A report on Ruth Etting

Etting in 1935
Etting in a photo for her CBS radio program sponsored by Oldsmobile.
Etting in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1931
Etting on the cover of the June 1935 edition of Radio Mirror.
Lobby card from No Contest!, 1934

American singer and actress of the 1920s and 1930s, who had over 60 hit recordings and worked in stage, radio, and film.

- Ruth Etting
Etting in 1935

22 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Theatrical release poster

Love Me or Leave Me (film)

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Theatrical release poster

Love Me or Leave Me is a 1955 American biographical romantic musical drama film recounting the life story of Ruth Etting, a singer who rose from dancer to movie star.

Ten Cents a Dance

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Popular song with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Lorenz Hart.

Popular song with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Lorenz Hart.

She was replaced by Ruth Etting in the show, and Etting popularized the song as well in a Columbia recording made in 1930.

Love Me or Leave Me (Donaldson and Kahn song)

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Popular song written in 1928 by Walter Donaldson with lyrics by Gus Kahn.

Popular song written in 1928 by Walter Donaldson with lyrics by Gus Kahn.

Ruth Etting's performance of the song was so popular that she was also given the song to sing in the play Simple Simon, which opened in February 1930.

Ziegfeld in 1928

Florenz Ziegfeld Jr.

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American Broadway impresario, notable for his series of theatrical revues, the Ziegfeld Follies (1907–1931), inspired by the Folies Bergère of Paris.

American Broadway impresario, notable for his series of theatrical revues, the Ziegfeld Follies (1907–1931), inspired by the Folies Bergère of Paris.

Ziegfeld in 1928
Poster for The Sandow Trocadero Vaudevilles, produced by Ziegfeld (1894)
Caricature by Ralph Barton, 1925
Poster for The Great Ziegfeld (1936)

Included among these are Nora Bayes, Fanny Brice, Ruth Etting, W. C. Fields, Eddie Cantor, Marilyn Miller, Will Rogers, Bert Williams and Ann Pennington.

Snyder in 1938

Martin Snyder

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American gangster from Chicago, active in the 1920s and 1930s.

American gangster from Chicago, active in the 1920s and 1930s.

Snyder in 1938

His second wife was the singer and entertainer Ruth Etting, whom he married in 1922 and whose career he aggressively promoted.

Irving Berlin

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American composer, songwriter and lyricist.

American composer, songwriter and lyricist.

Lower East Side in the early 1900s
Berlin at his first job with a music publisher, aged 18
Berlin with film stars Alice Faye, Tyrone Power and Don Ameche singing chorus from Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938)
Enjoying early success in New York, c. 1911
With Al Jolson (r), star of The Jazz Singer, c. 1927
c. undefined 1920
I'll See You in C-U-B-A, cover of 1920 sheet music
Singing "God Bless America" at the Pentagon memorial dedication, September 11, 2008
Irving Berlin singing and conducting aboard USS Arkansas, 1944
Lower East Side in 1909. He said he never forgot his childhood years when he slept under tenement steps, ate scraps, wore secondhand clothes and sold newspapers. "Every man should have a Lower East Side in his life," said Berlin.
The grave of Irving Berlin in Woodlawn Cemetery, the Bronx, New York City
Berlin photographed in 1907 in Pach Brothers Studio

Berlin's songs have reached the top of the charts 25 times and have been extensively re-recorded by numerous singers including The Andrews Sisters, Perry Como, Eddie Fisher, Al Jolson, Fred Astaire, Ethel Merman, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Elvis Presley, Judy Garland, Tiny Tim, Barbra Streisand, Linda Ronstadt, Rosemary Clooney, Cher, Diana Ross, Bing Crosby, Sarah Vaughan, Ruth Etting, Fanny Brice, Marilyn Miller, Rudy Vallée, Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday, Doris Day, Jerry Garcia, Taco, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Ella Fitzgerald, Michael Buble, Lady Gaga, and Christina Aguilera.

Poster for the 1979 Broadway revival

Whoopee!

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1928 musical comedy with a book based on Owen Davis's play, The Nervous Wreck. The musical libretto was written by William Anthony McGuire, with music by Walter Donaldson and lyrics by Gus Kahn.

1928 musical comedy with a book based on Owen Davis's play, The Nervous Wreck. The musical libretto was written by William Anthony McGuire, with music by Walter Donaldson and lyrics by Gus Kahn.

Poster for the 1979 Broadway revival

The musical premiered on Broadway in 1928, starring Eddie Cantor, and introduced the hit song "Love Me or Leave Me", sung by Ruth Etting.

original 1930 sheet music

Simple Simon (musical)

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Broadway musical with book by Guy Bolton, and Ed Wynn, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, music by Richard Rodgers, produced by Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., and starring Ed Wynn.

Broadway musical with book by Guy Bolton, and Ed Wynn, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, music by Richard Rodgers, produced by Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., and starring Ed Wynn.

original 1930 sheet music

The song "Ten Cents a Dance" was introduced by Ruth Etting in this show.

Day in 1957

Doris Day

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American actress, singer, and animal welfare activist.

American actress, singer, and animal welfare activist.

Day in 1957
Childhood home in Cincinnati
Day at the Aquarium Jazz Club, New York (1946)
Gordon MacRae and Day in Starlift (1951)
Day with Howard Keel in Calamity Jane (1953)
Cameron Mitchell, Doris Day, and James Cagney in a publicity still for Love Me or Leave Me (1955)
Day in a publicity portrait for Midnight Lace (1960)
On the set of The Doris Day Show
Day with John Denver on the TV special Doris Day Today
(CBS, February 19, 1975)

Her dramatic star turn as singer Ruth Etting in Love Me or Leave Me (1955), with top billing above James Cagney, received critical and commercial success, becoming Day's biggest hit thus far.

Cover, sheet music, 1908

Shine On, Harvest Moon

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Popular early-1900s song credited to the married vaudeville team Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth.

Popular early-1900s song credited to the married vaudeville team Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth.

Cover, sheet music, 1908

1931 – Ruth Etting revived the song in the Ziegfeld Follies