Russian Empire Census

Russian census of 189718971897 Russian census1897 census1897 Russian Empire censusRussian Imperial Census1897 Imperial Russian CensusImperial census of 18971897 Russian Imperial CensusAll-Russian Empire Census
The Russian Imperial Census of 1897 was first and only census carried out in the Russian Empire (Finland was excluded).wikipedia
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Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
The Russian Imperial Census of 1897 was first and only census carried out in the Russian Empire (Finland was excluded).
With 125.6 million subjects registered by the 1897 census, it had the third-largest population in the world at the time, after Qing China and India.

First All-Union Census of the Soviet Union

1926 Soviet census1926First All Union Census of the Soviet Union
The next census to take place in Russia only occurred at the end of 1926, almost three decades later.
Prior to the Russian Revolution, the only Russian Empire Census was done in 1897.

Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
In the Russian Empire Census of 1897 the following picture emerged, with Ukrainian being the second most spoken language of the Russian Empire.

Latvian language

LatvianLatvian-languageLettish
According to the 1897 Imperial Russian Census, there were 505,994 (75.1%) speakers of Latvian in the Governorate of Courland and 563,829 (43.4%) speakers of Latvian in the Governorate of Livonia, making Latvian-speakers the largest linguistic group in each of the governorates.

Belarusian language

BelarusianBelorussianbe
In course of the 1897 Russian Empire Census, about 5.89 million people declared themselves speakers of Belarusian.

Kars Oblast

Kars
Russian Imperial Census of 1897 clearly reflected the new ethnic composition.

Old Believers

Old BelieverRussian Old BelieversPhilipponnen
In the Imperial Russian census of 1897, 2,204,596 people, about 1.75% of the population of the Russian Empire self-declared as Old Believers or other denominations split from the Russian Orthodox Church.

Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, PolandWarschau
The Russian Empire Census of 1897 recorded 626,000 people living in Warsaw, making it the third-largest city of the Empire after St. Petersburg and Moscow.

Łódź

LodzŁódź, PolandLódz
According to the Russian census of 1897, in which Łódź figured as the fifth-largest city of the Russian Empire, out of the total population of 315,000, Jews constituted 99,000 (around 31% percent).

Vilnius

VilnaWilnoVilnius, Lithuania
Vilnius had a vibrant Jewish population: according to Russian census of 1897, out of the total population of 154,500, Jews constituted 64,000 (approximately 40%).

Estates of the realm

EstatesThird Estateestate
Russian Empire Census recorded the reported estate of a person.

Social estates in the Russian Empire

sosloviyesocial estatesmerchantry
The higher ranks belonged to the sosloviye of dvoryanstvo, while the indication of a lower rank of a person was comparable to that of the indication of a soslovie for various formal purposes (e.g., for the Russian Empire Census).

Minsk

Minsk, BelarusStaykiMińsk
According to the 1897 Russian census, the city had 91,494 inhabitants, with some 47,561 Jews constituting more than half of the city population.

Latvia

Republic of LatviaLatvianLAT
According to the Russian Empire Census of 1897, Latvians formed 68.3% of the total population of 1.93 million; Russians accounted for 12%, Jews for 7.4%, Germans for 6.2%, and Poles for 3.4%.

Daugavpils

DvinskDünaburgDyneburg
According to the Russian census of 1897, out of a total population of 69,700, Jews numbered 32,400 (ca.

Vitebsk

VitsebskViciebskWitebsk
Before World War II Vitebsk had a significant Jewish population: according to Russian census of 1897, out of the total population of 65,900, Jews constituted 34,400 (around 52% percent).

Little Russia

MalorossiyaLittle RussianMalorossia
Imperial officials classified the Ukrainian and Belarusian languages as belonging to Russian group and labeled those nationalities as Little Russian for Ukrainians and White Russian for Belarusians.
The term Little Russian language was used by the state authorities in the first Russian Empire Census, conducted in 1897.

Census

UK censuscensusespopulation census
The Russian Imperial Census of 1897 was first and only census carried out in the Russian Empire (Finland was excluded).

Grand Duchy of Finland

FinlandFinnishGrand Duchy
The Russian Imperial Census of 1897 was first and only census carried out in the Russian Empire (Finland was excluded).

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The second Russian Census was scheduled for December 1915, but was cancelled because of the outbreak of World War I one and a half years earlier (in July 1914).

Russian Revolution

Russian Revolution of 1917Revolution1917 Revolution
It was not rescheduled before the Russian Revolution.

Pyotr Semyonov-Tyan-Shansky

Pyotr Semenov-Tyan-ShanskyPyotr SemyonovPeter Semenov
The census project was suggested in 1877 by Pyotr Semenov-Tyan-Shansky, a famous Russian geographer and chief of the Central Statistical Bureau, and was approved by Tsar Nicholas II in 1895.

Geographer

geographers
The census project was suggested in 1877 by Pyotr Semenov-Tyan-Shansky, a famous Russian geographer and chief of the Central Statistical Bureau, and was approved by Tsar Nicholas II in 1895.

Tsar

CzarRussian TsarTsars
The census project was suggested in 1877 by Pyotr Semenov-Tyan-Shansky, a famous Russian geographer and chief of the Central Statistical Bureau, and was approved by Tsar Nicholas II in 1895.

Nicholas II of Russia

Nicholas IITsar Nicholas IICzar Nicholas II
The census project was suggested in 1877 by Pyotr Semenov-Tyan-Shansky, a famous Russian geographer and chief of the Central Statistical Bureau, and was approved by Tsar Nicholas II in 1895.