamic agriculture, which was one of the very first forms of, and has contributed significantly to the development of, modern organic farming.
In 1924 Rudolf Steiner gave a series of eight lectures on agriculture with a focus on influences of the moon, planets, non-physical beings and elemental forces.

Eleanor Merry

He subsequently presented a teacher training course at Torquay in 1924 at an Anthroposophy Summer School organised by Eleanor Merry.
She studied in Vienna and met Rudolf Steiner in 1922 after becoming interested in his teachings.

Donji Kraljevec

Kraljevec
Johann became a telegraph operator on the Southern Austrian Railway, and at the time of Rudolf's birth was stationed in Murakirály (Kraljevec) in the Muraköz region of the Kingdom of Hungary, Austrian Empire (present-day Donji Kraljevec in the Međimurje region of northernmost Croatia).
* Rudolf Steiner - philosopher

Theosophy

theosophisttheosophicalTheosophists
At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.
Many esoteric groups — such as Alice Bailey's Arcane School and Rudolf Steiner's Anthroposophy — are "directly dependent" on Theosophy.

Édouard Schuré

Edouard SchuréEdouard Schure
Fueled by a need to find an artistic home for their yearly conferences, which included performances of plays written by Edouard Schuré and Steiner, the decision was made to build a theater and organizational center.
Schuré called the three most significant of his friendships those with Richard Wagner, Marguerita Albana Mignaty and Rudolf Steiner.

Ita Wegman

Dr. Ita Wegman
At around the same time, Dr. Ita Wegman founded a first anthroposophic medical clinic (now the Ita Wegman Clinic) in Arlesheim.
Ita Wegman (22 February 1876 - 4 March 1943) co-founded Anthroposophical Medicine with Rudolf Steiner.

Modern architecture

modernistModernModernism
His two Goetheanum buildings have been widely cited as masterpieces of modern architecture, and other anthroposophical architects have contributed thousands of buildings to the modern scene.
The Austrian philosopher, architect and social critic Rudolf Steiner also departed as far as possible from traditional architectural forms.

Rosicrucianism

RosicrucianRosicruciansRosicrucian Manifestos
At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.

Karl Robert Eduard von Hartmann

Eduard von HartmannHartmannVon Hartmann
Steiner's dissertation was later published in expanded form as Truth and Knowledge: Prelude to a Philosophy of Freedom, with a dedication to Eduard von Hartmann.
Rudolf Steiner, referring to Hartmann's Critical Establishment of Transcendental Realism (Kritische Grundlegung des transzendentalen Realismus, 2nd Edition Berlin, 1875) gave his opinion, in the preface to his own book Truth and Knowledge (1892), that Hartmann's world-view was "the most significant philosophical work of our time".

The Philosophy of Freedom

Philosophy of Freedom
Steiner gained initial recognition at the end of the nineteenth century as a literary critic and published philosophical works including The Philosophy of Freedom.
The Philosophy of Freedom is the fundamental philosophical work of the philosopher and esotericist Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925).