Ruricius

Codex Sangallensis 190St Ruricius
Ruricius I (c. 440 – c. 510) was a Gallo-Roman aristocrat and bishop of Limoges from c.wikipedia
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Sidonius Apollinaris

SidoniusGaius Sollius Modestus Apollinaris SidoniusGaius Sollius Apollinaris Sidonius
He is one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others include Sidonius Apollinaris, urban prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, Bishop of Vienne (died 518); and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, Bishop of Ticinum (died 534).
He was one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity; the others are Ruricius bishop of Limoges (died 507), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, bishop of Vienne (died 518) and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, bishop of Ticinum (died 534).

Magnus Felix Ennodius

EnnodiusEnnodius of PaviaSt. Magnus Felix Ennodius
He is one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others include Sidonius Apollinaris, urban prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, Bishop of Vienne (died 518); and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, Bishop of Ticinum (died 534).
He was one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others are Sidonius Apollinaris, prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Ruricius bishop of Limoges (died 507) and Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, bishop of Vienne (died 518).

Rusticus (archbishop of Lyon)

RusticusSt. RusticusRusticus of Lyon
He should not be confused with his son-in-law, Saint Rusticus (Archbishop of Lyon).
Married before 480 to Hiberie de Limoges (born c. 460), daughter of Ruricius, Bishop of Limoges (then Augustoritum) and his wife Ommance.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Limoges

bishop of LimogesLimogesDiocese of Limoges
Ruricius I (c. 440 – c. 510) was a Gallo-Roman aristocrat and bishop of Limoges from c. 485 to 510.
Ruricius 507

Gallo-Roman culture

Gallo-RomanGallo-RomansRoman
Ruricius I (c. 440 – c. 510) was a Gallo-Roman aristocrat and bishop of Limoges from c. 485 to 510.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGaulish
He is one of the writers whose letters survive from late Roman Gaul, depicting the influence of the Visigoths on the Roman lifestyle.

Clermont-Ferrand

ClermontClermont-Ferrand International Short Film FestivalClermont Ferrand
He is one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others include Sidonius Apollinaris, urban prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, Bishop of Vienne (died 518); and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, Bishop of Ticinum (died 534).

Avitus of Vienne

AvitusAlcimus Ecdicius AvitusSt. Avitus
He is one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others include Sidonius Apollinaris, urban prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, Bishop of Vienne (died 518); and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, Bishop of Ticinum (died 534).

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vienne

bishop of Viennearchbishop of VienneVienne
He is one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others include Sidonius Apollinaris, urban prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, Bishop of Vienne (died 518); and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, Bishop of Ticinum (died 534).

Ticinum

Bishop of TicinumPavia
He is one of four Gallo-Roman aristocrats of the fifth- to sixth-century whose letters survive in quantity: the others include Sidonius Apollinaris, urban prefect of Rome in 468 and bishop of Clermont (died 485), Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, Bishop of Vienne (died 518); and Magnus Felix Ennodius of Arles, Bishop of Ticinum (died 534).

Venantius Fortunatus

Saint Venantius FortunatusFortunatFortunatus of Poitiers
According to Venantius Fortunatus, Ruricius was a member of the Anician family, one of the most important aristocratic families in Rome.

Anicia (gens)

AniciaAniciigens Anicia
According to Venantius Fortunatus, Ruricius was a member of the Anician family, one of the most important aristocratic families in Rome.

Rome

RomanRomaRome, Italy
According to Venantius Fortunatus, Ruricius was a member of the Anician family, one of the most important aristocratic families in Rome.

Felix (consul 428)

Flavius FelixFelixFlavius Constantius Felix
The details of his ancestry has been a subject of debate; Mathisen's explanation is that Ruricius was the son of a "Constantius" and a "Leontia" based on his premise that his paternal grandfather may have been Flavius Constantius Felix and his mother a member of the aristocratic familia Pontii Leontii of Burdigalia in Aquitania.

Christian Settipani

Settipani, ChristianSettipani
Christian Settipani agrees that Ruricius' mother was a member of the Pontii Leontii but does not make any specific reference as to who Ruricius' father might be.

Petronius Maximus

PetroniusFlavius Petronius MaximusMaximus
The objection to this hypothesis has been that it makes the unnamed African proconsul an otherwise unattested son of regicide emperor Petronius Maximus and that there are not any Firminid names among Ruricius' immediate descendants.

Arverni

ArvernesArvernianGaul
Ruricius married Hiberia, the daughter of an Arvernian senator Ommatius, a descendant of a Patrician who lived in the 4th century named Philagrius.

Patrician (ancient Rome)

patricianpatrikiospatricians
Ruricius married Hiberia, the daughter of an Arvernian senator Ommatius, a descendant of a Patrician who lived in the 4th century named Philagrius.

Episcopal see

seeseessee city
It is noted that she participated in his conversion to religious life, and thus succession to the episcopal see of Limoges in about 485.

Visigoths

VisigothicVisigothGothic
During the late empire and after the Visigothic takeover of imperial Gaul, it was common for Gallo-Roman aristocrats to take refuge in church office, allowing not only retention of local influence, but also some personal security.

Euric

Euric of Toulouse
Incidentally, Ruricius was appointed bishop of Limoges after the death of king Euric on December 28, 484.

Alaric II

AlaricAlaric II, King of the Visigoths
Euric was succeeded by his son, Alaric II.

Augustine of Hippo

AugustineSt. AugustineSaint Augustine
Apart from his letters, Ruricius' only other known physical legacy is the monastery and church of Saint Augustine, which he built ca. 485.

Battle of Vouillé

battle of Campus Vogladensisconqueredconquest by the Franks
Finally, the letters of Ruricius shed light on the underlying circumstances surrounding the Battle of Vouillé, near Poitiers in 507; a fundamental battle in Gallic history, since it is where the Franks defeated the Visigoths.

Poitiers

PoitevinLimonumPictavium
Finally, the letters of Ruricius shed light on the underlying circumstances surrounding the Battle of Vouillé, near Poitiers in 507; a fundamental battle in Gallic history, since it is where the Franks defeated the Visigoths.