Run (baseball)

runsruns scoredrunRscoringrun scoredtwo-runruns allowedscorelessscored
In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured.wikipedia
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Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured.
The objectives of the offensive team (batting team) are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs".

Baseball rules

grounded outground outgroundout
The Official Baseball Rules hold that if the third out of an inning is a force out of a runner advancing to any base then, even if another baserunner crosses home plate before that force out is made, his run does not count.
At the college/professional level, baseball is played in nine innings in which each team gets one turn to bat and tries to score runs while the other pitches and defends in the field.

Baseball statistics

whiff ratestatisticsbaseball statistic
In baseball statistics, a player who advances around all the bases to score is credited with a run (R), sometimes referred to as a "run scored".
Based on his experience with the sport of cricket, Chadwick devised the predecessors to modern-day statistics including batting average, runs scored, and runs allowed.

Run batted in

Runs batted inRBIRBIs
While runs scored is considered an important individual batting statistic, it is regarded as less significant than runs batted in (RBIs).
A run batted in (RBI), plural runs batted in (RBI or RBIs), is a statistic in baseball and softball that credits a batter for making a play that allows a run to be scored (except in certain situations such as when an error is made on the play).

Earned run

earned runsearnedunearned run
A pitcher is likewise assessed runs surrendered in his statistics, which differentiate between standard earned runs (for which the pitcher is statistically assigned full responsibility) and unearned runs scored due to fielding errors, which do not count in his personal statistics.
In baseball, an earned run is any run that was fully enabled by the offensive team's production in the face of competent play from the defensive team.

Rickey Henderson

The career record for most runs scored by a major-league player is 2,295, held by Rickey Henderson (1979–2003).
He holds the major league records for career stolen bases, runs, unintentional walks and leadoff home runs.

Shawn Green

Green
Of the six modern-day players to score 6 runs in a game, the first to perform the feat was Mel Ott of the New York Giants on August 4, 1934 (he repeated the accomplishment ten years later, making him the only player ever to do it twice); the most recent was Shawn Green, then of the Los Angeles Dodgers, on May 23, 2002.
He drove in 100 runs four times and scored 100 runs four times, hit 40 or more home runs three times, led the league in doubles, extra base hits, and total bases, won both a Gold Glove Award and a Silver Slugger Award, and set the Dodgers single-season record in home runs.

Force play

force outforcedforce base
The Official Baseball Rules hold that if the third out of an inning is a force out of a runner advancing to any base then, even if another baserunner crosses home plate before that force out is made, his run does not count.
No run can be scored during the same continuous playing action as a force out for the third out, even if a runner reaches home plate before the third out is recorded.

Shutouts in baseball

shutoutshutoutsSHO
The team record for most consecutive games with at least one run scored (i.e., most consecutive games not being shut out) is 308, set by the Yankees between August 3, 1931, and August 2, 1933.
In Major League Baseball, a shutout (denoted statistically as ShO or SHO ) refers to the act by which a single pitcher pitches a complete game and does not allow the opposing team to score a run.

Official scorer

Official Scoringscorersto score
Specifically, if a fielding error occurs which affects the number of runs scored in an inning, the Official Scorer – the official in-game statistician – in order to determine how many of the runs should be classified as earned, will reconstruct the inning as if the error had not occurred.
In a similarly difficult judgment call where the official scorer believes that an earned run or an unearned run are equally valid scoring decisions, rule 10.16 directs the official scorer to give the benefit of the doubt to the pitcher.

Babe Ruth

George Herman "Babe" RuthGeorge Herman ("Babe") RuthRuth
The so-called modern-day record (1900 and after) is 177, achieved by Babe Ruth of the New York Yankees in 1921.
The rest of the league sold 600,000 more tickets, many fans there to see Ruth, who led the league with 54 home runs, 158 runs, and 137 runs batted in (RBIs).

Red Rolfe

Robert A. "Red" RolfeRobert Rolfe
The record for most consecutive games with at least one run scored is 18, shared by the Yankees' Red Rolfe (August 9–August 25, 1939) and the Cleveland Indians' Kenny Lofton (August 15–September 3, 2000).
His finest season came in 1939, when he amassed 213 hits, 139 runs scored, and 46 doubles while hitting .329 with 14 home runs and 80 runs batted in.

Mel Ott

Ott
Of the six modern-day players to score 6 runs in a game, the first to perform the feat was Mel Ott of the New York Giants on August 4, 1934 (he repeated the accomplishment ten years later, making him the only player ever to do it twice); the most recent was Shawn Green, then of the Los Angeles Dodgers, on May 23, 2002.
In his 22-season career, Ott batted .304 with 511 home runs, 1,860 RBIs, 1,859 runs, 2,876 hits, 488 doubles, 72 triples, 89 stolen bases, a .414 on-base percentage and a .533 slugging average.

Mickey Mantle

MantleMickeya mysterious man wearing a New York Yankees hat
The Yankees' Mickey Mantle holds the record for most career World Series runs scored with 42 (1951–53, 1955–58, 1960–64).
Mantle appeared in 12 World Series including seven championships, and holds World Series records for the most home runs (18), RBIs (40), extra-base hits (26), runs (42), walks (43), and total bases (123).

Kenny Lofton

The record for most consecutive games with at least one run scored is 18, shared by the Yankees' Red Rolfe (August 9–August 25, 1939) and the Cleveland Indians' Kenny Lofton (August 15–September 3, 2000).
He finished the 2000 season batting .278, recording 30 stolen bases and 107 runs (the sixth time crossing home plate 100 times or more in nine seasons).

Albert Pujols

Pujols[Albert] PujolsEl Hombre
Babe Ruth set the mark on October 6, 1926, while with the Yankees; it was matched most recently by Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 of the 2011 World Series.
He finished the season batting .329 (sixth in the league) with 194 hits (fifth in the league), 47 doubles (fifth in the league), 37 home runs and 112 runs.

Paul Molitor

Molitor
The record for most runs scored in a single World Series, shared by two players, is 10, achieved both times in a six-game Series: Reggie Jackson of the Yankees was the first to do it, in 1977; the Toronto Blue Jays' Paul Molitor equaled him in 1993.
During the 1982 season, he hit .302 and led the American League (AL) with 136 runs scored.

Run differential

Run differential
Run differential is calculated by subtracting runs allowed from runs scored.

2011 World Series

2011World Series2011 Series
Babe Ruth set the mark on October 6, 1926, while with the Yankees; it was matched most recently by Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 of the 2011 World Series.
After a total of just eight runs scored in the first two games in St. Louis, the offense of the two lineups scored a combined 23 runs on a historic night in Arlington in which Albert Pujols had what was described as "the greatest individual hitting performance in World Series history".

Out (baseball)

outoutsretired
In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured.

Baseball field

home platecenter fieldbaseball diamond
In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured.

Home run

home runsHRhomer
A player may score by hitting a home run or by any combination of plays that puts him safely "on base" (that is, on first, second, or third) as a runner and subsequently brings him home.

Tag out

tagTaggingtagout
However, if the third out is not a force out, but a tag out, then if that other baserunner crosses home plate before that tag out is made, his run will count.

Runs created

problemsruns-created statistic
Both individual runs scored and runs batted in are heavily context-dependent; for a more sophisticated assessment of a player's contribution toward producing runs for his team see runs created.

Pitcher

Ppitchedpitching
A pitcher is likewise assessed runs surrendered in his statistics, which differentiate between standard earned runs (for which the pitcher is statistically assigned full responsibility) and unearned runs scored due to fielding errors, which do not count in his personal statistics.