Rudolf Steiner

SteinerDr. Rudolf SteinerSteiner, RudolfR. SteinerRudolf SteinskolenThe Fifth GospelWaldorf (or Steiner)
Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner (27 (or 25) February 1861 – 30 March 1925) was an Austrian clairvoyant, philosopher, social reformer, architect, economist and esotericist.wikipedia
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Annie Besant

Annie BeasantDr. Annie BesantAnnie Wood Besant
By 1904, Steiner was appointed by Annie Besant to be leader of the Theosophical Esoteric Society for Germany and Austria. This and other differences, in particular Steiner's vocal rejection of Leadbeater and Besant's claim that Jiddu Krishnamurti was the vehicle of a new Maitreya, or world teacher, led to a formal split in 1912/13, when Steiner and the majority of members of the German section of the Theosophical Society broke off to form a new group, the Anthroposophical Society.

Helmuth von Moltke the Younger

Helmuth von MoltkeMoltkeGeneral von Moltke
In 1904, Eliza, the wife of Helmuth von Moltke the Younger, became one of his favourite scholars.

German General Staff

General StaffChief of the General StaffGeneralstab
Through Eliza, Steiner met Helmuth, who served as the Chief of the German General Staff from 1906 to 1914.

Charles Webster Leadbeater

C.W. LeadbeaterC. W. LeadbeaterCharles W. Leadbeater
This and other differences, in particular Steiner's vocal rejection of Leadbeater and Besant's claim that Jiddu Krishnamurti was the vehicle of a new Maitreya, or world teacher, led to a formal split in 1912/13, when Steiner and the majority of members of the German section of the Theosophical Society broke off to form a new group, the Anthroposophical Society.

Jiddu Krishnamurti

J. KrishnamurtiKrishnamurtiJ Krishnamurti
This and other differences, in particular Steiner's vocal rejection of Leadbeater and Besant's claim that Jiddu Krishnamurti was the vehicle of a new Maitreya, or world teacher, led to a formal split in 1912/13, when Steiner and the majority of members of the German section of the Theosophical Society broke off to form a new group, the Anthroposophical Society.

Robert von Zimmermann

Robert Zimmermann
Steiner took the name "Anthroposophy" from the title of a work of the Austrian philosopher Robert von Zimmermann, published in Vienna in 1856.

Berlin

Berlin, GermanyState of BerlinGerman capital
Steiner moved from Berlin to Dornach in 1913 and lived there to the end of his life.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
In the third phase of his work, beginning after World War I, Steiner worked to establish various practical endeavors, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and anthroposophical medicine.

Upper Silesia

OberschlesienUpperGórny Śląsk
In connection with this, he promoted a radical solution in the disputed area of Upper Silesia, claimed by both Poland and Germany.

Woodrow Wilson

WilsonPresident WilsonPresident Woodrow Wilson
Steiner opposed Wilson's proposal to create new European nations based around ethnic groups, which he saw as opening the door to rampant nationalism.

Nazi Party

NSDAPNazisNazi
The National Socialist German Workers Party gained strength in Germany after the First World War.

Dietrich Eckart

Dietrich EckhartDietrich-Eckart-BühneECKART, Dietrich
In 1919, a political theorist of this movement, Dietrich Eckart, attacked Steiner and suggested that he was a Jew.

Adolf Hitler

HitlerFührerthe leader
In 1921, Adolf Hitler attacked Steiner on many fronts, including accusations that he was a tool of the Jews, while other nationalist extremists in Germany called for a "war against Steiner".

Beer Hall Putsch

Munich PutschBeerhall PutschTheodor von der Pfordten
The 1923 Beer Hall Putsch in Munich led Steiner to give up his residence in Berlin, saying that if those responsible for the attempted coup [Hitler and others] came to power in Germany, it would no longer be possible for him to enter the country.

Mysticism

mysticmysticalmystics
By 1901 he had begun to write about spiritual topics, initially in the form of discussions of historical figures such as the mystics of the Middle Ages.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
By 1901 he had begun to write about spiritual topics, initially in the form of discussions of historical figures such as the mystics of the Middle Ages.

Ethics

ethicalmoral philosophyethic
He believed that through freely chosen ethical disciplines and meditative training, anyone could develop the ability to experience the spiritual world, including the higher nature of oneself and others.

Meditation

meditativemeditatemeditating
He believed that through freely chosen ethical disciplines and meditative training, anyone could develop the ability to experience the spiritual world, including the higher nature of oneself and others.

Spirit

spiritsspiritual beingruach
He believed that through freely chosen ethical disciplines and meditative training, anyone could develop the ability to experience the spiritual world, including the higher nature of oneself and others.

Discipline

self-disciplinedisciplinariandisciplinary
Steiner believed that such discipline and training would help a person to become a more moral, creative and free individual – free in the sense of being capable of actions motivated solely by love.

Morality

moralmoralsmoral code
Steiner believed that such discipline and training would help a person to become a more moral, creative and free individual – free in the sense of being capable of actions motivated solely by love.

Creativity

creativecreative processcreative thinking
Steiner believed that such discipline and training would help a person to become a more moral, creative and free individual – free in the sense of being capable of actions motivated solely by love.

Individual

individualityindividualshuman identity
Steiner believed that such discipline and training would help a person to become a more moral, creative and free individual – free in the sense of being capable of actions motivated solely by love.

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

HegelG. W. F. HegelG.W.F. Hegel
His philosophical ideas were affected by Franz Brentano, with whom he had studied, as well as by Fichte, Hegel, Schelling, and Goethe's phenomenological approach to science.

Ancient and Primitive Rite

Oriental Rite of MemphisAncient and Primitive Rite of Memphis-MizraímEgyptian Rite of Freemasonry